Hot answers tagged

14

Do you have a French press? If so, you can make coffee that is quite strong in there and you can froth your milk. For the coffee, grind it course. If it's too fine, too much will go through the mesh and your coffee will be murky and over extracted. Buy a very dark roast, but something that isn't too smoky. Italian roast is too smoky. Espresso beans ...


7

There are various techniques, however here's how I do, and I usually get enough foam by making like this. Sometimes really much, sometimes just decent but never too little. First of all, put the water before the coffee to the cezve (or pot, however you call it). Then add the coffee without mixing it with the water. Do not mix it, just let it get into the ...


7

Have you actually boiled it three times? Boiling coffee makes it smell like old floor rags, don't do that! What the Turkish method essentially is, you bring your coffee pot thrice up to, but not actually reaching, the boiling temperature, and you must never ever stir it. My favourite temperature is 70°C near bottom (measured with an electronic meat ...


6

This isn't no fancy tools, but it is no expensive fancy tools and the results are pretty darn authentic. I make pretty reasonable cappucinos with: A cheap moka pot for the coffee. Makes strong almost-espresso shots of coffee, and doesn't need any electricity, just sits on the stove (good for me because power blackouts are common here) A cheap battery-...


5

Well, if you want to make the Viennese original, all you do is combine coffee and sweetened cream, the latter possibly whipped. The coffee can be brewed however you wish, although instant is probably not entirely authentic. :) You can add cinnamon and/or shaved chocolate, if desired. If you want to make the modern definition of cappuccino, it's based on ...


5

Tannins produce foam in tea, and also streams and rivers.


5

In the referenced mousse recipes (there is more than one in that dessert), the vast majority of the foaminess will come from the whipped cream. You need to ensure that your cream is beaten properly to maximize foaminess, that is air volume: Chill your working equipment, including the bowl, whisk, and of course the cream itself If whipping by hand, use a ...


4

There are likely two or three things happening. When clear liquids come out of a microwave, it is quite common for it to froth as soon as you put something into it. A spoon, or crystals of salt or sugar forms nucleation sites for over-energised water molecules to make vapour bubbles. Water forms vapour at any temperature, not just at its boiling point. In ...


4

I've had success with making milk foam using a mason jar. Put a cup of milk (whole, skim, 2%, whichever you prefer) in the jar and close it tightly. Shake the jar vigorously until you have the amount of foam you want. Immediately place the jar in a microwave (removing the metal cap) and cook for 30 seconds on high. Now you can scoop the foam out with a spoon ...


4

Get an ISI whipper (no affiliation), the model that can take both hot and cold. It accepts CO2 or N2O. They have multiple safety controls built in, are versatile (especially given your interest in Heston), come in multiple sizes, and are relatively easy to clean.


4

I don't know what exactly it is about citrus - whether a particular combination of proteins, essential oils, lots of small particulates, or something else - but in my experience this is common to many citrus fruit. It seems to be a general property that they capture gas bubbles very effectively, leading to froth. Citrus froths impressively whenever it's ...


3

I learned to make this with chilled evaporated milk and icy cold mizing bowl and beaters. It's been a while but the hot water was half the recipe amount, stirring to disolve the jello. Let it cool while you beat the milk to stiff peaks only. The trick was to gently but thoughly mix the jello and whipped milk. That way the jello is not well incorporated ...


3

The main point is: do not let the coffee boil. When foam starts to form, remove it with a spoon and pour into your coffee cup.


3

You need something to froth the milk. You can't really do it without some sort of specialist tools but there are some cheap handheld things (e.g. battery-powered whisks - which don't work very well; hand-pumped frothers which look rather like a cafetiere - I've never tried one). "Milk frother" looks like a good search term. You're not going to get an ...


3

You can, somewhat surprisingly, froth milk with a (clean) French press (aka Cafetière) too (OP says he/she has a French press). So much so that some friends who drink milk in coffee (I don't) have miniature French presses for this purpose. Simply heat a small amount of milk (if you can remove the glass from your French press, microwave it in that), ...


3

Kraft has a recipe that resembles what you describe, in which you could substitute whipped evaporated: 3/4 cup boiling water 1 package (3 oz.) JELL-O ice cubes 1/2 cup cold water 1/2 cup Cool Whip Add boiling water to gelatin mix in a medium bowl; stir 2 minutes, until completely dissolved. Pour into blender. Add enough ice to cold water to measure 1-1/4 ...


2

Warning - speculative answer, here. Both Jolenealaska's link and Dorothy's second answer have the jello set with boiling water, chilled until semi-firm, and then added to the evaporated milk (or whipped cream). This should make a light, fluffy dessert with the right flavor profile. To make it come out in two layers, though, seems trickier - either ending ...


2

There's nothing to worry about when you see the foam appear. When hot water comes in contact with tea, it extracts the amino acids and proteins that result in such foam. The reason that you get more foam on the surface is when you microwave the water is perhaps dip the bag in hot water. When you put the tea bag in the cup first, part of the bubbles that ...


2

The foam is accumulated proteins—mostly albumen—that comes off of the meat and bones. The main reason to remove it is that it is unsightly and unpleasant aesthetically. It isn't unsafe, just ugly.


2

First of all you are better off with Xanthan Gum instead of gelatin. Xanthan gum is relatively heat stable whereas gelatin is renowned for its inability to withstand any heat above 35 °C. 200g parmesan grated (including rind). 400ml full fat milk. 1 tbsp soy lecithin. Bring to simmer 5 min, then blend and pass through fine sieve. Taste for seasoning now, ...


2

I think what you're looking for is "JELLO 123 "


1

Evaporated milk, jello. Make jello with only half the water required. Add evaporated milk 3:1 milk water ratio Beat with mixer. Place in refrigerator to set. Every so often (about every 20 minutes the first hour) beat with mixer until just before firmly set. My mother called this fluff. I think it resembles some flummeries.


1

It’s easy.... bring water to boil and when it’s boiling set aside. Add coffee (I use two teaspoons for each coffee cup- cups are similar to what you’re showing in your picture, about same size as espresso cups or slightly larger). Stir gently, but only couple of time, so coffee grounds come in contact with boiled water. By now, you should notice a dark foam ...


1

There are several ways to make foams, depending upon whether you want a hot or cold application. XANTHAN GUM can be used to replicate the binding effect usually provided by the fat of whipping cream so that it is now possible to create an incredibly tasty low-fat whipped cream. By adding 1 gr XANTHAN GUM to 1 cup of half-n-half and 1 cup of low fat milk and ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible