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8

Yes, you can mix red and white fondant to make pink fondant, red is just white that's dyed so mixing red into white will dilute the red dye. It takes a lot of dye to get a strong red color but very little to get pink, so start with 10% red to 90% white first and see how you get.


7

Pretzel sticks sound promising! The normal sized ones aren't quite 10-15cm, but there are longer ones out there. You could also look for Pocky or some other kind of cookie stick - sometimes things like that are sold as edible coffee stirrers (maybe coated with chocolate). If you can't find any of that, it should all be easy enough to make yourself; pretty ...


5

There's really no point to freezing them, because once you take them out of the freezer, they start to accumulate moisture, which will cause the fondant to melt, or at least get all goopy, as you said. The only way to avoid this when you freeze them is to wrap them airtight, but you have to leave them totally wrapped until they thaw, so why bother? I would ...


4

For something a little more durable than pretzels or cookies, I generally suggest candy canes, especially if you can find the un-bent 'peppermint stick' style. Unfortunately, they're a little harder to come by at this time of year. You might also be able to glue together a bunch of spaghetti or linguini to make it stronger ... either use egg whites or a ...


3

Marshmallows are a white, fluffy candy, that easily melts and becomes sticky. They are almost all sugar (and corn syrup which is also sugar), with whipped gelatine. They're vanilla flavored, usually with clear vanillin, because the pure whiteness is the very essence of the candy. They're sometimes colored, but not usually: The little ones are often served ...


3

Since you say that you know they're edible, I'd say that the tooth and crown are most likely made of gum paste, not fondant. The curves on the points of the crown would likely droop really badly if made of fondant because it never solidifies. Gum paste does. So, once you have it molded to the shape you want, you let it dry out and then it stiffens to a ...


3

Butter cream consists mostly of almost water-free fat (butter or shortening) and sugar. Whipped cream has about 30% fat, the remaining part is solids and mostly water. Everything that has significant amount of water will dissolve fondant since fondant consists of sugar. For example, cream, yoghurt, cream cheese, mascarpone and pudding (custard) are out. ...


3

Make them out of fondant, and then freeze them, Make sure you have extra long tree trunks When you are ready to serve, poke in the palms and candles and no problem Kids like frozen fondant too!


3

Most often they are called tuiles and they can be made in a number of ways, in some cases they are biscuit based or they can be made by melting sugar on a non-stick surface. and then cutting while the sugar is still warm and pliable. If you wanted to make a classic biscuity tuile there is a recipe here: http://www.finecooking.com/recipes/classic-tuile-...


2

I have done a couple of 3 tiered wedding cakes. I would recommend using something stronger than plastic straws, mainly for your peace of mind. You will be putting a lot of effort into the cakes and like @Joe said, the straws can be useless if crushed or deflected. If you want to use the straws so that the wooden skewer doesn't touch the cake, you can always ...


2

Powdered sugar is about 3% corn starch by weight. So the candies set due to a combination of three factors: Drying Protein network from the egg white albumen Thickening provided by the corn starch There is some minimal health risk from the raw egg, as it is possible it was infected with salmonella. The actual incidence, at least in the US, is very low, ...


2

I asked a professional cake maker at the shop where I buy my cake ingredients and got told not to pour the ganache for the effect that I was trying to achieve. I got my results by following method: First, I applied the ganache as usual, following the traditional method. Then I dipped my hands in hot water and smoothed the ganache with the wet hands In ...


2

There is no reason pouring ganache wouldn't work for this. 50/50 cream to bittersweet chocolate will work just fine. Just move quickly while the ganache is warm - you shouldn't have any problem at all. here's a picture of a cake iced by pouring 50/50 ganache: 50/50 poured ganache sets firm in the sense that it stays put once it has cooled. Considering the ...


2

Yes, it will make it darker and more brown than white. It may also affect any colours you add, adding a slight brown tinge to them.


2

It looks like that's a chocolate transfer sheet, which is just a very thin layer of chocolate with patterns printed onto it and then baked Here's a link I found of someone doing this at home: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/105238-demo-making-chocolate-transfer-sheets/


2

Without more details from you... Try kneading the fondant more to make it more pliable and soft. Work quickly after kneading. Roll the fondant a touch thicker. Try using less icing sugar/cornstarch if you are using these during rolling out. Freeze your cake for a bit to stiffen the structure to avoid edges cutting into fondant sheet. Gently adhere the ...


1

Glycerine's functionality is a "moisturizer", in that it's very good at keeping moisture for a long period. In the case of fondant, it will help to keep it pliable for a longer period and help to minimize drying out too quickly when working with it (rolling out, icing sugar/cornstarch, application). It also slightly helps any sugars from crystallizing, which ...


1

Confit and fondant potatoes have different cooking methods. Fondant potatoes are fried with oil on one side and with butter on the orher side, and then boiled in stock. Confit potatoes are deep fried at low temperature.


1

Yeah, the main difference is that fondant has a different shape and the crisp top and bottom verses the evenly cooked and consistant texture to confit. Also typically confit is slightly more seasoned.


1

If you are allowed to take the cake you can do the following: 1) Ganache the cake after you reach India, preferably indoors as it will melt as you take it along the road. 2) To take the cake along with you during the time of your flight just put it in a ziploc bag and seal it well and it should remain intact and not go bad after you arrive, However, make ...


1

I often soften Fondant by microwaving it for between 5-20 seconds. This does work on fondant that hasn't been left for more than 2 months. Once fondant has been left for this long, albeit in an airtight container, it isn't likely to be salvageable. Most manufacturers of fondant quote 2 months as the lifetime of fondant stored in an airtight container.


1

I assume you mean more glycerine, since glycerine is already in your recipe. Add a little, knead it, add a little, knead it. You don't want to add too much: fondant is supposed to be firm, though not crumbly. I always use this recipe. It seems simpler.


1

Yes, freezing fondant is fine if it is well wrapped, although doing so is not normally necessary as it is so high in sugar that it is essentially shelf stable. The main issue is that when you thaw it, you want it to be well wrapped so that condensation does not get onto the surface of the fondant itself, making it sticky.


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