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11

Chocolate fondue is well known but not really an alternative, more like a dessert (if there is any appetite left!) There are other dishes which involve having the guests dip some solid food in a mostly liquid component themselves and immediately eat the result: Chinese hot pot (incidentally called “fondue chinoise” in French) Fondue bourguignonne (beef) ...


7

The magic is from Sodium Citrate Most mass produced cheese it based on "cheddar blends". Basically large (50 Kg to 1 Mg) blocks of cheese are made in a milk factory. When a consumer product is to be made from it, the cheddar is shredded, flavour and/or culture is added, and then using heat and pressure it is re-packed into consumer sized packages In some ...


6

There are many ways to fondue. I like Escoce's chocolate answer. Really, you just need any liquid in which people can dunk their food. Cheese is a popular choice because it goes well with so many foods, but you have a whole world of other options. I went to a fondue restaurant once and they had pots of oil, broth, wine, etc. available for guests to cook ...


5

The advertised reason is that the alcohol will cut some of the protein chains resulting in a fondue that is dippable and not so stringy. Obviously the alcoholic beverage of choice will also add a lot of cheese-compatible flavor as well. Fondue recipes that don't include alcohol universally call for acid to achieve a similar effect.


5

I have a setup similar to what you're proposing, except made for fondues. It works very well, except it is set up for 4 tea candles. 1 or 2 is not sufficient unless you have a very small pot or eat very quickly. 4 candles keeps it at the right temperature for ~1.5 hours. Using a cast iron pot is also optimal since they retain heat so well. If you're ...


5

Sounds like they were using タブレット型固形燃料 taburetto-gata kokeinenryou, literally "tablet-shaped solid fuel": (courtesy メシ通) The market leader is a company called Nitinen, who offer a wide range of different sizes and shapes. The primary ingredients are methanol and alcohol, blended with fat in much the same way as soap.


4

I was taught to make cheese fondue in Switzerland and also have a fondue cookbook and I've never seen or heard of sauces being used with cheese fondue. I would fill the containers with bread for cheese fondue, sauces for meat fondue and fruit and cake for chocolate fondue.


4

The short answer is: you cannot get the butter out. The milk solids from the butter will be throughout the mixture, and the sheen on top may not be just milk fat from butter, but some cocoa butter as well. Even if you do try to skim the butter off the top, the remaining chocolate will never have the same quality as it did before. Some options: Reheat ...


3

For a fondue bourguignonne (oil) or Chinoise (broth), raw ingredients are cooked in the pot, which means you need to get the liquid at least close to a boil, i.e. in the 90-100 C range. The burner under your model should easily supply enough heat. For chocolate fondue, this would mean the chocolate would burn almost instantly. If you serve a chocolate ...


3

Unlike the other answers, I'd completely skip the part where it has to work like fondue. It's more important that it matches the food you already have. You already have bread and white wine. Have some slices of bread ready, add some grapes and nuts, something to put on the bread (thinly sliced smoked bacon?) and self serve salads which some of the other ...


3

IMO, Unless you have extra fondue "setup", it will be hard to accommodate your friend. You could do a Chinese "hot pot" (hot broth) with thinly sliced meat (beef, chicken...) You could do a fondue "Bourguignone" (with oil) with cubed meat (mostly beef).


3

Any variation of the swiss holy trinity (lardon, cheese and potatoes) is good, but for maximum wow factor, see if you can rent a raclette oven or two and have someone stand by it and slide the molten cheese on people's plates : Downside is you need a raclette officer on duty (can be done by anyone, its not hard)


2

Have a google for Raclette or Tartiflette (or anything from the Savoyard region of France). Most mountainous dishes involve the involve the cheese "Reblochon" over some form of boiled potatoes. Although once considered the poor mans dish in the mountains, they are now vastly populor and there are many variations for the reciepe online. My reciepe is: Rub ...


2

A small fuel burner like this would work great: https://www.amazon.com/Swissmar-KF-63011-Fondue-Burner/dp/B000UM2X76 Both the implement and the fuel are pretty cheap. Otherwise a portable burner, either electric or gas is great and you can use your regular pots and pans: https://www.amazon.com/Courant-Electric-Countertop-Hotplate-Portable/dp/B07CZ67Y7Y/ ...


2

No extra sauces for cheese fondue. Though it is common to have cornichons, pickled small onions and other pickles, as well as bacon, ham and whatever you like with melted cheese on the table. Not in the fondue! Some people like to use vegetables instead of bread, which I find a bit risky as you don't want lost pieces of such in the fondue. But you can have ...


2

Most proteins undergo irreversible structural changes when heated. The exact temperature where this happens depends on the protein. In most cases, no covalent bonds are broken or formed during this 'denaturation' process. But the irreversible nature of the changes means that there's no good way to rescue a curdled fondue sauce (or a curdled egg custard). ...


2

Chocolate fondue would be great to offer AND many of your other guests may end up on the chocolate fountain instead of the cheese.


2

While I am not certain if any of these ingredients were in the brand of cheese you bought, I figured you may be interested to hear that according to Heston Blumenthal there is two ingredients, in addition to cheese, you need to make a good fondue. One is acid, which will keep the protein from "clumping together", in the recipe I saw he used a bit of white ...


2

Your family will notice if you try to "Pull it back to edible" (that sounds disgusting). Maybe use something a little more acidic next time, like a dry wine, or just a touch of lemon (not much!) if you insist on using beer. It does sound like the heat was a little too high though if you're getting the infamous ball-o-cheese fondue, so turn the fire down, ...


2

I suspect that your cheese curdled. This happens to me if I overheat the mixture- especially in the presence of acid. (I don't have any experience with using beer.) The cornstarch is there as a safety net to prevent this but obviously it is not infallible. Turn down the heat and try adding a little more corn starch- it may not get back to perfect fondue ...


2

White wine has a pH of 3 to 4 and is acidic enough to curdle milk and the milk proteins in cheese. The key to success is to choose a wine that is not too "dry", heat it first to drive off the volatile acids and then gradually add the grated cheeses while stirring constantly. If the cheese curdles you're done. I've never been able to reverse it. Start over.


2

In my experience, the lowest setting of my induction cooker - 120 watts - is too high and results in scorched chocolate and will also burn dairy products like a cheese sauce. I wouldn't use it for a fondue - I would use a candle. It's possible this restaurant had specialty induction cookers that could reach lower temperatures. My single-burner el cheapo ...


2

You can either maintain the heat level through a heat source served with the food at the table or you can add a neutral-tasting oil to the chocolate mixture such as canola(rape seed) or vegetable oil. Adding another fat will also help in preventing scorching of the chocolate. Also the addition of some dairy to create a chocolate "sauce" can be a solution ...


1

My mother used to make canned tomato soup with a canfull of shredded cheese (cheddar, typically) instead of milk, producing something like extremely thick, rich tomato soup, served as fondue. This is a long shot because it's still got a lot of cheese in it, but the taste strikes me as more creamy and tomato-y than cheesy, so it might be worth serving as one ...


1

Since you said some cheese is acceptable, you could try looking for recipes for Onion fondue, which generally contains a little bit of cheese and a lot of onions. Other than that, it's also a French style recipe and will probably fit quite well with your existing fondue dippers. Alternatively, soup has been mentioned before. There's a lot of recipes for ...


1

I recommend a butternut or other winter squash puree. Roast squash with fresh garlic, shallot or white onion, and oil. Cool. Puree until smooth. Season to taste with salt, lemon juice for slight tartness, a dollop of dijon mustard, cayenne pepper, and fresh herbs such as thyme or sage. If you have miso or vegetable stock/bouillon on hand, a little bit would ...


1

There are several other foods that can be made to a similar consistency. However, I am not sure I would call these fondues and it would require some invention. While neither of these are traditional (and hopefully they don't offend anyone), they may have the ability as a base to give a similar consistency to cheese fondue (similar, obviously cheese is ...


1

I recently made a thick cauliflower soup, and I think it would make a good proxy for a savory fondue. If you use a rich chicken stock and a few potatoes, it will have good thickness like a fondue and a similar color as well.


1

You can also take the standard Swiss fondue recipe moitié-moitié and use all Emmental instead of 1/2 Gruyere and 1/2 Emmental. This came in handy when looking for a way to make fondue for a person who needs to avoid all dairy products from cow and goat milk. In Switzerland, I was lucky enough to find sheep Emmental. I'm not Swiss but I was happy with the ...


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