93

In Germany we have an old (joking) saying that roughly translates to "head off, tail off - bunny", so your question is legitimate. But first thing's first: There is no health risk1 involved if you ate the latest shipment of "meowling rabbit". (To cat lovers everywhere: This is no endorsement, I have a much loved and pampered cat, too!) The most obvious ...


53

As was mentioned, this is a kohlrabi. I felt more explanation should be given based on the fascinating nature of this plant. Kohlrabi is one of the handful of cultivars of brassica oleracea. Others include: cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, kale, Brussels sprouts, collard greens, savoy, kohlrabi, and gai lan. Brassica Oleracea (Wikipedia) Brassica ...


44

That actually are tips of trees, probably spruce1. It’s this year’s new growth and a very seasonal product. The tips are harvested when the are (about) fully grown, but still light green and soft. I can’t say for sure what the local customers would use them for, but one of the common uses in my area of the world is to make “honey”, i.e. a syrup by either ...


42

In the textbook Text-book of meat hygiene: with special consideration to ante-mortem and post-mortem inspection of food-producing animals (Edelmann & Eichorn, 1908), pages 64-65 concern determining the difference between a cat and rabbit: The following differences in the skeleton are especially to be mentioned: The lateral processes of the lumbar ...


41

What you're describing sounds like jallab. From Will Travel For Food: Jallab is a very popular drink in the Middle East. It’s made by diluting the syrup made of grape molasses, dates and rose water with water and serving it in a tall glass with crushed ice. It’s always topped with nuts, most of the time pine nuts and golden raisins, because a jallab ...


40

It looks like it could be yuca/cassava, based on the appearance alone. (Note: this is not the same as or related to yucca.) The picture on Wikipedia even shows a waxed version. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cassava


37

That is a chioggia beet, I believe, but watermelon radish is also colored similarly.


33

The simplest way to tell the difference is to look at the ribs. Cats have one pair of floating ribs, but rabbits have three pairs. The floating ribs are the ones at the bottom (i.e. towards the tail), that are not attached to anything at their outer end. All the other ribs are either attached directly to the breastbone, or to the cartilage that extends from ...


33

I'm French, and I happen to know someone that uses this kind of spruce tips to make alcohol. It's well-known in the Alps region of France. People tend to use these things to make "sapinette" (which means "small spruce"), a liquor appreciated by many peoples. They let the spruce tips extract their flavour in a prepared-in-advance alcohol. As for the final ...


25

That's most likely Jallab though not a quintessential Israeli drink it is part of the middle eastern cuisine. Jallab (Arabic: جلاب / ALA-LC: jallāb) is a type of fruit syrup popular in the Middle East made from carob, dates, grape molasses and rose water. Jallab is very popular in Jordan, Syria, Palestine and Lebanon. It is made mainly of grape molasses, ...


23

The picture isn't from the best angle for identification, though it's very pretty, but it looks to be a pea shoot (picture). These are common garnishes for savoury dishes, but much less common for sweet dishes, though not completely unknown (also a lemon recipe).


21

Kohlrabi. Basically a form of turnip.


20

If it is high quality imitation lobster and you are not amongst the highest skilled tasters (few of us are), you won't be able to tell the difference by yourself. Imitation seafood is made from surimi, which is made from various whitefishes (most often Alaskan Pollock). The surimi is mechanically formed, colored and flavored to look like whatever species ...


19

The bone structure is an excellent clue -- each of these three cuts have completely different bones -- and you should be able to learn to distinguish the muscle structures easily as well. (There's almost certainly a price difference, too -- I'd expect a shoulder steak to be the cheapest, followed by leg, then loin and rib.) I've made some quick structural ...


18

That item in the bottom right is Tamago nigiri, a slice of omelette on top of seasoned rice.


18

These are very similar to potato croquettes, for which there are tons of recipes. Those are usually made with mashed potatoes instead of shredded, but otherwise pretty much the same deal. You can find recipes with varying amounts of creamy things and cheese; I'm guessing the Omaha Steaks ones are on the higher end of that. If you want to try to match the ...


17

This is actually the Turkish method for making coffee, or a variant of it. Coffee grounds, cold water and sugar are brought just to a boil several times before being poured into small cups. For this method one typically uses the finest possible grind of coffee. The sand is used to control heat. The pots (called cezve) on top of the sand keep warm, and when ...


15

You can do this with an air pump, egg white powder and xanthan gum :) http://www.molecularrecipes.com/culinary-foams-class/bubbles-air-pump/ The “bubbles with air pump” technique consists of injecting air using a fish tank air pump into a liquid with some viscosity. It works great with light syrups and juices by just adding a little egg white powder and ...


14

This Chocolate is Van-Leer semi sweet. It was an old American chocolate manufacturer that was recently purchased by Callebaut. It does have a distinct slab style. This is available in the bulk section at Winco. Here's a picture: You can also order it online here


14

Based on your photo, this is most likely a wagashi (Japanese sweet) called daifuku in Japanese. It's got an outer layer made from cooked glutinous rice that has been pounded and kneaded aggressively until smooth, which is called mochi. The inside is often a red bean paste made from a bean called azuki in Japanese (or adzuki in an odd English-language ...


13

That is a buckeye, fruit of Aesculus glabra, also known as the Ohio buckeye tree. The seeds (the "buckeye" part) look sort of like a horse chestnut, but the fruit is different. Do not eat it! The fruits contain tannic acid, and are poisonous to cattle, and humans, as is the foliage. (Wikipedia) (You can, however, make buckeye candy: peanut butter balls ...


12

That is Classic Series Guava Candy made by HongYuan. You can buy a 14oz bag on Amazon, here.


11

This spice is called "Kalpaasi" in Tamilian cuisine. I use it in my chicken gravy, mutton gravy and for few vegetarian recipes too. I use kalpasi when I season some of my chutney varieties. It releases a strong curry smell the moment you add it in hot oil. This spice grows inside water wells absorbing pure air (from what I heard from my aunt when I was ...


11

"高麗" is the ancient name of Korea. However, "高麗菜" (where "菜" means vegetable) has nothing to do with Korea, but just how people call cabbage in Taiwan and Fujian. (It's unclear why people use this phrase.) The making process involve drying the cabbage leaves in the sun, so it's called "乾" (in simplified Chinese "干"), which is the name of the Sky in the Bagua,...


11

This is a staple of Balkan cuisine. You will see it named Lángos (and derivatives) in Hungary and Mekitza (and derivatives) in Slavic languages. Either of these words is used in Western Europe, depending on which group popularized it there. I am not sure this wording has spread outside of Europe, and cannot say if it was imported in the USA or developed ...


11

They are called 'fir tree buds' ("muguri de brad") - young tips of branches. they are used to make a syrup that is believed to have health properties - antibiotic, antiseptic, metabolism stimulator, etc. (pic taken from this link: https://www.realitatea.net/sirop-muguri-de-brad_1939056.html )


10

Bamboo isn't a tree, it's a grass ;) A bamboo shoot is just the budding new bamboo that's harvested before it grows and becomes hard and stringy. Bamboo shoots are generally available in 2 forms, fresh and canned. Fresh ones are sold whole and generally used in stir fries. Canned bamboo shoots are precooked and packed in water. You can find canned bamboo ...


10

Those are the chicken oysters -- muscle meat, not organ meat. I'm glad you've learnt to enjoy them by intuition, as they are indeed a prized portion of the chicken. Wikipedia tells me the French call this portion sot-l'y-laisse: "(only) a fool leaves it there", because it is little known, easily missed, and much prized.


10

This most likely means waxy potatoes, typically white or red. In some contexts it might also mean you want small ones so that you can boil and serve them whole, but it doesn't look like that's the case here. There are two main kinds of potatoes, starchy and waxy. Starchy ones (like russets) cook up fluffy and dry, desirable for things like baked potatoes ...


10

I've never been to Old Wild West but that looks very much like "fry sauce" or "secret sauce" as we use them here in the United States. In looking at Old Wild West's website, it appears to be geared around offering traditional US style burgers, fries, steaks, ribs, etc. so the inclusion of US style fry sauce would make sense. Here is a link to a typical ...


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