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29

You don't realize it, but you've asked a hot-button question. Expect to get lots of comments about botulism, etc. This is a result of a report a few years back about folks getting botulism from homemade garlic oil. I'll keep my answer practical. First, depending on where you live, your state, city, county, or other regional government may already have ...


26

The short answer is: No. The more elaborate answer is that certain bacteria are anaerobic and food needs to be heat treated to ensure it can be safely stored. Especial mention: Clostridium botulinum which leaves deadly toxins. The tealight inside the jar will not produce the heat needed for pasteurization.


21

Alcohol is a disinfectant, so any bacteria sitting around for a month in vodka have been thoroughly killed... The only thing to worry about is that if some of the chillies were not completely submerged all of the time, you might have a slight problem. The symptoms to look for is discolouring: look for brown / black spots / extremities. If not: no worries: ...


21

These are two different ways to preserve food. The canned salmon was boiled and then sealed into a can while it was still boiling sealed into a can and boiled under a specified combination of time and temperature that has been empirically proven to kill enough bacteria. All the bacteria in the can are dead, and no more can get in, so it's sterile and won't ...


18

As Fabby notes in their answer, alcohol is an excellent preservative. As long as your peppers are fully submerged, it's extremely unlikely that they could rot or spoil in any way. (If they aren't, there's a risk that mold or something could grow on the exposed parts, but even that's fairly low if all the surfaces have been at least temporarily in contact ...


13

Canned salmon is sterilized. Sterilization uses heat to render a product safe. Cured hams are preserved with salt, and nitrites in some cases. Some hams are also cooked. Furthermore, some fish is salted and dried for curing purposes. Salt and drying greatly reduce water activity to render a product safe. Two different processes, both create a safe product.


11

The US FDA has a handy Refrigerator and Freezer Storage Chart that might help you. In general your "leftovers" have a 3 to 4 day shelf life...I would think that includes your thawed strawberries.


8

Yes, it tastes of celery. Celery is one of the three ingredients of mirepoix, the vegetable mix which is ubiquitous in French cuisine and has spread to many others. Current large-scale food production rarely includes slicing fresh vegetables into small cubes and browning them in a pan, but they try to add the ingredients in more convenient form. So, if you ...


7

You should have no problem using good quality frozen cod for salt cod. Freezing breaks up some of the tissues and changes the texture, notably making it drier as freezing drives out some of its moisture, so you might not need as much salt to dry it to the same level. In some places the "fresh" fish you see in the store has actually been frozen for the trip ...


6

Meat is... complicated. There are many factors here, but it helps to have an understanding of why freezing affects meat at all. The first impact is textural: ice crystals that form during freezing damage cell membranes within the meat. This primarily affects the muscle fibers that give meat its primary structure; connective tissues are tougher and less ...


6

Generally turning a jar upside down after filling is a alternative to a proper hot-water bath, not an addition to it. This is known as the inversion method, and is used by many cooks of jams, jellies, mustards, and other very-low-risk canned foods. The idea of inversion canning is that, by forcing the air in the jar through the hot liquid, you can kill and ...


6

Sage dries well, I dry mine by cutting off whole branches and hanging them up in a dry, warm place for a week. Once dried I strip off the leaves by hand. However, if I had a dehydrator I'd strip the leaves off the branches and then stick them in the dehydrator until they're crispy. It's no more complex than that.


5

No question that it is past the expiration date for freezer storage. What does that really mean? If it has remained frozen without any power outages, or thawed, refrozen kind of stuff.... then it stands to reason that the pie has never been exposed to a temperature which would breed (or encourage the growth of) bacteria. From that standpoint, yes, you can ...


5

You may want to look into canning your sauces at home. You could also freeze the sauces in portion sized amounts and only defrost what you will use that day. This would extend the shelf life, but they would still go bad as quickly once they're opened/defrosted. Unfortunately, there is a reason we use 'chemicals' to preserve food for longer shelf life. The ...


5

By USDA's own standards, dry cure bacon is room temperature safe, if sliced for 10 days, slab up to 3 weeks (see here). Would I do it, probably not, but it is classed as safe without refrigeration. The salt and nitrite levels in the product are high enough to keep pathogens killed for that long at levels the USDA calls safe and likely UK agencies are ...


5

It ferments, like every other food mixture, because there's microorganisms (bacteria and yeast) in the air and the ingredients that reproduce and consume the sugars and starches in it. Any jarred vegetable, fruit, or herb will ferment unless there is something specifically to prevent microorganism growth. You can't get rid of these just by washing the ...


4

It seems that you've already done some research on the subject, as you mention that it doesn't dry well. Searching for 'papalo' using an internet search engine found http://www.appalachianfeet.com/2010/05/07/how-to-grow-and-use-papalo-wrecipes/ : It doesn’t dry well, but it can be frozen if it is pureed with water or oil and put into ice cube trays. ...


4

You cannot preserve them without a change in taste and color. Freezing is the best you will get, and the changes you desecribe are normal. You can also dehydrate or pressure can them, but they will be even more different than fresh mushrooms then.


4

You say they started in the fridge, then you put them in the freezer, which is colder. If it would have been safe in the fridge, it will be safe in the freezer. So unless they had been hanging around in the fridge for a long time, they will be fine. Only you know what these bags of food were, and how long they'd been in the fridge, but most leftovers keep ...


4

The heat of your condiments isn't actually being lost. The condiments are marrying, meaning the heat becomes more homogenously distributed through the condiment. This means you don't have bits and pieces that have as high a spike in heat than the rest of the salsa, and therefore the condiment is more evenly hot (thought apparently cooler to the taster) ...


4

Freeze them raw. Prepare/portion/shape all the patties then put them on small square of parchment paper (or waxed paper) square in a single layer on a baking sheet and freeze them as fast as possible in your freezer. Once they are frozen, stack them an put them in a resealable bag.


4

Yes, any bean can be fermented. Black bean is common, for example, but you can certainly experiment. This site might be a good starting point. They recommend rehydration, then cooking, prior to fermentation. They recommend using yogurt, a commercial starter culture, or a brine from lacto-fermented vegetables to get the process going.


4

This layer just means some milk proteins have cooked onto the bottom of the pan, and says nothing at all about the age or condition of the milk. It's more likely when you boil a smaller quantity due to the more rapid heating. During can help avoid this. However repeated heating and cooling isn't generally a good idea. With milk you can get away with it but ...


3

My suggestion is: try simmering the sauce for a short while before storing it in the fridge. My answer is based on the sauce I use for my Fajitas (onion, assorted peppers, ground cumin and cayenne, cilantro, garlic, and lime juice with honey and butter for a touch of sweetness). It is heated through and coats pulled chicken. This sauce is rather spicy at ...


3

I don't know that outdoors would be the best place to store your home canned goods. Even in an insulated cabinet, that the sun doesn't hit, the temperature in the cabinet may rise in the summer above recommended levels. Also, humidity may rust your lids(and bands, if you leave them on). From Nation Center for Home Food Preservation Label and date the ...


3

The cooking method for the noodles you're using says: Allow 1 block of noodles per person. Plunge them into a pan of boiling water and simmer for 4 minutes. Drain well and toss in a splash of soy sauce. When serving as part of a stir-fry: Rinse in cold water, drain, then add to the wok, tossing all ingredients together just before serving ...


3

I recently got a box of dried fruits (including plums) from a friend. There was a note on the box: 'never mind the white crust, that's just sugar'. I'm quite sure your plums have sugar on their skin. Or maybe some dried potassium sorbate but nothing harmful.


3

Water, water-vapor or moisture can't penetrate the plastic bag. Nice tender bread contains a lot of moisture. That moisture, all of it, will evaporate into the relatively dry air in your kitchen if it can. Bread (especially a baguette) depleted of moisture becomes rock hard, as you know. If you cover your bread with a plastic bag, a little moisture still ...


3

There is no way to safely can dairy products to be shelf stable, without using industrial equipment and processes. If you plan on refrigerating it, the best by date on the dairy you use should be good. You need to check with your local health department for specific requirements.


3

The answer to your questions is 1) no, and 2) no. First, you cannot make shelf stable dairy products with canning, as Debbie M. explained in her answer. And even if you could, that would refer to a specific recipe known to create a shelf stable product, which has been tested to not develop any harmful pathogens, not to a recipe thought up at home. Second,...


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