61

What about a piping bag? Fill the bag with a spatula, pipe into the bottle.


33

Exposure to germs is the problem, once you open these they are exposed and the clock starts. If you vacuum seal you are vacuum sealing the germs in with the food, and not taking steps to kill the pathogens. Pouring into a sterilized container again just puts contaminated food into an uncontaminated container. The only way to make them shelf stable again ...


28

Traditionally (at least in Spain) garlic was kept in a braided string, hung in a dry place, so that they could last until the following season. Separating them in cloves will cause them to dry prematurely.


24

As you state, you have not followed any canning procedures, so you don't get any more storage time than the standard recommendation. Glass vs plastic doesn't matter. So, I would just recommend freezing. Tomatoes, and tomato based sauces for that matter, freeze nicely. If you use freezer, zip-style bags, you can freeze them flat. They will then thaw ...


12

The important part of the system are the lids. The ideal lids are the Mason-type (no matter which company produced them), with a flat top and a separate side piece with thread. Another type that works is the older Weck style jar, which consists of a glass jar with glass lid, plus rubber steal and metal clamps, no threads. This system is as safe as the ...


12

Edited: Concerns were expressed about such items being suited for food use. I've added comments in the text on "Food Grade" items plus a note at the end. How can I get a very thick or viscous paste (e.g. caramel, ganache, thick mayonnaise) into small-necked squeeze bottles without heating it up? Consider using a "grease gun" as used by mechanics. These ...


11

Anyone here who gives you an estimate beyond what a typical (non-canned) refrigerated sauce would last is just going to be speculating. The thing about canning recipes from reputable sources is that they are tested scientifically. They often run hundreds of trials with testers for a particular recipe, then test each for bacterial growth, etc., before ...


10

There are thick food grade syringes being made for that kind of application.. https://www.amazon.com/Syringes/dp/B07C71C1LH/ The plunger comes out at the back easily, so you can pour your sauce into the syringe, and then inject it into your dispensing bottle.


9

Shelf-stable wet foods in cans, jars, plastic pouches, and the like are generally sterilized by heating them under pressure, to the point where literally every microorganism that might be inside dies. The containers need to remain sealed to maintain the sterility -- verifying the seal is the purpose of the little "pops up" button on the top of jars which are ...


9

The first question is maybe how long they should last after opening? A week or two? Months? Years? The second question is IMHO the "mode" of spoiling for that produce and what conservation agents are there already. For some produce this is quite doable: sugar as conservation agent: Syrups with sufficiently high sugar content (> 80 % or so, that is like ...


8

Most advice I see is to keep the head whole, keep it in the dark, and avoid moisture. This will allow you to keep garlic for several months. In my kitchen, I go through several heads of garlic over the course of just one month, so long term storage is not really that critical for me. I suspect, technically, you would shorten the life span a bit. Whether or ...


7

You can separate them and cut off the end and freeze them. We do this all the time. I use a garlic press to use them when needed even while it's frozen. They seem to last forever.


7

Simply hanging meat likely won't result in a safe drying environment. The moist, room temperature surface is the environment that bacteria and mold thrive in, which is why holding food at room temperature is considered unsafe. Alton Brown offers a method for homemade beef jerky without any specialized equipment, but does make use of a box fan and air ...


6

I just spoke with someone from Presto - apparently, the pressure is meant to be maintained by adjusting the heat source, and the weight provided with the canner is meant only to build pressure and not as a regulator. They also recommend against adjusting the weight in order to achieve in-between pressures. Not sure why on that last point - I'll follow up ...


5

Similar to the other suggestions, you can use a large mouth water bottle, sports drink bottle, or restaurant style condiment bottle as a syringe. I've used a large mouth funnel into one of these with dry ingredients, then put the lid/cap back on to use as a squirt bottle. If the bottle doesn't already have an opening, you can make one with a drill or knife. ...


5

A wierd idea - if you squeeze the bottle, put its neck into the paste while squzeed and then let go, it will suck up the food inside? :o


5

Well, Sandor Ellix Katz writes in The Art of Fermentation that some mould on the top is not a problem, you can scrape it away. But for me, this seems too much, I would not eat it. From what I see on your picture, your problem might be, that the kraut is not covered with liquid. For fermentation you need anaerobic conditions, meaning that the kraut is not ...


4

For home pressure canning, you should always use a Mason jar (Ball is one brand, but there are others). A "Mason jar" is the kind with the two-piece lid. When using home equipment, the two-piece lid is important because it will seal properly inside the pressure vessel. If you use a jar with a one-piece lid, such as in your photo, the lid tightness needs to ...


4

Breaking them apart to put in a jar - I see several issues. You will almost certainly break through the skin on a good percentage of them as you separate them into individual cloves, meaning they will have lost their protective layer. Unless the jar has some kind of desiccant, there is potential for the garlic to sweat & go off rapidly. The air inside ...


4

I'll add an answer that doesn't address your question directly, but does address the underlying concern: If patrons regularly discard part of the dish, you should ask why. With hard boiled eggs cooked in a large scale cafeteria kitchen it's easy to overcook the eggs, just leaving them in the water for hours on end. This results in a greyish, crumbly and ...


4

In the book Advanced Bread and Pastry, Michael Suas outlines three methods that he recommends to professional bakers (but also applicable at home) for freezing bread at various stages, roughly in decreasing order of quality: Par-baked process. The bread or rolls are prepared normally and baked normally, but for a shorter amount of time (just until the ...


4

Try a little cooking spray (pan release) on the pan, or, another option would be to use a silicone mat.


4

There are lots of recipes for "air dried beef" online, many of which can be accomplished in an apartment. You will need equipment, some of which you likely already have. Some you can hack very inexpensively. The process goes like this: Slice meat Season and cure (you will need a refrigerator). I would also strongly suggest curing salt, also known as "...


3

There is no way at all to do that. If you made up your own recipe, pressure canning is out of the question. It is only safe for recipes which have been developed and tested with pressure canning in mind. Water bath canning is generally also only advised with recipes which have been developed and tested for canning, in order to ensure that you have both ...


3

You could ferment your eggs; salt-pickled fermented eggs are a thing and don't require any higher salt content than you already have. However, there are some potential problems with that. First, your comment that "a month later they've gone lacto on me. Probably safe, but I'm not a fan" gives the impression that you wouldn't like the result of fermentation....


3

A pressure cooker basically has two settings, high (about 12.5 psi for electric, and 15 psi for stovetop) and low (4 to 7 psi). There are no gauges to accurately specify the pressure in pressure cookers. Pressure canners, on the other hand, are generally larger, and are equipped with accurate gauges so that the user can measure the exact pressure inside the ...


3

That's correct. The greater surface area of ground coffee allows more trapped carbon dioxide to be released, taking aroma compounds with it, as well as making way for oxygen in the surrounding air to oxidize the aroma compounds and coffee oils.


3

You can freeze tallow. Dehydration and the freeze-thaw cycle of home freezers are the enemies of long term storage. You can't stop the freeze-thaw cycle, but if you minimize exposure to dehydration (freezer burn) by storing full containers, or even vacuum packing, you can keep them that way for quite a while. You added a picture, which is helpful. I ...


3

There's a specific term for reusing ingredients for stock twice: remouillage (which literally means a "rewetting"). Usually this "second stock" is not used directly for broth, as it has significantly less flavor than the primary stock. That said, depending on the type of bones, the amount of meat used in making the stock, etc., it may still have a very ...


3

It should be fine if you keep the individual clove skins on, the way I see it the outer skin doesn't really add that much extra protection compared to just the inner skin as long as it is not for very long periods. The bigger risk would be drying out, and it will dry out faster, but the inner skin should suffice as protection almost as effectively as the ...


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