53

One possible consideration is that some frozen desserts (most notably ice creams and sorbets) can be very difficult to scoop if your freezer is too cold. Optimal serving temperature for ice cream is between about 5 & 10°F (-15°C & -12°C); colder freezers may result in difficult scooping and/or needing to leave the ice cream out to thaw. The ...


34

Tubes like that are assembled with the bottom open (so at that point it's a cylinder, closed at the cap end), filled, and then folded and heat-sealed at the bottom. The filling is done with a rigid baster-like thing to minimize air bubbles. Here's a video of the process. There's no particular reason you couldn't do most of this at home, with the exception of ...


26

Yes, fruitcake will retain almost all the alcohol added to it, whether added before or after cooking. Whether you should make a non-alcoholic alternative is a matter of opinion and individual circumstances and not on-topic for this site, but if I were averse to consuming alcohol and someone who knew that about me sent me an alcohol-infused fruitcake, I would ...


14

There is little reason, aside from the obvious ones you already mention, to avoid the coldest setting. You might be concerned with scoop-ability of some frozen desserts, but that probably will not be too much of an issue for store-bought products, which are often stabilized for texture. Also, these can be removed in advance to temper. The Institute for ...


9

The question is rather difficult to answer since it is based on false assumptions. I will try addressing those. What process happens after 25-30 years which limits its shelf life? There is no reason to assume that there is such a process. Imagine that I tell you "tomorrow at 2 PM, I will be at home". This contains no information about whether I ...


8

I'm not totally certain whether you're trying to end up with room-temperature shelf-stable pesto. If so, you may have to look elsewhere. However, my family has grown bumper crops of basil before, and been left with the task of trying to preserve it for year-round pesto. You noted that making pesto and freezing it doesn't work well due to the Parmesan ...


8

Cook them in dishes. I use sun dried tomatoes in my go-to pasta sauce. While mine are usually in oil, I have used others in the past. I suggest thinking of them in the same way as anchovies. On their own, they can be near inedible, but when cooked in a dish, they almost dissolve into pure flavor. The same can be done with your tomatoes: After a while, ...


6

They are called squeeze tubes. for example : https://www.alltub.com/en-us/products/aluminum-squeeze-tubes/ And for how they are filled, I don't know, I assume it's mostly done by machines in product line.


6

The answer is a general "no", not just for eggs, but basically for any food. When you store it under the usual conditions, you already get the maximum shelf life possible. Methods of food preservation do not magically make the food last longer, they actually produce a different food that is shelf stable (e.g. turning vegetables into pickles). ...


6

I typically do one of two things when I'm dealing with my end of year basil crop (trying to use it before that first frost) : Freeze it: make pesto as normal, except for the cheese. Portion it out into some sort of small container, and freeze. I have an ice cube tray that I use specifically for this (as it would now make garlic-y ice cubes) and use 3 or 4 ...


4

There's probably not much difference. There is a fair amount of variation in preparation methods for Vietnamese preserved limes and lemons (chanh muối). The Garden Betty recipe you linked is probably the most common technique - soaking nearly-quartered lemons in heavily salted water for a few weeks - but that may not be the same method used for the $3 jar ...


4

I would freeze it. Crumble will defrost pretty much instantly when you take it out of the freezer, so you can just pour it straight from the freezer container onto your yogurt. If you freeze it on a tray and then dump it into a container, it should stay crumbly rather than freeze into a block so it's easy to handle.


4

Two minor considerations (but still is an answer) Even if your freezer can be set as low as -22, it is good to have some safety margin in regard to the freezer longevity. Most machines don't like being operated at their extreme settings and they are much safer by operating somewhat off the extreme. Both energy consumption and wear are expected to double or ...


4

In my experience, it's easy to accidentally burn very small pieces. Candying grated ginger is probably possible, but would require excellent temperature control to prevent burned ginger. I like to candy mandolined slices (on one of the thicker settings) for minimal effort. As for peeling, there are a number of "hacks" for how to do it easily. I ...


3

Dried ginger can be kept at room temperature, in any cool dark place (like your pantry), for months to years: Dried, ground, or crystallized ginger should be stored in a cool dark pantry in a sealed container. Spices with the moisture removed do not really go bad (unless they get wet), but they lose their potency over time and will no longer add flavor to ...


3

If it's darkening that begins at the top, then I reckon it's oxidation. Get air bubbles out first (vibration, tapping) then pick a technique to remove air or replace with nitrogen. Freezing would also slow oxidation but not ideal for many textures.


3

It depends on what equipment you have and what flavour compromises you're willing to make, each preservation method will have its own downsides. Freezing will give you good results, but you better make sure you vacuum pack the fruits to protect from freezer burn (might be counter productive if you have to re-seal it every day, or expensive if you use ...


3

Do what I've been doing for 10 years: freeze it in 4oz jelly jars, with 1/4" of headroom and a slick of oil on top. I have pesto that's been in the freezer for four years, and it's still quite good. Sealing it in the jars, with the oil, minimizes oxidation-related discoloration. If you're really concerned about it darkening, then you can blanch the ...


3

I agree with rumtscho's answer, believing the logic behind it. There is however one factor that could possibly have an effect, hinted at in the question: gas permeability of the package. They assume it's stored clean and dry, so we'll neglect water vapour. Nitrogen and CO2 are inert for our purposes, which leaves oxygen. Oxygen causes flavour molecules to ...


3

Besides the issues already mentioned, you should also beware of storing some dry goods in the fridge, especially if you live in a high-humidity area. Basically, every time you open the container outside of the fridge, you will exchange it for more humid air. In the fridge, the moisture will condense. If you're storing something in amounts similar to the ...


3

I know this is an old post, but yesterday I made Coffee Cherry Jelly and this recipe worked quite well. I took inspiration from the Yemeni recipe for Qishr and I used fresh coffee cherry skins that I had frozen after each harvesting batch of coffee. The recipe was: Put all the coffee cherry skins in a pot Fill the pot with filtered water to just cover the ...


3

tl;dr; The resources for this topic are terrible. The best I have come up with is reasoning from first principles. That reasoning suggests the probable temperature at which spores are destroyed is somewhere between 113.3C and 116.4C, but without a proper microbiology experiment it's hard to say with much certainty whether that's correct. Problems with ...


3

If you're working with something acidic like a jam, you can indeed process the jars in hot water. This is sufficient to kill any pathogens that got sealed in with the product and can thrive in an acidic, high-sugar environment like jam. Since the water bath also seals the jar, nothing can enter the sealed jars, the jam is now shelf-stable. In your case, the ...


3

There are two things that can happen if the freezer is too cold for extended periods of time: You'll get more ice build-up (especially with frequent use) and The food inside will have more freezer burn than expected Note that some more modern freezers have a "quick freeze" setting that drops the freezer temperature for a few hours and then ...


3

2-3 hours at an unknown temperature, which you assume (but cannot prove) that is 'near boiling' will not sterilize it. First, to kill all spores which might already be present, 100 C is not sufficient. You need to spend a certain number of time at a certain internal temperature above 100*, and that temperature will have to apply to all parts of the meat - I ...


3

Our baker suggests a stone ware or clay pot for storing bread and putting it with the cut, open side to the ground of the pot so that this side is protected and not in direct contact with the air. Using a bread bin or putting the bread in a linen bag into a bread bin also works very well. Usually we keep our bread fresh using these methods for a week, ...


2

Here's a (slightly abridged) translation of the recipe you found: (i) Select clean and fresh duck eggs with even shells.(ii) Other ingredients: glutinous (sticky) rice, wine lees, salt, brown sugar etc. (i) Soak the glutinous rice in water - 24 hours at 12C, an hour less for every 2C increase in temperature.(ii) Drain and rinse the rice. Steam for 10 ...


2

Many food items, particularly those containing oils, but many others too, will change characteristics when cold. The good news is that keeping honey and most other things at fridge temperature does not generally affect flavour, but it may affect texture permanently. Oils and other substances that can go rancid will generally keep better in the fridge than at ...


2

Yes, the contents should be discarded. Putting it in the refrigerator after the seal fails is too late. Time and temperature kill pathogens, so it's not so much the pressure as the through-and-through temperature of the food that matters... Something insulating in the beans could harbor bacteria. I've seen a fly grow an interesting little blob of an ...


2

Since you're putting the cabbage in a vinegar/water mixture, you are not fermenting it as sauerkraut (at least not initially), which would keep for months. Instead, you're relying on the acidity of the vinegar for preservation. The 50/50 mix you have there is plenty acid (est. pH of 2.8 or so), so even if fermentation doesn't start on its own it should be ...


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