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3

I don't think you are going to make this shelf-stable, which, in part, comes from the dramatic reduction of water activity in a product. Cooked hams are generally products that must remain refrigerated. They can last quite a while in the refrigerator, especially in the original packaging. For your purposes, the process is clearly explained in Douglas ...


1

You should try following a borts recipe. Borts is basically air dried cuts of meat(beef). Its recipe requires no equipment whatsoever and creates delicious strips of dried meat. The Mongols have been using this technique for centuries as a way of preserving meat for long periods of time without refrigeration. Here is a quick guide. Hope you enjoy!


7

Simply hanging meat likely won't result in a safe drying environment. The moist, room temperature surface is the environment that bacteria and mold thrive in, which is why holding food at room temperature is considered unsafe. Alton Brown offers a method for homemade beef jerky without any specialized equipment, but does make use of a box fan and air ...


4

There are lots of recipes for "air dried beef" online, many of which can be accomplished in an apartment. You will need equipment, some of which you likely already have. Some you can hack very inexpensively. The process goes like this: Slice meat Season and cure (you will need a refrigerator). I would also strongly suggest curing salt, also known as "...


0

Just air drying seems risky to me, even with the highest quality beef. You could make beef jerky though, provided you have an oven and some time on your hands. Seriouseats has a recipe for it.


9

The first question is maybe how long they should last after opening? A week or two? Months? Years? The second question is IMHO the "mode" of spoiling for that produce and what conservation agents are there already. For some produce this is quite doable: sugar as conservation agent: Syrups with sufficiently high sugar content (> 80 % or so, that is like ...


32

Exposure to germs is the problem, once you open these they are exposed and the clock starts. If you vacuum seal you are vacuum sealing the germs in with the food, and not taking steps to kill the pathogens. Pouring into a sterilized container again just puts contaminated food into an uncontaminated container. The only way to make them shelf stable again ...


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