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1

Athanasius is correct that any comment you'll get here is anecdotal at best - so here's my anecdote. We do exactly this regularly (we make a batch of Marinara, put it in a mason/bell jar with a standard canning lid directly from the stove, let cool, then put in the refrigerator or freezer). We don't get much more than a week, maybe 2 at most, before mold ...


11

Anyone here who gives you an estimate beyond what a typical (non-canned) refrigerated sauce would last is just going to be speculating. The thing about canning recipes from reputable sources is that they are tested scientifically. They often run hundreds of trials with testers for a particular recipe, then test each for bacterial growth, etc., before ...


24

As you state, you have not followed any canning procedures, so you don't get any more storage time than the standard recommendation. Glass vs plastic doesn't matter. So, I would just recommend freezing. Tomatoes, and tomato based sauces for that matter, freeze nicely. If you use freezer, zip-style bags, you can freeze them flat. They will then thaw ...


3

In the book Advanced Bread and Pastry, Michael Suas outlines three methods that he recommends to professional bakers (but also applicable at home) for freezing bread at various stages, roughly in decreasing order of quality: Par-baked process. The bread or rolls are prepared normally and baked normally, but for a shorter amount of time (just until the ...


2

I don't freeze large loaves often, but I freeze homemade bagels regularly, and baguettes or small batards occasionally. My personal preference is to freeze after the bread is baked and fully cooled; mostly to avoid dealing with any yeast issues related to freezing raw dough. Just wrap it in plastic wrap if you're only going to store it for a few days. For ...


1

I would freeze the dough before the second proof. And when you’re going to bake it, you can first defrost in the fridge and let it rise at room temperature before baking. This way you also ensure that your yeast is alive if it rises after being frozen.


3

You could ferment your eggs; salt-pickled fermented eggs are a thing and don't require any higher salt content than you already have. However, there are some potential problems with that. First, your comment that "a month later they've gone lacto on me. Probably safe, but I'm not a fan" gives the impression that you wouldn't like the result of fermentation....


1

I just want to clarify one element in response to this question's wording: food producers are not necessarily "sneaking" nitrates/nitrites into food. Another answer says that this is a misleading "attempt to pretend that nitrates are not being used." I initially thought that too. And it is true that some food producers may be "sneaking" these things past ...


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