New answers tagged

1

It's not even if it lasts longer - beans will still be better at 2 weeks old than a supermarket bag of ready-ground is at first opening. There are very good reasons a 'proper' coffee shop will grind the beans immediately before making your coffee. If there was nothing to be lost by bulk grinding it & grabbing a spoonful at the time of order… that's ...


2

That's correct. The greater surface area of ground coffee allows more trapped carbon dioxide to be released, taking aroma compounds with it, as well as making way for oxygen in the surrounding air to oxidize the aroma compounds and coffee oils.


-1

If anybody does use vinegar solely as a preservative, the substantial matter ( pickle etc.) Must be used ( refrigerated or otherwise) 'online'.


-1

It is absolutely possible to do this however it is not simple. Your microorganism control toolkit consists of: water activity temperature ph salinity oxygen levels enzymatic activity from beneficial microorganisms preservatives (not recommended by me) The more types of control you use the less of any type is required, but there is no magic formula. You ...


3

There's a specific term for reusing ingredients for stock twice: remouillage (which literally means a "rewetting"). Usually this "second stock" is not used directly for broth, as it has significantly less flavor than the primary stock. That said, depending on the type of bones, the amount of meat used in making the stock, etc., it may still have a very ...


1

I just pressure cooked a turkey, with roasting in the boiler just prior to the initial pressure cooking session, then afterwards, pressure cooking the carcass (bones and remaining skin and unused meat) two more times. After the second pressure cooking session of the turkey carcass and remains, the turkey bones were easily broken apart, either broken in the ...


3

There is no way at all to do that. If you made up your own recipe, pressure canning is out of the question. It is only safe for recipes which have been developed and tested with pressure canning in mind. Water bath canning is generally also only advised with recipes which have been developed and tested for canning, in order to ensure that you have both ...


1

You would need to pasteurize it or can it to sell it safely and not have issues with bacteria or botulism ..


3

You can freeze tallow. Dehydration and the freeze-thaw cycle of home freezers are the enemies of long term storage. You can't stop the freeze-thaw cycle, but if you minimize exposure to dehydration (freezer burn) by storing full containers, or even vacuum packing, you can keep them that way for quite a while. You added a picture, which is helpful. I ...


2

In the US, most canning recipes produced by authoritative sources use bottled lemon juice not fresh. Bottled lemon and lime juices are produced with a standardized acid level. pH in fresh lemons and limes can vary considerably , depending on freshness, storage method, variety and growing conditions. That being said, the pH of fresh limes on average is ...


2

Yes, for the most part, limes and lemons can be used interchangeably in recipes. However, it's important to note that lime juice is more acidic than lemon juice, so you may need to use a little less of it than what your recipe calls for. The general rule is 3/4 cup of lime juice substitutes for 1 cup of lemon juice.


-2

Aging is a process that happens when the water naturally and slowly evaporates from the cheese. I don't think this would happen in a can. The same reason that you can't age whiskey after is bottled.


2

Cheese aging or cheese ripening is influenced by a variety of factors, ranging from the microflora to the curd, and others. The enzymatic process is the most crucial process for all cheeses, although bacteria plays a role in many varieties. You can see the same process with certain cheeses (parmesan, amsterdam): store them properly in the fridge and they ...


2

Most commercial pint- and quart-size mayonnaise or salad dressing jars may be used with new two-piece lids for canning acid foods. However, you should expect more seal failures and jar breakage. These jars have a narrower sealing surface and are tempered less than Mason jars, and may be weakened by repeated contact with metal spoons or knives used in ...


-2

Yes you can use these. My mum has been using all types of glass jars for her jams and she always seals them with water boiling. :)


-3

I believe further research would change your answer. The jar the questioner pictured is certainly safe and is proven so by the fact it has already withstood the far more rigorous commercial pressure canning process. The lids on those jars are reusable many times. But I prefer home canning with new lug lids I purchase from a wholesale company ( I use ...


-2

You can use random jars, but it is not advised simply because you may waste food on failures of the seal and risk illness from contamination. It is not worth the risk of injury versus the cost of the better equipment. Canning jars come in standard sizes of mouths and lids and have wider lips for better seal. Additionally, the glass is tempered to resist ...


12

The important part of the system are the lids. The ideal lids are the Mason-type (no matter which company produced them), with a flat top and a separate side piece with thread. Another type that works is the older Weck style jar, which consists of a glass jar with glass lid, plus rubber steal and metal clamps, no threads. This system is as safe as the ...


4

For home pressure canning, you should always use a Mason jar (Ball is one brand, but there are others). A "Mason jar" is the kind with the two-piece lid. When using home equipment, the two-piece lid is important because it will seal properly inside the pressure vessel. If you use a jar with a one-piece lid, such as in your photo, the lid tightness needs to ...


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