8

While two of the three items you mention are similar (though not identical) - the food processor and blender - the third is completely different - the stand mixer. There's actually a pretty awesome, in-depth guide to these and more kitchen tools on BuzzFeed. I'm going to reference this some and use images from it. Stand Mixers A stand mixer is not a ...


4

There usually is no good way to do this, since most home appliances in an average kitchen are simply not suited for making nut butters. If you really want to do it, the preferable tool would be a masticating juicer. It is an expensive thing which also uses up quite a lot of counter space, and the process is messy. All other electric tools you can misuse -...


4

Your ideal multipurpose appliance is a set of four items: A paring knife A chef's knife A bread knife A food mill With skill and these four items, you can perform nearly any kitchen task, with greater precision and accuracy than the expensive electrics. They also take very little space. It takes practice, and is more work, but I went years before I had a ...


3

A food processor works well. Just fill the bowl lightly so that you can watch what happens as you do quick pulses. Use the metal blade. Slow short pulses. It also helps if the meat is really cold but not frozen. Yum.


2

While "500 watt mixer" doesn't really tell us any specifics about your setup, considering that right now you've got yourself a nice batch of crushed, or maybe stirred peanuts rather than peanut butter, I'm going to say "no." To make peanut butter, you either need a grinder in which the grinding surfaces are close enough to make butter, or you need something ...


2

Yes, most food processors will be able to liquefy peeled fruits. That said, a juicer is the superior tool for turning fruits into juice. The key difference between these devices is that a juicer will separate out the extraneous, non-liquid components of the fruit whereas a food processor will smash them all into one mixture. The resulting puree from the ...


2

There are a few recipes for nut butters on the Internet, which use a food processor. They recommend using raw, unsalted nuts, without skins. Begin by lightly roasting the nuts, then, placing them in the food processor while still warm. In bursts, begin to grind the nuts. While you stated that you didn't want to add anything, it might actually be ...


1

First things first, as it was very well pointed in the comments - food processor is not a 100% substitution for knives. It helps to do bulk processing of the more laborous knifework (slicing, brunoise, etc.) and also to do things that you cannot do with other tools (pureeing raw stuff) How long do the blades last, if they food-process raw hard unpiercable ...


1

When I read Bolognese, I was thinking of the slow cooked meat sauce. Is this the case? You have probably eaten and digested it by now. If not, I'm thinking what your recipe meant by 'mincing' the cooked meat, is considered breaking up the ground meat as it cooks. You want to keep all those flavors in the pan. I sometimes use a pastry cutter but I wouldn't ...


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