23

All tinned foods which are not dry (like flour or coffee grounds) have been sufficiently cooked and are safe to eat directly after opening. Once opened, leftover contents should be treated like any perishable food. Of course, some canned foods should be heated before serving, but that's a culinary consideration rather than a safety concern.


19

As people have mentioned, canned meats are cooked as part of the canning process, so it’s safe to eat as is... but it’s not always ideal to do so. In many ways, it’s like a chicken hot dog right out of the package. It might be safe to eat, but it’s much better if you cook it. I would recommend slicing it up, and then browning the slices. This helps to ...


18

Kenji Lopez-Alt did a very in-depth article for Serious Eats about the coronavirus and food that is worth reading. There is no evidence of the coronavirus (or covid) being passed through food, because in general the virus would break down too quickly to be passed on. Viruses survive better on non-porous surfaces. The full article is here: https://www....


13

From Grab Grocery: Precooked beef luncheon meat with the addition of chicken essence in 340g preserved cans. Robert beef luncheon meat is a wholesome meal cooked and slaughtered as per halal dietary laws and is suitable perfectly for people who are tolerant of meat products. So the meat is safe to eat without needing to be cooked by the customer. The link ...


6

I've found a couple of sources differentiating red palm from palm kernel oil & quoting smoke points from 150℃/300℉ to 235℃/450℉ depending on how refined it is. One can only imagine if you got a 'straight from the farm' type then it will be unrefined. I'd use it only for low-temperature cooking, don't let it smoke too much. Refs: https://www....


3

One time I was making a focaccia and instead of spraying a water mist in the oven I accidentally sprayed kitchen cleaner in the very hot oven! This did not go well. I got a face full of super-heated kitchen cleaner and the bread smelled and tasted of chemicals so I had to throw it away. I doubt very much that this is the case with your friend's bread though. ...


3

Simple washing (for carrots, or veg. you might peel) is fine, if you don't want to peel. There is no problem using root vegetables without peeling either. Stocks are typically brought to a simmer. So, you easily mitigate any bacterial concerns. Botulism toxins form in an anaerobic environment. So, you don't really have to worry about using fresh, even ...


3

Firat, first, first : look at your local rules and regulation regarding selling food product in your area. First first : Decide how long you want to have your product to last, this will put restriction on packaging. First, you need to do a lot of testing with different kind of packaging and see how your product behave over days, weeks and months (whatever ...


2

The safety of what you call "leftovers" is exactly the same as the safety of the vegetables they came from (assuming you store them under equal conditions after the vegetable is cut up into leftovers and main part). If you can eat the one, you can eat the other. The whole idea that the leftovers are inedible is also strictly untrue. I had to smirk ...


2

In my experience (in the UK) anything described as "luncheon" has been precooked and design to just slice and eat, perhaps in a sandwich


2

While I agree with the other answer that it's flavoured with something you don't expect, the other possibility is that the bread was wrapped in a freshly laundered, strongly scented cloth. You may be particularly sensitive given that they prefer unscented products. That would affect the crust much more than the inside.


2

Part of the challenge here might be your definition of "hot." When I think of "left overs", I see what is left over after eating a meal. It is certainly not "piping hot", as in just off the stove. There is no problem packaging, covering, and refrigerating these items. As an alternate example, when I make a batch of chicken ...


2

Versus literally means "green juice" in French (I know there's a "te" in French, but it's not pronounced). From Wikipedia: Verjus is a highly acidic juice made by pressing unripe grapes, crab-apples or other sour fruit. So versus is sour juice, nothing more, and we should treat it like so in our research for food safety. From StillTasty:...


1

From healthline.com: In one study, sprouting wheat increased the absorption of iron by over 200% ( 16 ). Sprouted grains are higher in several nutrients, including protein, fiber, vitamin C, folate and beta-carotene. In addition, sprouting decreases antinutrients, making the nutrients in the grains more readily available to your body. From Cultures For ...


1

Others have explained that it is safe to eat as-is from food safety standpoint. From a taste standpoint cooking may be a way to add flavor. Although recipes requests are off-topic, you might look online at recipes for a product called SPAM. They even have their own website. Notes: I have never eaten Spam or tried any of the recipes. It is definitely not ...


1

You should NOT put hot food in the fridge. It warm the whole fridge (affecting other foods) and increase need for energy to cool everything down. Puting a lid on container help it seal itself (hence the ventilation button in more costly containers to ease the opening) due to air contracting when cooling. Put a lid on container when putting hot food in. Wait ...


1

A plausible reason is the oven being cleaned with a product not intended for that purpose. I once had somebody help me clean and using an all-purpose cleaner on the oven, and after that, for about 10 baking sessions, i could smell the fragrance during baking. I suspect that the smell may have stuck to the food too, although i didn't notice it after spending ...


1

I just used one Anchor Hocking glass bowl covered with foil, for a shrimp recipe on top of the trivet, and it cracked in half. :-( Big disappointment.


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