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Each of the parts of your current recipe can be kept for months in a closed container, but once the container has been opened, you run a risk of spoilage. Mixing two or more ingredients increases the risk of something going wrong, as with the ingredients you mix air and possible contaminations into the sauce. You can mix a sauce like this for use that same ...


3

You're not doing anything wrong. If you kept the meat fresh, in your fridge, eventually it would undergo color changes, as well. Freezing meat and then thawing it is also a pretty major set of physical changes to it's initial state. I'd think minor changes to its appearance would be expected. Ask USDA: Why does the color of food change when frozen? ...


3

In 2011, the FDA has lowered the minimum recommended cooking temperature for pork. Previously, many folks considered the FDA safe temperature (previously 160°F) to be "overcooked." According to the FDA, the internal temperature at the center should be 145°F: Cook beef, pork, veal, and lamb roasts, steaks, and chops to at least 145° F (63° C), with ...


3

The linked website says the animals are trapped, dewormed, deloused and checked for other problems. As this is a USDA approved farm (according to their website), they will have to follow USDA rules around parasites etc. This also means that the USDA food safety rules apply. To quote the USDA: Cooking Whole Cuts of Pork: USDA has lowered the recommended safe ...


2

That could be what's known as a meat spot. When a hen is laying an egg, sometimes pieces are sloughed off on the process down the ovary. Although this is unusually large for a meat spot, it could be something like a blood clot that was sloughed off during the process. It is usually safe to eat, but I wouldn't recommend it.


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Confit is a preservation method that has been around longer than refrigeration. In fact, the French word it derives from means to preserve. The process is fairly straight-forward. First, salt/cure the product so that the surface is no longer hospitable to bacteria. Then, submerge in fat (for proteins) and cook (usually at a temp of 180 to 200F (82 to 94C). ...


1

Great question! Firstly, the build up of carbon dioxide should not jeopardize the ferment in any way. In fact, it probably serves to protect your ferment further from going bad or taking a turn in the wrong direction. Lactic acid bacteria grow under anaerobic conditions (absence of oxygen) during lacto-fermentation. These are the microbes that you really ...


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