30

In most developed countries trichinosis is extreme rare, this is due to changes in the way pigs are raised. In the US there were only 16 cases reported between 2011-2015, for example, and in Europe the rates are similar. This means that you could serve pork completely raw with extremely low risk from a trichinosis point of view. In a 50/50 beef-pork burger ...


11

Moka pots are traditionally rinsed (at most) but they're also traditionally used frequently. They develop a coating over time. If I'm putting mine away fro a long period I do clean it, after which it looks like yours, but mine is around 60 years old If it was put away dry (not so much the top part as round the seals and up the pipe) and stored somewhere ...


9

Sure you can! I think you're conflating two aspects of cooking meat here: Doneness: whether your meat turns out rare or well-done depends on the maximum temperature the meat is cooked at. Food safety: this is a function of both cooking time and temperature. To combine the two, you can have a food safe burger cooked rare if it's cooked at a low enough ...


7

Mold is a fungus and like other fungi it consists of a nearly invisible mycelium and a visible part producing the spores, the mushroom or in the case of mold the hairy stuff called the sporangium. As the rim part of the jar is under the lid I would consider it being inside the container and so there is a chance the mold already has spread into the sauce even ...


7

The growth of yeast is already slowed down by the approximately 2-3 bakers percent salt content in a dough, which makes round about 1-1.5% in total. So I doubt yeast will grow on a brine with 10% salt content. Also I’m very sure the stuff on the rim of your jar definitively is mold and mold that is growing unintentional should never be considered safe to eat....


6

It's probably not a good idea. If you know your whetstone is natural (Wikipedia) then it should be all right with a food-safe material in between (like baking parchment). Water-stones may well crack unless very well dried, so put the stone in a cold oven and turn on to about 80°C for a couple of hours, then allow to cool before using as a weight. Most ...


3

While the term has gained popularity, "dry brining" isn't really a thing. This is going to ruffle some feathers (pun intended), but brining happens in a wet environment. It's definition is a "cure dissolved in water." When there is not water, it is "salting." So, what you have is a salted turkey. (I know...semantics. Sorry, ...


3

Rinsing is not necessary. In fact, from a safety perspective, it is more risky to rinse poultry, because you present the opportunity to splatter and cross contaminate other items in your kitchen. So, best not to rinse. Just pat dry and proceed.


3

Picture open source from Steven Stolper. Nature Outside. So as you see above. The spring time is the best time collect Douglas Fir needles. The light green new ones make the best forage food. Can be boiled in a tea or added as any spice atop fish, foul or steak. There are other varieties of needles to seek out. It really depends on your area and the season. ...


3

If the canner pressure dropped suddenly from high pressure (either because a valve or gasket failed catastrophically, or because you quick-released the pressure), I might worry about the contents having boiled up, compromising the seals. But if the canner just failed to pressurize on the first try because of a leaking gasket, I don't see any reason for ...


2

I wouldn't say it's a 'daft question'. Some markets do sell pre-mixed ground pork-and-beef mixtures intended primarily for meatballs or meatloaf, so it's reasonable to wonder if that mix can be used for burgers, too, but there are too many variables not accounted for. The problem is that we have no way of knowing what standards the hypothetical market in the ...


1

I think the consensus is that rinsing poultry increase the chance of contamination by water droplets.


1

Yes, it can be done safely if you cook it fully (do not only partially cook it), chill it down quickly and keep it cold in transit. You want to minimize the time that it's in the 'food danger zone' (40°F to 140°F), so even if you're planning on getting it to fridge temperatures, you should still place it directly in the freezer to chill it down for an hour ...


1

First off: wash by hand, not a dishwasher (kicking in an open door). Heat and moisture make wood warp, so the less exposure to either/both the better. You should not sand it unless it gets rough (raised grain) chips or any other damage. The easiest and best way to make sure it is and remains food safe is to apply a food safe oil. Do not use olive oil as it ...


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