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Speaking as a potter: No. Yes. Stovetop glass and ceramic stovetop cookware are sold and used all over the world, and come in a variety of different types, including earthenware, flameware, stoneware, borosilicate glass, and high-temperature ceramic materials like vitrelle. They have several advantages over metal cookware, primarily for slow, even cooking,...


5

I strongly suspect that you are looking at a capsicum seed. In other words, you either had a piece of jalapeño, pickled pepperoni, or a sprinkle of pul biber (crushed red pepper). They are flat, about 2mm wide with that little tip. The “worm” is actually the embryonic part of the seed. There are a few edible seeds which seem to have a “worm”, e.g. this Q/A ...


5

Yes, it is safe. Just wash the bottle with dish soap and hot water. Unless you do not use the oil in the new bottle frequently, degradation from light should not be an issue; you could store that bottle in a cupboard when not in use (or get a dark glass booze bottle) Personally, I would try to use a small bottle than a 750ml bottle.


4

The reason not to use scratched glass bakeware is because the internal stresses encountered during heating can (rarely) cause the bakeware to violently fracture along the scratches. That doesn't really apply to glass tableware, which doesn't encounter the same temperatures (though cracked tableware, of multiple materials, will occasionally break from thermal ...


4

Just wanted to state in addendum to all the comments and answers already given, magnesium chloride, calcium chloride, and calcium sulfate are all classified as GRAS per the FDA.


3

Check this essay: Time-dependent depletion of nitrite in pork/beef and chicken meat products and its effect on nitrite intake estimation Check the Figure.1, while preserving meat in long days, the nitrite content in chicken sausage is much higher than pork/beef sausage. For food safety, Nitrosamine where is transformed from nitrite is an important cancer ...


3

Pyrex is the one people associate with oven-ware & is great in high heat, so long as the temperature change is slow & even... But if you put it on a burner ring it will go off like a bomb! [Believe me, I've seen it done a couple of times by accident.] Visions, on the other hand, has such a low coefficient of expansion they even make frying pans out ...


2

What is "spoiled milk"? "spoiled" milk is not a thing, that needs to be avoided, in most cases. As long as it doesn't have any mold growing or something, it most likely just started fermenting in the warm temperatures outside the fridge. However, it is perfectly possible that your milk didn't even start to ferment after 12 hours, depending on the room ...


2

Food-borne botulism is a risk mainly in homemade products which were not adequately sterilized before extended storage. The reason is that there must be live botulism spores in the product in the first place, which is not the case with store-bought products as long as these are undamaged and were prepared in accordance with hygiene regulations. For example, ...


1

You could keep it frozen for longer than a week, but by the time you reheated it, it would be like rubber. I wouldn't attempt more than a couple or three days in the fridge. The only way I can think to keep anything omelette-like would be like a Spanish tortilla - maybe it's the potato & onion that changes the texture, but that is fine after being ...


1

Make cheese! You'll be heating the milk, which should kill any harmful bacteria, but essentially you need soured milk to make cheese anyway. There are countless recipes online, but ricotta is the easiest (in my opinion) cheese to make at home. Source: Food52


1

It's highly unlikely to be suitable. Nearly all glass, and most ceramic, cookware isn't meant for for use over a flame at all (except possibly for keeping cooked food hot). But there is ceramic designed for use over a flame (Arcoflam is one brand). This should be heated gently to avoid the stresses caused by an uneven temperature, but can take very high heat....


1

No this egg doesn't look undercooked. It may even bored on over cooked. Your MIL should be fine consuming it. As for the granular bits you described that could be a number of things (burnt bits of egg, coarse salt, etc.) it's hard to say. Either way, nothing should be awry and she should be fine. If you want to give her better looking eggs, try sous vide ...


1

Per https://s3.amazonaws.com/kkd-e1-images.kktestkitchen.com/ecomm/nutrition/11329-nutrition.pdf, everything in the 'creme' (ugh I hate that word; it is a cream, crème is French) in a Krispy Kreme doughnut is shelf-stable. You're fine. Also, you don't in general want to refrigerate bready/cakey/pastry-y products, unless you will be warming them before ...


1

The comment of local food safety is spot on, they are the authority on legality for you and that is one of the criteria you must meet for your own protection and that of your clients/guests. As you ask specifically about health department requirements, they are the authority, so go straight to the source to satisfy them and that is more of a legal question, ...


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