182

The simplest trick is to place all the contaminated rice in the detergent box in the nearest trash bin, then obtain new rice. When it comes to cheap food staples like rice it's not worth the risk of eating tainted product, specially with substances that can wreak havoc on your digestive system like detergents.


113

Yes, it's true that bananas are radioactive, however, the amount of radiation that you get from eating a banana is negligible. It's also true that eating too many bananas can kill you, but if you manage to eat enough bananas to get radiation poisoning, you're going to die from something else long before potassium exposure comes into the equation - like, say, ...


46

Normal vinegar concentration (usually around 5% acetic acid) is too acidic to grow mold in the vinegar itself. Mold can sometimes grow on the bottle or on the surface of the vinegar. It isn't dangerous and can be wiped/skimmed off. What you are seeing is called the mother. Vinegar is produce when acetobacter bacteria consume alcohol and produce acetic acid....


46

In addition to the answers explaining that bananas do contain radioactive potassium, but in small amounts, it's also worth noting that your body maintains a fixed amount of potassium through metabolism. So even if you somehow manage to consume 5 million bananas, your body won't actually be exposed to 5 million Banana equivalent doses of radiation.


46

Do nothing, or maybe give them a soap wash. You seem to be very worried about what are very small effects. Sure, the oil can oxidize over time. It won't turn your utensils into a big ball of funk. You probably won't notice that much difference in reality. Maybe, if you hold them under your nose, the whiff will be different than if you hadn't used olive oil....


43

Don't eat the smelly rice because it is probably irremediably mixed with chemicals that may be harmful. But you may use that non-edible rice for other purpose detailed below. The rice smells like detergent because it absorbs very well what you mix with or around it. If you have a new/old or hard to clean container/board that smells weird, you can put that ...


43

Unless if it's labelled "sushi-grade" or "sashimi-grade", they probably don't freeze it deeply enough, so I wouldn't recommend it as-is. This is because of Salmon's high risk of parasites. However, you can turn it into sushi-grade fish if you have a freezer that reaches -20°C, and don't mind waiting. Here in British Columbia, the government has Sushi Safety ...


33

They are covered by mold, a type of fungus. What has happened is, mold loves moisture and when you closed the lid on almonds which had a good amount of moisture in them, the mold had the right conditions to grow. Note: You should discard them all. And next time, you'd like to have soaked almonds, it's better to keep them in the fridge at all times, as @...


29

You don't realize it, but you've asked a hot-button question. Expect to get lots of comments about botulism, etc. This is a result of a report a few years back about folks getting botulism from homemade garlic oil. I'll keep my answer practical. First, depending on where you live, your state, city, county, or other regional government may already have ...


27

Throw it away, it's not worth risking health issues over such a cheap staple. While the flour was originally dry, the pork juice introduced moisture into it, providing a much better breeding ground for bacteria. Your concern should not be (just) the bacteria, but also the much hardier toxins that they produce--those could easily give you food poisoning, and ...


22

While it's true that bananas are unusually radioactive (which actually means very slightly), you should keep in mind that all plants and animals are radioactive. For people, about half of our intrinsic radioactivity comes from the potassium in our bodies, and about half from the carbon-14 which we all carry around. As for safe quantities, that's pretty ...


21

Any package date would be a "best by" date, which would indicate quality, rather than safety. Really, the only risk is that the flavor has degraded. If the sugar is hard, you can put it in a microwave-safe bowl with a damp paper towel. Cover the bowl and microwave in short bursts (10 - 15 seconds), breaking up the hard lumps with a fork in between bursts. ...


21

This is an interesting question. Personally I would throw it out, the discoloration and resulting taste are the result of a chemical reaction with the pan. The brownish discoloration is a sign that the Aluminium (Al, the chemical symbol for the element from here on), is being attacked by a chemical reaction. This is most likely by an acid, though salts can ...


18

Aluminum cookware is "reactive", as opposed to "non-reactive" cookware like glass or stainless steel. When cooking acidic ingredients, a reaction occurs that can discolor food and sometimes leave a taste of tin. It would appear that the rum cake in question was acidic enough to cause this reaction. While I have yet to come across anything that says this is ...


17

The assumption that it was sterile is wrong. Standard cooking leads to a reduction of bacteria to about log6, so 1 in 100 000 survives. Afterwards, these bacteria multiply exponentially in your soup, potentially achieving levels at which people can get sick. Your logic will apply to canning. But it is known that the "fill the cooked food into an airtight ...


16

If you can't find details then it's pretty likely it is not sushi safe, and I would certainly make that assumption. Sushi safe freezing would add extra costs and Ikea is all about low costs. Plus, it wouldn't be necessary if the fish is going to be cooked or cured, and that's how most want to use it. If it was sushi safe I'd expect to see it clearly marked ...


15

Being packed together is typically safe to use, just inconvenient. Brown Sugar doesn't really "expire." However, it can absorb excess water if stored in a humid environment and lead to bacteria fermenting it (It would have an alcohol style smell and turn goopy) or pick up odors from its packaging or things that are nearby. For example, if it's stored in a ...


15

It smells like detergent because it has absorbed chemicals not designed to be eaten. Trust your nose, which is warning you! and move on. Why risk yours or somebody else's health for such little gain (the saving of 2$) is your health worth so little - or the health of others?


15

Safely? Yes. Cold water thaws are fine. It's hot or warm water thawing that's bad. Cold running water will thaw faster than cold still water, but cold still water is okay as you basically have a giant ice cube in the water (the thing you're thawing), so the water stays at a safe temperature until you're towards the end of the thaw ... it just takes a ...


12

Yes, bananas are radioactive. They contain potassium, and a small part of this comes as a radioactive isotope 40K. The dose of an average banana is (rounded up) around 0.1 μSv. Other potassium-rich foods also naturally contain 40K, e.g. potatoes. There is absolutely nothing to worry about. Our natural environment and cosmic radiation means our bodies are ...


11

High sugar (and salt) concentration causes osmosis from bacteria so they loose their water and die - this is why sugar and salt are great preservatives (eg. jams, salted meat, etc.). And this effect makes sugar (until it doesn't get wet) can not deteriorate. I'm sure you can use that old brown sugar safely. In my country (and I think in the whole EU) sugars ...


11

In addition to actually adding unwanted species, you're also adding moisture to a food that's otherwise very low in water. This will change its ability to support the growth of mould and bacteria in the damp bits. If you polish off a jar in a few days and always eat the bit you previously got saliva on, I'm sure the risks will be vanishingly small. If you ...


11

As a chemist this makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up. One cardinal rule in a chemistry lab is not to eat or drink in the lab. So you are not going to instantly die, nor will you grow another ear, from have cleaning supplies near food items, but to me it is a really bad idea. The cleaning supplies should be stored in a separate location. Under the ...


11

The US FDA has a handy Refrigerator and Freezer Storage Chart that might help you. In general your "leftovers" have a 3 to 4 day shelf life...I would think that includes your thawed strawberries.


11

Getting meatballs done is a matter of raising them to the correct internal temperature. 30 minutes seems like a long time even for large meatballs, but it depends on many factors. The best way is to pull the biggest one out and test it, first see if it's firm or squishy - firm means it's getting close to done. If it's firm stick an instant read thermometer ...


10

I will disagree with the other answer for one simple reason -- the fewer steps taken en masse, the lower the risk. Now of course, this assumes that you're correctly cleaning your grinder, but because you're only grinding one chunk, or maybe a few chunks of meat, you only have to worry if those chunks of meat had contamination. For a larger operation, every ...


10

Really no need. These are salad servers. Salad has dressing. Dressing contains olive oil. Relax!


10

Making tofu for mass production and consumption and making tofu at home generally follow the same procedures. Soybeans are soaked, ground, and cooked. The resulting "milk" is separated from the soilds. Then a coagulant is added (either salts, acids, or enzymes depending on producer and type of tofu). Finally, the tofu is pressed. The one difference ...


9

Rancid oil is generally still safe, it just has a bad taste, so from a safety standpoint your utensils are fine as-is. From a taste consideration, the oil must 1) go rancid, and then 2) have flavor molecules transferred from the utensils to your food...in large enough quantity to actually change the taste. Since usually only the outside surface of your ...


9

Very simply; freezing breaks the cell walls. As ice takes up more space than water, as the vegetables freeze all the cells rupture. Once defrosted, each cell is then little more than a slowly-leaking bag of nutrient, exposed to the open air. Whether or not any bacteria gets in & starts to breed is almost irrelevant by this time, as your 'leaky bag' is ...


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