75

There are two differences between your buns and a tin can. First, your buns were heated to a core temperature of under 100°C. Yes, your oven was probably set way higher, but the water content in your filling prevents it from getting hotter than boiling water. Commercial canning is done in the vicinity of 120-130°C, which is possible because the cans are ...


56

I was surprised at how difficult it was to find the answer, but I eventually found articles by the FDA and CDC. Consumers should be aware that there are additional risks associated with the consumption of raw dough, such as particularly harmful strains of E. coli in a product like flour. Flour is derived from a grain that comes directly from the field and ...


53

One possible consideration is that some frozen desserts (most notably ice creams and sorbets) can be very difficult to scoop if your freezer is too cold. Optimal serving temperature for ice cream is between about 5 & 10°F (-15°C & -12°C); colder freezers may result in difficult scooping and/or needing to leave the ice cream out to thaw. The ...


49

Yes - the mold is an indication that the spores have entered that tomato, but do not indicate any problems with others. Mold usually enters fruits like tomato through the stem site or damage to the skin. The bits you see outside the fruit are actually the fruiting bodies of the fungus (equivalent of the bit you eat on a mushroom - the rest is below the soil)....


31

That water may contain all sorts of fungicides, dust, contaminants, rodent feces, insects, and so on. The process of production of beans is far from sterile. If you wash the beans thoroughly before soaking, you may avoid it, but a common kitchen practice is to just dump dry beans into water, maybe rinse once to get rid of the worst of the possible ...


30

In most developed countries trichinosis is extreme rare, this is due to changes in the way pigs are raised. In the US there were only 16 cases reported between 2011-2015, for example, and in Europe the rates are similar. This means that you could serve pork completely raw with extremely low risk from a trichinosis point of view. In a 50/50 beef-pork burger ...


28

As Joe mentioned, there was something acting as a litmus paper! Turmeric placed in an alkaline solution will turn bright red! quoted from: https://foodcrumbles.com/how-turmeric-gets-its-color/ Most probably there wasn't enough yogurt or it didn't react with baking soda and left the dough alkaline.


27

There is no rule that plant based food is safe to be eaten raw. Also, on a side note, the salmonella reasoning was somewhat misguided - not that it isn't a risk, but it isn't the reason why cookie dough is not intended for raw consumption. When determining food safety, one doesn't ask "where will the bacteria come from", except in some very special ...


25

For the already-stuck fish: no, there is no way. Don't try to chisel them out, I've known somebody who damaged their freezer that way. For any fish you will be placing there in the future: find a packaging material which will not stick to the freezer. Plastic bags are the most common way of doing it. You also have to ensure that your freezer's bottom is dry. ...


24

I don't know about chicken specifically, but pork filled baozi (steamed buns) need to be stored in the refrigerator. Bread crust isn't exactly non-porous after all (squeeze a bun, the air doesn't bulge out of another part of the bun, it escapes and then flows back in when you release it). I wouldn't risk it.


24

Sage (Salvia officialis) is a staple herb in various cuisines. It pairs with veal in an Italian Saltimbocca or pork in the British sage and onions stuffing and is eaten even on its own, e.g. battered and fried. So yes, it’s clearly edible. However, personally I would not serve it as a salad leaf, it’s probably too pungent to be truly enjoyable, but taste is ...


24

Your supposed advantages are not correct. I believe if eggs are mixed too much, whites can get a rubber-like texture. No, this is not correct. Are you thinking of gluten? That is the ingredient that gets tough with overmixing. So by that logic, you should be adding the flour last - but the whole point of recipes which are being held for a long time is to ...


23

All tinned foods which are not dry (like flour or coffee grounds) have been sufficiently cooked and are safe to eat directly after opening. Once opened, leftover contents should be treated like any perishable food. Of course, some canned foods should be heated before serving, but that's a culinary consideration rather than a safety concern.


22

Small air bubbles are normal and make no difference to kimchi fermentation, nor do larger bubbles that form during fermentation. As long as the kimchi remains more or less submerged in the liquid, there’s no need to remove the trapped gas. Kimchi is an extremely difficult thing to mess up - once established, the lactic acid bacterial culture will murder any ...


21

I once worked in grocery produce. The skin offers a remarkably effective protective layer. I have opened crates of tomatoes where one has completely turned to mush, while every other tomato in the crate is pristine. Same for apples and pears and every other kind of fruit, really. Wash well and the rest are fine. This is standard practice commercially. As ...


19

As people have mentioned, canned meats are cooked as part of the canning process, so it’s safe to eat as is... but it’s not always ideal to do so. In many ways, it’s like a chicken hot dog right out of the package. It might be safe to eat, but it’s much better if you cook it. I would recommend slicing it up, and then browning the slices. This helps to ...


19

I see you're familiar with the "danger zone" concept. I think the only on-topic way to answer this is to help you add up the "danger zone" time, (and raise the concern of cross contamination!). I will say in response to your heading, there is no "loophole" in food safety guidelines. They are pretty stark in that things are ...


19

The biggest issue with what's essentially a foraged food is identification. Luckily for roses that's quite easy. You do need a lot of petals, and well-scented ones; many pretty varieties are bland, but wild species can be very good. Scent is crucial, colour is optional, but (pale) pink rosewater is traditional and is what you'll get if use use a mix of ...


19

I'm no chemist, but a quick googling shows hydrogen peroxide [sodium percarbonate in water] to be quite aggressive on aluminium. I'd guess that some light surface scratching, which would otherwise have been quite survivable* in itself, allowed the peroxide to leech under the non-stick surface, attack the aluminium substrate & allow larger flakes to break ...


18

Kenji Lopez-Alt did a very in-depth article for Serious Eats about the coronavirus and food that is worth reading. There is no evidence of the coronavirus (or covid) being passed through food, because in general the virus would break down too quickly to be passed on. Viruses survive better on non-porous surfaces. The full article is here: https://www....


17

The rule of thumb when spiking a ganache is to either reduce the cream by the same amount or add double the amount of chocolate (by weight). So for one ounce of alcohol you either leave out one ounce of cream or add another two ounces of chocolate. That said, yours is a slightly lighter ganache than the usual 1 part cream / 2 parts chocolate and a slight ...


16

While pouring a caustic chemical on your non-stick and scraping it with hard plastic didn't so your coating any favors it was very likely already damaged. How this damage came to be is impossible to say exactly, but here's some ways it could have happened: Overheating: non-stick coatings have become more durable but they still aren't indestructible. Non-...


15

Rinsing or washing the container is no worse than rinsing or washing a plate on which you have let your meat rest. But do it when you take your meat out, not a couple of hours later, to avoid spoilage starting. If you send yours to landfill, cleaning it is for your comfort. Where and when I grew up we would never bother, but we did accept that bins smell of ...


14

If you were a human-sized rat, it seems that in the worst case, 2 kg of leaves might be enough. That's a rather handwavy amount, of course. To go into more depth: the presence of papers like "Toxicity of Salvia officinalis in a newborn and a child: an alarming report" means that dying from eating sage isn't common - apparently, two very young ...


14

The other reason to discard the soaking water is (theoretically) limiting flatulence. According to The Bean Institute and other sources: Soaking overnight and then discarding the soaking water leaches out sugars in beans that are responsible for gas production. Scientific evidence supporting this is weak and contradictory. However, it hasn't been ...


14

There is little reason, aside from the obvious ones you already mention, to avoid the coldest setting. You might be concerned with scoop-ability of some frozen desserts, but that probably will not be too much of an issue for store-bought products, which are often stabilized for texture. Also, these can be removed in advance to temper. The Institute for ...


13

All the ingredients used in curing are safe to eat, otherwise they would not be able to be used in a commercial sense. Typically cured meats of the sort that you describe are called something like "corned beef". These are produced using a curing salt that is composed of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite along with regular table salt (sodium ...


13

The water from cooking mushrooms is good for flavour. When making vegetarian pasta sauces, I often add mushrooms and their cooking water to the sauce, for example. These get well-fried, but not typically until the water evaporates, which of course concentrates the flavour - that's still good. The only time I waste it (and it does feel like a waste, perhaps I ...


13

I believe the instructions are about trying to remove any major air gaps, initially. As the process goes on, and your kimchee is fermenting, it will be impossible to remove bubbles, since the fermentation process that kimchi goes through produces carbon dioxide as a by-product. Remember, the original, traditional kimchee isn't made in a glass jar and ...


13

There’s no way to make a dead clam purge sand etc. You can always try to cook a few and see how gritty they really are, then decide. You may be lucky and find that they have a good mouthfeel, or you may find out that your entire catch inedible and needs to be discarded.


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