New answers tagged

1

This is actually the recommendation of a lot of mass produced items. They might have been contaminated after being made, and the producer wants to ensure that you kill anything that might have been introduced. A cynic would also point out that this shifts liability to the consumer, as if you get sick from it, they can insist that you didn’t follow their ...


0

Vacuum packed meat has been sealed, but it’s possible that bacteria was sealed in there with it. If it’s some sort of a cured meat (eg, a cured sausage, dried or salted meats), then it might be okay stored at room temperature, but I’d only consider factory sealed containers for that— not my sealing it at home, where I don’t have the same sanitation practices ...


4

Each of the parts of your current recipe can be kept for months in a closed container, but once the container has been opened, you run a risk of spoilage. Mixing two or more ingredients increases the risk of something going wrong, as with the ingredients you mix air and possible contaminations into the sauce. You can mix a sauce like this for use that same ...


3

You're not doing anything wrong. If you kept the meat fresh, in your fridge, eventually it would undergo color changes, as well. Freezing meat and then thawing it is also a pretty major set of physical changes to it's initial state. I'd think minor changes to its appearance would be expected. Ask USDA: Why does the color of food change when frozen? ...


3

In 2011, the FDA has lowered the minimum recommended cooking temperature for pork. Previously, many folks considered the FDA safe temperature (previously 160°F) to be "overcooked." According to the FDA, the internal temperature at the center should be 145°F: Cook beef, pork, veal, and lamb roasts, steaks, and chops to at least 145° F (63° C), with ...


3

The linked website says the animals are trapped, dewormed, deloused and checked for other problems. As this is a USDA approved farm (according to their website), they will have to follow USDA rules around parasites etc. This also means that the USDA food safety rules apply. To quote the USDA: Cooking Whole Cuts of Pork: USDA has lowered the recommended safe ...


2

That could be what's known as a meat spot. When a hen is laying an egg, sometimes pieces are sloughed off on the process down the ovary. Although this is unusually large for a meat spot, it could be something like a blood clot that was sloughed off during the process. It is usually safe to eat, but I wouldn't recommend it.


0

As long as you end your recipe with the correct consistency, no need to keep it in the refrigerator. Always good to keep at room temperature for 6 to 8 hours in order to get a perfect color gradient starting from light yellow to dark at the center. Original Mysore Pak is a little hard compare to Ghee Mysore Pak.


Top 50 recent answers are included