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2

There are several studies published on the presence of campylobacter (which is the bacteria of concern) in chicken. You didn't specify where you are, but the findings are fairly consistent worldwide. Chicken has a much higher incidence than other poultry products, and other proteins, though campylobacater can be present there too. Of course, this is all ...


-1

Fish is such food that causes food poisoning quickly. And if you see something there, like isopods, or the colour is not okay, or it smells strange, it's better to through it away. Even if you cook it it doesn't guarantee you safety.


4

Yes, mould (or mold) can be invisible. When an item is visibly moldy, the visible part of the mold is actually the fruiting body. (You can think of a "fruiting body" like the flower on a plant. It's the structure that produces and distributes spores, much like flowers produce seeds.) The main body of the mold is a fine network of root-like ...


3

Most crab legs are packed in ice after being caught. Most of the lice do not survive the freezing process. They definitely do not survive the cooking process and do not harm the meat. It is unclear if fresh, raw crab lice directly from the ocean cause issues. http://portal.ncdenr.org/web/mf/crab-leeches


1

A lot of spreadable products won't be if chilled, as the fats harden. Peanut butter is one (though how much it stiffens depends on the presence of other fats than the oil from the peanuts). Nutella stored in the fridge becomes hard enough to bend cutlery when you try to get it out. Olive oil goes cloudy and thickens but doesn't come to any harm, though it's ...


3

Besides the issues already mentioned, you should also beware of storing some dry goods in the fridge, especially if you live in a high-humidity area. Basically, every time you open the container outside of the fridge, you will exchange it for more humid air. In the fridge, the moisture will condense. If you're storing something in amounts similar to the ...


2

Many food items, particularly those containing oils, but many others too, will change characteristics when cold. The good news is that keeping honey and most other things at fridge temperature does not generally affect flavour, but it may affect texture permanently. Oils and other substances that can go rancid will generally keep better in the fridge than at ...


0

Unless your mouldy food was simply leftovers left too long, then you have a more serious issue of cross-contamination. Toast crumbs in the butter, marmite or honey will do that & so will many things far less visible. If you have either cause you will first need to fully clean the fridge, then start over with better working practices. As you've noticed, ...


1

I'd add that it depends a lot on the food. On one end you have food that's inherently on the safe side, like sour milk products: They can safely stay at room temperature for a day or longer — being kept warm is how they are actually produced. The more acidic, sweet or salty a dish is, the safer. On the unsafe end would be proteins like raw egg (in mayo) or ...


1

The answer is exactly what you speculated - the spit. Well, not the spit itself, but the microbial contaminants from your oral cavity that you are introducing to the food when you eat. Your mouth (and rest of you too) contains a whole bunch of microorganisms (around 700 species in the mouth). Each time you put an eating implement in your mouth and return it ...


3

I don't think that this plan is necessarily unsafe, in terms of likelihood of sickening or killing you, but it's definitely less safe than washing the container. It only requires a microscopic amount of pathogens to make you extremely sick; that there is no visible residue is not as strong an argument as you seem to think. Rinsing is better with soap, too. ...


0

I'd say no. Conventional wisdom suggest that when in doubt, throw it. Throw it away, go back to your fishmonger/store and tell them about that. If that fails, do not buy from that brand (if there's any brands attached to your frozen fish)


8

As you are asking about a single day, I'm pretty sure it's safe. Lets compare the concept with how we handle our typical leftovers; Say we made chilly, and stored it in a container in our fridge, so every time we decide make tacos, simply could scoop out some chilly. 2 days after we made the chilly, it came down to the last scoop. Would we hesitate to scrape ...


19

I see you're familiar with the "danger zone" concept. I think the only on-topic way to answer this is to help you add up the "danger zone" time, (and raise the concern of cross contamination!). I will say in response to your heading, there is no "loophole" in food safety guidelines. They are pretty stark in that things are ...


9

No, freezing in a normal home freezer does not kill bacteria. They typically just enter a dormant state and reactivate as soon as you thaw the milk. Freezing a safe food extends the storage life, but does not make an otherwise unsafe food safe.


13

All the ingredients used in curing are safe to eat, otherwise they would not be able to be used in a commercial sense. Typically cured meats of the sort that you describe are called something like "corned beef". These are produced using a curing salt that is composed of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite along with regular table salt (sodium ...


5

Yes, that’s perfectly safe. If your yogurt has live yogurt bacteria (so not pasteurized after fermentation), some of that bacteria would turn the fresh milk into yogurt if given enough time - but we are talking about hours in a rather warm environment, not in a smoothie that is mixed and then consumed rather quickly or stored in the fridge. The milk is just ...


0

I have a "reframing" approach that may work for people with large (but not full) freezers: I keep a plastic container in the freezer, and put any "likely to be smelly" trash --- things like shrimp-shells, meat-packaging, etc. --- into that container and close the top. This largely delays rotting, so it does not matter whether you wash the ...


0

Immediately throw it in your normal trash. Absolutely don't rinse it, that's a great way to spread contamination everywhere. Smell has never been a problem for me as I have a covered garbage can in the kitchen and regularly move the garbage to the trash collection point outside.


4

Disclaimer: The question got edited into something completely different. You know those large garbage bins used on garbage day? Though plenty of people use only garbage bags, at my household we have our regular sized garbage cans in our house, and those large garbage bins out beside our house. Every time we have a meat container (be it a Styrofoam plate, ...


15

Rinsing or washing the container is no worse than rinsing or washing a plate on which you have let your meat rest. But do it when you take your meat out, not a couple of hours later, to avoid spoilage starting. If you send yours to landfill, cleaning it is for your comfort. Where and when I grew up we would never bother, but we did accept that bins smell of ...


3

The soak doesn't swell them to 'cooked' level; the cooking does that. It is true that very old beans will never be tender, but you have no good way to find that out before you spend the next two hours simmering them. [Change the water first & don't salt them until the last half hour]. This covers most of the basics, over several methods - How to Cook ...


4

Stephie's answer is thorough. I just want to add a couple more points in favour of refrigerating: Firstly, the cooked meat inside is not the only thing that can spoil. Fluffy bread itself is prone to growing mold within a few days in a moist environment (especially if exposed to people's hands and breath), or drying out and being unpleasant to eat in a dry ...


24

Sage (Salvia officialis) is a staple herb in various cuisines. It pairs with veal in an Italian Saltimbocca or pork in the British sage and onions stuffing and is eaten even on its own, e.g. battered and fried. So yes, it’s clearly edible. However, personally I would not serve it as a salad leaf, it’s probably too pungent to be truly enjoyable, but taste is ...


14

If you were a human-sized rat, it seems that in the worst case, 2 kg of leaves might be enough. That's a rather handwavy amount, of course. To go into more depth: the presence of papers like "Toxicity of Salvia officinalis in a newborn and a child: an alarming report" means that dying from eating sage isn't common - apparently, two very young ...


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