New answers tagged

1

The concern here is that this is something unexpected and potentially harmful. The general rule is - if in doubt, throw it out! Many microorganisms will grow quite happily and form a whitish sediment below a liquid layer. The liquid you have is also turbid, which tells me that you most likely have some suspended microorganisms as well, but this could also ...


7

Making tofu for mass production and consumption and making tofu at home generally follow the same procedures. Soybeans are soaked, ground, and cooked. The resulting "milk" is separated from the soilds. Then a coagulant is added (either salts, acids, or enzymes depending on producer and type of tofu). Finally, the tofu is pressed. The one difference ...


6

It is common, when preparing pho, to add raw, thinly sliced beef to the piping hot broth. That way the broth essentially cooks the beef. So what you received is not surprising. It is impossible to know, from what you have written, if there are safety concerns. IF the beef was handled correctly at the restaurant, and IF you received and cooked the beef ...


6

It is unlikely but possible that it is unsafe to eat. This study of aluminum leaching from pans during cooking of acidic liquids (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1397396) showed a levels as high as about 50mg/kg. Let's assume your cake is about 1kg, so 50mg aluminum. The European Food Safety guideline for aluminum according to this paper (https://www....


21

This is an interesting question. Personally I would throw it out, the discoloration and resulting taste are the result of a chemical reaction with the pan. The brownish discoloration is a sign that the Aluminium (Al, the chemical symbol for the element from here on), is being attacked by a chemical reaction. This is most likely by an acid, though salts can ...


18

Aluminum cookware is "reactive", as opposed to "non-reactive" cookware like glass or stainless steel. When cooking acidic ingredients, a reaction occurs that can discolor food and sometimes leave a taste of tin. It would appear that the rum cake in question was acidic enough to cause this reaction. While I have yet to come across anything that says this is ...


3

If it was normal blue cheese, there's a pretty high chance the mold is Penicillium roqueforti, which is harmless. However, if the mold comes from something else, it can be basically whatever. In order to assess what kind of mold it is, you need to evaluate if it could have gone from the cheese to the sausage. What kind of sausage is it? Was it saucisson or ...


0

There's a commonly used mnemonic device in the Food Safety industry, known as FAT TOM (here's Wikipedia's breakdown): Food There are sufficient nutrients available that promote the growth of microorganisms. Protein-rich foods, such as meat, milk, eggs and fish are most susceptible. Acidity Foodborne pathogens require a slightly acidic pH level of 4.6-7....


0

From the regulatory standpoint, I don't see any such regulations in the inspection guidelines, not even the 42 hour UV treatment...that isn't to say they're wrong, but I can't in particular find where that figure came from. Here's some additional resources if you wish to look further into CFIA regulations on bivalve molluscan shellfish: Canadian Shellfish ...


4

Heat the grill, like good and hot (I have used the hottest setting). Once it is hot, just scrape it down with a brush or wooden scraper. After that, let it "cook" for a few minutes. Once all that is done, I would say you are good to go.


4

I originally voted this question as a duplicate. However, the OP is correct in that the proposed duplicate does not address the specific case of sous vide. Here, I attempt to help in that regard. The definitive source for the answer to your question is Douglas Baldwin. From the information you've supplied, it is difficult to make any safety claims. ...


0

For me, it depends which raw meat. I wouldn't keep pork or poultry for very long unwrapped but beef definitely needs an airing to develop it's taste. At least four days, if it's from a supermarket, no more than ten in my fridge. I know it's ready when the outside is very dark. Then I'll dampen it and sprinkle with sea salt and roast it at the top of a very ...


0

Corned beef actually requires keeping brisket in a water, salt and spice solution for at least a week. So it’s not just a way to preserve meat, but also a way to enhance it.


2

Normally it's recommended to keep cooked meat for less than a week in the fridge. But since this was vacuum sealed (less Fat Oxidation and Rancidity) and cooked again at 63c for over an hour (killing bacteria and molds, most of which are harmless but unpleasant, and would be noticable) I'd say it's safe to eat. It might have developed some off-flavors or ...


3

It definitely depends on the kind of schmaltz you are having, but to be honest I never have seen schmaltz gone bad, even after several years. I have had schmaltz in the fridge for over a year and it was still perfectly fine. I'd suggest the following: follow your gut. Just look at it and check for the usual signs. In order: Does it look normal (no mold, no ...


2

It's very different if food starts out hot, as in fresh out of the oven, or cold, as in came out of the fridge. There is much more differential between oven temperature and room temperature than between fridge and room temperatures. That means that hot chicken will cool considerably faster than cold chicken will warm up. The slope of the exponential rate ...


0

Generally - No, a cumulative 2 h at room temp is considered the limit for any food stuff before spoilage is likely to occur


2

I'm not certain about the older ones, but frozen schmaltz should be fine for a while, at least a few months.


1

In regards to the first of the two questions you asked, " [does] the quote beneath from Mussel Myths & FAQs - The Cornish Mussel Shack holds true for Canada too?" Do I need to soak my mussels in water and oatmeal? No. This used to be done to help purge the mussel of any grit. All commercially sold mussels legally have to be purged and purified in UV ...


3

What you are essentially describing is a brine. That is a saline water solution that trough the process of osmosis draws in moisture trough the cell walls and releases them. This has the effect of making the cell walls more absorbent of moisture which leads to juicier meat. The problem is for brining you typically want to leave the meat in the brine at room ...


4

I can only partially answer your question but still: Cold : yes, absolutely Salt : yes, that would help. Water ??? No. Bacterias love water. When trying to preserve meat you actually want to do the opposite, you want to keep it dry. That's how curing works actually. Absorbant paper is often used to prevent the meat from deteriorating by swimming in its ...


3

Probably not; I wouldn't chance it. So: NO. Something is producing gas, thus there is unexpected fermentation (by microbe action). It is more likely to be bad than good. Guacamole should not be fermenting.


4

The white specs are not colonies of bacteria, but in fact, crystallized oils. This phenomena is common in many tinned fish rich in fatty oils. This is normal and completely safe to eat. If it bothers you too much, you can try reheating it, which should dissolve the crystallized oils back into the sauce. Just remember not to microwave anything metal. This ...


1

I am afraid food safety does not work the way you imagine it, or the way that would be easy to deal with. I cannot write up a whole course on food safety here, but here are two facts pertinent to your question. Shelf stability is a truly binary outcome. Your food either supports bacterial life - which means it is only good for a total of 2 unrefrigerated ...


6

Dehydrating food is a common practice for trekking and backpacking. Dehydrating vastly reduces the water activity in foods, making them a less hospitable environment for bacterial activity. You'll want to use a reliable dehydrator with a variable temperature setting, as different ingredients require different temperatures and times to properly dehydrate. I ...


0

Perhaps the jury is still out on whether the black bits are harmful or not, but they will break off into whatever you cook now so.... The best way might be to start over again - to clean the pan Simmer one quart of water in the pan on your stove. When the water is simmering, add 1 tbsp cream of tartar, 1 tbsp lemon juice and 1 tbsp white vinegar. Simmer for ...


2

This can be one of two things: 1) If you bought this from a store the squash is a bit old. It own't hurt you as mentioned in one of the comments above it just isn't pretty. 2) If this is a fresh squash, if you had a heavy rain storm or a higher than normal concentration of smoke in the area (like forest fires) then it is possible for excess minerals to be ...


3

Joe's comment is correct. If you haven't canned them as long as the recommendation then you can't have confidence that they will be safe for a long period at room temperature. Your options are to try again or treat them as not shelf stable. The downside with trying to can them again is that the food is likely to be hopelessly overcooked. For something ...


4

NO! Using your method you have created the perfect environment to grow Clostridium botulinum, so within a couple of days you very well could have a thriving colony of botulism rich food. From USDA Complete Guide to Home Canning Ensuring safe canned foods Growth of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum in canned food may cause botulism—a deadly form ...


3

I suspected that @FuzzyChef's answer was essentially correct, but I felt that the question was not conclusively answered without sources, so I ended up never accepting an answer. Thankfully, Linda Harris published this very comprehensive summary (which I recommend you to read if you are a fan of garlic), from which these parts stand out: Garlic is a low-...


4

It's a fungal infection. If you google Aphanomyces raphani you will see much more serious examples but that how it looks usually when the outside is not affected (so also not thrown out by seller)


1

I'd be tempted to say, "I don't know." In very many cases, 'I don't know' often goes hand in hand with '& I don't much care either...' However, when it comes to fresh fruit & veg of dubious provenance that is going to be eaten raw, that rapidly turns into, "I don't know so I'm going to play safe & throw it away." The only mitigation - &...


0

I usually store suet in the freezer, where it keeps for many months. In the fridge, I wrap it carefully to reduce oxygen exposure (and hence, rancidity).


1

I think putting your starter (some yogurt you want to use as) in the freezer will also prolong and ensure how many generations of batches will be able to be made in the future. My mother in the US taught me how to make yogurt as a child. Then when I lived in India with my Uncle I learned how to make (heirloom) Starter; yogurt from scratch with no previously ...


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