New answers tagged

1

This is trickier than the case of "use by"=safety and "best before"=quality.* If there's an additional "use by" date, as there often is, that shouldn't be exceeded, but if you open the packet on the day of purchase there can be a big gap between the two. This warning is often combined with "packaged in a protective ...


1

I have eaten feta cheese for years after the expiration date. The feta is refrigerated tightly closed in the same container purchase and it’s crumbled feta. I have never seen signs of mold, as a matter of fact the older the feta the better it tastes. I purchased it from Sam’s wholesale and feta lasts for years. I haven’t had a problem but I don’t recommend ...


3

tl;dr; The resources for this topic are terrible. The best I have come up with is reasoning from first principles. That reasoning suggests the probable temperature at which spores are destroyed is somewhere between 113.3C and 116.4C, but without a proper microbiology experiment it's hard to say with much certainty whether that's correct. Problems with ...


1

In safety terms, yes. It's been in the 'danger zone' for a short enough time. For texture, I'd say 30 mins was already borderline over-cooked, so it's only going to toughen up still further.


1

"Is it ok to eat" is a personal question that can't be objectively answered. What we can say is that eating soft whites or yolks is not considered safe by the FDA or the CDC: Cook eggs until both the yolk and the white are firm. Scrambled eggs should not be runny. FDA - What You Need to Know About Egg Safety Cook eggs until both the yolk and ...


5

You can eat eggs raw, so long as you're not pregnant or in an at-risk health group. Fry them however you like them. UK chickens are vaccinated against salmonella. Elsewhere, less so. Apparently the US doesn't do it at all, hence their tougher handling regulations. https://www.foodsafetynews.com/2013/01/poultry-vaccinations-credited-for-uks-big-drop-in-...


3

I would think that if all the ingredients are pasteurized then you wouldn't need to re-pasteurize anything. Where I've heard of people getting into trouble is when they add something like raw fruit to an ice cream mix, and the fruit hasn't been pasteurized (cooked to a particular temperature for a particular amount of time). But note that just because it's ...


3

Your product is shelf-stable. The expiration is a "best-by" date, meaning the quality degrades, but it remains safe. Refrigeration has no relevancy, unless you opened the package.


1

As far as I can tell, the majority of bean leaves are edible raw or cooked. They don't become unsafe, but likely become more fibrous as they mature. In this case, cooking would make eating them more pleasurable. Here are some possible uses. Here is an edit based on the comment of @FuzzyChef, below. I had not considered the potential impact of ...


1

I've been in the same situation (and am again... I'm a terrible scoby parent). It's dormant and likely quite weak and/or imbalanced, but as long as it's not moldy or severely discolored, you should be able to bring it back. That said, you probably want to give it a boost. I usually buy a bottle of plain kombucha (GT's for me) and use that as starter tea ...


1

Personally, I wouldn't even consider it. If it melts both your meat & roasting tin are trash. I also wouldn't consider it to 'distribute heat more evenly', it will start as a cold spot, then eventually become a steamer. It would probably prevent browning on the underside. I'd consider it with the same scepticism I do most of the "clever hacks" ...


8

I can't imagine there's any benefit in using the tray liner as a cooking aid, anything about them distributing heat evenly is a load of garbage, that's what pans are for. Plus, cooking your food on a sponge of silica gel and plastic that's absorbed a bunch of blood is just plain gross. It's impossible to say whether the plastics have BPAs, different ...


17

The rule of thumb when spiking a ganache is to either reduce the cream by the same amount or add double the amount of chocolate (by weight). So for one ounce of alcohol you either leave out one ounce of cream or add another two ounces of chocolate. That said, yours is a slightly lighter ganache than the usual 1 part cream / 2 parts chocolate and a slight ...


13

You would need a tremendous amount of desiccant to make any significant temporary impact on ice build-up in a freezer. The only major drawback of ice build-up is that it takes up space in the freezer… and the desiccant would take up more space. BTW, the normal material used as a desiccant is silica gel, which is non-toxic.


13

There’s no way to make a dead clam purge sand etc. You can always try to cook a few and see how gritty they really are, then decide. You may be lucky and find that they have a good mouthfeel, or you may find out that your entire catch inedible and needs to be discarded.


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