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2

Don't eat it raw. However, while the quality has likely degraded, it can be cooked and eaten safely if it was handled properly before freezing, and has remained in the freezer since.


1

My mother and my wife have been making jams for a total of about 90 years. Based on what I have seen, I think all jams made with either hot bath or open kettle method oxidize a bit near the top of the jar. Lighter coloured jams, such as peach, show it more obviously. The taste is generally unaffected. We have always eaten these and never had any problems. I ...


0

I don't really reuse my tea bags because mainly they lose flavour quite drastically after the 2nd cup, but depending on your environment (humid/dry climate), tea bags steeped within a day and tossed out after works fine for me. Each time pouring boiling hot water. I normally reuse loose tea leaves instead, like puerh, oolong tea leaves (even when they come ...


-2

This is always going to be one of those, 'you'll never know until you try it' decisions. If the temperature where you live struggles to get into double figures, I wouldn't even think twice. If it's 32°C in the shade, you might want to remember not to leave it out next time. I live in the UK, used to spend a lot of my time on the road. A sandwich was always ...


5

Chubbyemu keeps me up at a night too. But remember, when you're looking up case studies and very rare stories and situations, they will always be as crazy as possible. If people do get sick from clean containers, they would have used that as the basis for the story, not eating 5 day old pasta. Remember, the point of both internet clickbait stories and ...


1

What would make them unsafe? Oats are shelf stable. Milk is refrigerator stable for quite some time.


5

Muscovado sugar is a partially refined sugar. Hence, it has a lot of what is essentially molasses contained in it. The molasses can migrate, leaving whiter areas; also scraping with a spoon, e.g., can leave whiter areas. To reconsitute, place in a jar with a piece of bread or covered with a damp cloth (what I do). Within a few hours, it should be nice ...


0

Balsamic vinegar contains sugar. Sometimes a lot of sugar. The mold you are seeing is probably related to that, and would be very unlikely to happen on regular vinegar.


-1

Your problem is not so much the potato, which doesn't really need refrigeration, but what might have been put into it by the store. Any butter would probably be fake :-), but what else might have been in there? Sour cream? Also, what you should really worry about is the amount of plastic you ingested by heating up the poor potato still wrapped in plastic, ...


0

I was surprised to find mold growing on balsamic vinegar. Maybe it's because the top was not screwed on tightly.


-1

You could theoretically salvage the butter, but it really boils down to mold type. Melting and filtrating the butter will get rid of the mold and create ghee. But filtration will not remove aflatoxins that some types of molds produce.


4

This layer just means some milk proteins have cooked onto the bottom of the pan, and says nothing at all about the age or condition of the milk. It's more likely when you boil a smaller quantity due to the more rapid heating. During can help avoid this. However repeated heating and cooling isn't generally a good idea. With milk you can get away with it but ...


5

It's one thing to buy salami which comes with its own built-in mold, but to let one develop some possibly different mold spontaneously in the fridge? If nothing else the fridge would not provide the ventilation which I understand is an essential part of the process (that's why you hang them and don't pile them up on a shelf). Worse, I see a seam on the ...


-2

I have seen dozens of different size/shape sausages hanging in a gourmet deli at room temperature , all were mostly white with mold. However, I can't say I ate any.


2

What sort of food? Many, if not most foods sold at room temperature are perfectly fine some time after their date, which is usually a best before (quality) date. Most chilled foods have a use by date, which is about safety while there's some margin built in to this, no one's going to tell you it's safe to eat things after their use by date, because ...


1

In general, if it smells and taste "off", DO NOT EAT IT.


5

As far as I can see, phytohaemagglutinin should be mostly present in red kidney beans or fava beans. (from wikipedia and https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3153292/) I looked at Tolerant Food product list on their web site and they only use lentils (red and green) and Chickpea products. So, you should be good; but in any cases, if you feel unsafe,...


2

It can depend on the manufacturer, and on the lid. You may be associating the pop with metal lids, where you'll often see is a small circle in the middle of the lid, which is part of tamper-proofing. When the jar is sealed at the factory, it is sealed under pressure so that the circle is depressed. When you open the jar at home, the pressure equalizes, and ...


3

Here's an answer from the FDA website for pasteurizing whole eggs: Egg pasteurization uses a water bath and motion to ensure that whole eggs are pasteurized without cooking the eggs. Egg whites coagulate at 140 °F. Therefore, heating an egg above 140 °F would cook the egg, so processors pasteurize the egg in the shell at 130 °F for 45 minutes.


4

Plastic usually does not pop, it bends slowly under the pressure differential. Metal usually bends quickly and pops when the vacuum in a jar is relieved. Some jars use thicker metal that wont bend, so you have to listen for the rushing intake of air. Sometimes now they replace air with nitrogen before sealing. You won't get a pop or any other sound from a ...


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