New answers tagged

1

I have had mason jars break when filling with hot items. It is best to warm the jar first, just by running hot water into it. A someone else pointed out, a mason jar is, of course, not insulated. You mention this is to take to work, I assume for lunch or dinner. I also want to point out that you need to consider food safety, as your soup will soon be in ...


1

For the first part, about pouring hot soup in mason jars, it should be safe, but there's always a risk of shattering if the liquid is too hot. There are many somewhat related topics regarding putting hot liquid in mason jars. Is it safe to put fresh hot soup in a glass mason jar? https://www.reddit.com/r/NoStupidQuestions/comments/9rd3y2/...


0

The main problem with cutting boards and sanitation is that you, well, cut them. Those cuts produce channels where bacteria can hide and survive even a good cleaning. But the main worry is with wooden cutting boards, because of how they get cut (cuts on a wooden board produce deeper more 'cavernous' channels where bacteria can hide) but also because they ...


2

I always considered the advice to be like a second level of defense: Proper cleaning should be enough to make the board suitable for any task. And not everyone has multiple boards, just saying. However, nothing and nobody is infallible. Using separate boards for various uses helps in the rare cases when something went wrong or someone did a sloppy job. In ...


3

I'm not sure I understand the question. In a cleaning situation, where you are using soap and water, there is no reason you can not clean your boards together. Once you have clean boards, there is no reason they cannot be stored together. The potential issue is cross-contamination. If there are no contaminates, there is no issue.


5

You do not need to throw out the pan Metals tend to be impervious to absorption of much in the way of plastics (or anything else), which is part of the reason they make great cooking implements. If the plastic is on the cooking surface and that surface was seasoned, to be absolutely sure, I would recommend that you remove the seasoning and re-season. If ...


0

Those bugs you see occur in berries of all sorts. They're the larvae of fruit flies. Although they are not harmful, you can soak them in salt water if you want to rid of them.


-2

Smell it and you’ll know if it’s bad. They say regardless of expiration date, it’s good for one week after opening but I’ve had some 3 weeks after opening and it’s still good so I guess just smell it to see


1

I am using flour that expired in 2018. I had to use some of my emergency flour due to the corona virus shortages. Its pretty good but not as good as fresh. Id say 90% as good tasting. Yeast on the other hand is different. Ive had a one pound block of yeast in the freezer since 2014 and it still works. Not very well but it works. I have to double up the ...


9

To further @Tetsujin's answer. The Lysol product you have specified as Lysol Clean & Fresh Multi-Surface Cleaner is made of a number of active ingredients. The primary decontaminating component is Alkyl (50% C14, 40% C12, 10% C16) dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride. This is a member of what are known as Quaternary Ammonium Compounds or Quaternary ...


2

Lysol is a trade name, covering a whole family of quite different products. You will need to be more specific. In short, though… you rinse it with more water until it's gone. If it got inside places it shouldn't, then your choice is to attempt a DIY take-apart [really not recommended] or give it to a professional… or ignore it & eventually it the smell ...


6

I don't have a completely definitive answer. However generally, fermentation produces lactic acid which inhibits the growth of harmful bacteria, which is why it is a successful food preservation method. The yeast and bacteria that are responsible for the fermentation are often naturally occurring on many raw foods. For example with lacto-fermented ...


3

In the US, the most important thing to look for on the carton is the number which shows the day of year that the eggs were packed. If the number is 1, that's January 1st. If it's 365, That's Dec 31st. In other countries the system may be different, so find out what system in your country indicates the pack date, if possible. Note: apparently some states in ...


0

There's a type of ginger called black ginger. It's not actually black like the same suggests it's a beautiful blue, very rare and expensive. I don't know, your grocery store may have accidently mixed rare black ginger with regular ginger, I mean possible if they are selling the black gingers too. You might want to search it up. In India, it is used in ...


1

Yes, it is safe to freeze cream-based sauces, provided you thoroughly reheat it before consuming. The sauce might be a little less appealing than when freshly made, but it won't harm you. As a side note, I would definitely recommend only freezing the sauce, and cooking pasta 'to order' (if you were not planning on this already). Cooked, frozen, then ...


3

As long as there is no mold or any "off" smells, any use in which the discard gets cooked (i.e., no raw flour ends up in your final product) should be safe. After all, your starter is little more than a mixture of flour and water, the main ingredients in any number of baking recipes. The internet is littered with recipes using sourdough discard. A personal ...


9

The first question is maybe how long they should last after opening? A week or two? Months? Years? The second question is IMHO the "mode" of spoiling for that produce and what conservation agents are there already. For some produce this is quite doable: sugar as conservation agent: Syrups with sufficiently high sugar content (> 80 % or so, that is like ...


1

You can remove any salt like this by diffusion/osmosis - basically by soaking with multiple changes of water over a period of time. This technique is used to make preserved salted-fish edible. How long you need to do this for will depend on the thickness of the fish and the concentration of the salt. You can determine this empirically by experimenting, but ...


32

Exposure to germs is the problem, once you open these they are exposed and the clock starts. If you vacuum seal you are vacuum sealing the germs in with the food, and not taking steps to kill the pathogens. Pouring into a sterilized container again just puts contaminated food into an uncontaminated container. The only way to make them shelf stable again ...


1

I would look for cheesecloth, it should be widely available. If not, yes, a white cotton shirt should be good enough, make certain it is not a blend of different fabrics; and I would wash it in boiling water before.


-2

I am new to your site so I may not understand how to view all the answers or the entire discussion, but I did not see the solution my mother taught me. You can use the same "trick" to test for freshness that you can use to test for potential contamination in your egg, so I will give the answers to both. (I noticed some people do not like you deviating from ...


1

There is nothing wrong with them. The buckwheat is probably ok because on the on the official website called Anthony’s goods every single review is a five star( in fact one of the reviews called the grassy smell you talked about “natural”)one except one review which is four stars ( the four star review was because there was a rip in the package). Plus on the ...


1

I don't see a safety risk. Oil can go rancid. That is a quality issue, rather than a safety issue. Moist sugar could potentially mold, I suppose. If you see mold forming I would discard. Otherwise, this seems like a low risk situation to me.


14

If the egg actually exploded as in the title, then no, that egg is probably highly contaminated. Not only is it bad, but nothing its contents have touched can be considered safe to use and should be discarded. I assume however that you actually have an egg that was broken in handling. In that case, only the broken egg is a loss. Other answers and ...


8

Edit after the question was substantially changed. This answer wasn't initially concerned with the fate of the broken egg itself, but the others around it. If the white 'exploded' bin it. If it 'leaked' then that egg is compromised. If you broke it, eat it today. If you don't know when it was broken, discard & treat the rest of this answer as it stood ...


5

Sure. Wash them off with a little cold water, rub them dry carefully with some paper towels in case you want to keep them for longer and not have sticky old egg whites on the outside.


1

Sweet potatoes are not in the potato family (Solanaceae) and as you say, do not develop solanine, or other glycoalkaloids such as chaconine. The only toxin they are listed as having in Medical toxicology of natural substances is ipomearone, typically produced in response to fungal infection. I cannot find any indication that is produced in response to ...


0

I really think the answers on here are misleading and could cause someone to fall ill. Fresh ordinary finger should be yellow and firm on the inside. If it looks a bit spongy or dark or has those green rings (which can be quite thick to the point there's not much yellow) it's time to toss it out. This article nicely explains the difference between bad ginger ...


1

Aluminium doesn't rust, and neither does stainless steel. In both cases this is a property of the material and not a coating. While aluminium has a layer of oxide on the surface, this gets scratched in use and reforms naturally. Either of these could be used, but aluminium is much easier to drill. Non-stick pans are usually mild steel underneath the ...


5

To answer this question a bit of physics comes in handy: Microwaves emit, well, microwaves, this is a form of electromagnetic radiation, like light or heat, with wavelengths (basically the distance between two peaks of the waves) between 1 meter (39.37") and 1 millimeter (0.039") and frequencies (number of times a wave goes up and down per second) between ...


-2

I know this question is old, but I am in the process of making lye right now. My homemade lye is potassium hydroxide, while purchased lye is sodium hydroxide. I believe that our ancestors used the same method I am using to make the lye that they used for cooking. I am using hardwood ash, from burning oak and apple wood. I collected rainwater during recent ...


3

That is mold. You should skim it off and throw it away. It's probably an indication that your acid to sugar balance is not correct. If it comes back I'd throw away your batch and try again.


0

Garlic produces non-toxic allicin and allicin in the pickling process. When allicin and allicin are mixed together, the garlic becomes a hundred green. The pickled garlic turns green not because the pickled garlic contains chlorophyll, which will produce green when exposed to sunlight like a plant, but because the garlic produces non-toxic allicin and ...


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