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This oiled pita is not getting flaky even days past w/c is ideal for stuffing and rolling it w/o breaking the bread.


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Is the supermarket meat packaged in a gas-filled plastic thing, and the butcher's isn't? If yes, that might be the cause: that gas is there to keep the meat looking red and fresh, so people will buy it. It also has the effect of making the meat look cooked much more quickly than it actually is. This is probably not a problem for steaks but it's dangerous for ...


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Going to a butcher is a very good idea, and doing some of your own butchering on larger cuts is a great way to save money and get really good quality meat. It's not a question of butcher versus supermarket though, the factors that make a difference in cooking time are: Cut: The word steak is a generic term for a small cut of meat cut across the muscle ...


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There are three ways in which a protein can be denatured: Chemically (for example, the 'cooking' of protein like fish by acid, as in ceviche). Through heat. Through mechanical force. I will assume that in your situation, chemical denaturation does not occur. From a quick search through some scientific literature, mechanical protein denaturation is a fairly ...


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Red palm oil, meaning unrefined palm oil, likely has more medium-chain fatty-acids than the refined version. It of course has the various vitamins/anti-oxidants which give the red color. I made the same mistake a few years ago thinking I could use it for high-heat saute/pan-frying and still get a boost of Vitamin E and lycopene. Because some of its fatty-...


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There are 3 primary colors, that being red, yellow, and blue. Most foods are red and yellowish due to the fact that blue is very rare in nature. Here is an article you can check out Why is the colour blue so rare in nature? Now, you might ask, why is green so common then if green is a combination of blue and yellow, and blue is so rare? The pigmentation for ...


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A stock reduced to a syrup is known as a glace. Glace is French for "glaze". The glace is used to flavor sauces. If you stop the cooking before it becomes a syrup, you have what is known as a demi-glace. If you cook it beyond the syrup phase it will probably burn. These are intended to be highly flavorful preparations.


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If you reduce filtered broth all the way, you get portable soup. It dries down into a solid that looks a bit like leather. Because of the gelatin from the bones, portable soup is bendy and flexible. It was used in the 18th century as a portable food item, eg by soldiers and people traveling through the American wilderness. There's an excellent video by ...


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Removing all the liquid out of stock is essentially how bouillon is made. If you managed to dehydrate the stock without burning it, you'll be left with a big disk of bouillon at the bottom of your pot, similar to the cubes you buy at the grocery. If you leave it with just a little water, you'll have a gooey bouillon paste.


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I use salt and STTP when I make burgers and bakso, (that’s the hard meatballs). Sodium Tripolyphosphate (STPP) There is an article on it that may be of interest. https://journal.ugm.ac.id/istapproceeding/article/view/32675


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While I can't talk directly to the idea of adding air to a starch, I can mention some experiments I have done. Perhaps you could try whipping your starch mix before dehydrating to capture and trap some air. Note that many puffed cereals are puffed due to the expanding action of steam due to small amounts of water (puffed rice, prawn crackers, popcorn). I ...


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This is honestly a shot in the dark, but could you try an air fryer? Google says they work for prawn chips. The air fryer is meant to mimic the intense heat of a deep fryer without the fat. So if a friend has one, it might be worth a shot. It's obviously another piece of equipment, but nothing commercial grade. That said, have you attempted baking with any ...


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