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8

There is little reason, aside from the obvious ones you already mention, to avoid the coldest setting. You might be concerned with scoop-ability of some frozen desserts, but that probably will not be too much of an issue for store-bought products, which are often stabilized for texture. Also, these can be removed in advance to temper. The Institute for ...


25

One possible consideration is that some frozen desserts (most notably ice creams and sorbets) can be very difficult to scoop if your freezer is too cold. Optimal serving temperature for ice cream is between about 5 & 10°F (-15°C & -12°C); colder freezers may result in difficult scooping and/or needing to leave the ice cream out to thaw. The ...


5

There are two things that can happen if the freezer is too cold for extended periods of time: You'll get more ice build-up (especially with frequent use) and The food inside will have more freezer burn than expected Note that some more modern freezers have a "quick freeze" setting that drops the freezer temperature for a few hours and then ...


2

Answering my own question. All the answers above are effective somewhat. But I have found full proof solution that will keep the fish/food getting stuck. Its an easy process. After placing fish/food in the freezer and couple of hours gone and the food are not stuck yet, try to move around the fish/food in the freezer. Do it two/three times. And thats it. The ...


1

Oxygen does not keep it red…it oxidises the meat and causes it to go brown. This is why refrigerated and old meat goes brown. Vacuum sealing meat keeps it red.


1

If you can get a decent insulator (e.g. cooler), and the other items are significant thermal mass, you should be able to leave them outside the freezer for a few hours without too much trouble. If you want to give yourself a bit more time, you can set the freezer extra cold first, then take the items out. Adding water bottles and/or freezer pads first can ...


1

Take everything out of the freezer and store it temporarily in boxes. You want to group small items together in bags, and then wrap everything (like every box or big bag) in towels or other clothing to keep it from defrosting. You will finally reach your fish at the bottom. Then use any combination of methods others have suggested, including chiseling out ...


3

If you have a single layer of something that's frozen to the bottom of the freezer, you can put hot water in a container (e.g. a Zip-Lock bag) and place that on top of the item you want to unstick. This will apply a significant amount of heat that's reasonably localized to that one item/area, and isn't something which you have to be personally present ...


-1

I think the easiest way is to pour hot water on it.


2

Besides the answers already given which address the long term solution, try using a hair dryer. Since it can be directed, you can target the items that you want.


8

You can sometimes break stuff free from ice, but you have to be careful not to damage the fridge, so you shouldn't use sharp tools. What you want for something like this is a block of wood (like a short section of 2x4). Place the block of wood against the food to be removed, and then hit it with a hammer. This won't always work. Some food will break before ...


25

For the already-stuck fish: no, there is no way. Don't try to chisel them out, I've known somebody who damaged their freezer that way. For any fish you will be placing there in the future: find a packaging material which will not stick to the freezer. Plastic bags are the most common way of doing it. You also have to ensure that your freezer's bottom is dry. ...


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