19

I think it's a bad idea... Crepes are made with a batter (as opposed to a dough) spread thin over a hot metal plate (seasoned or oiled). A baking stone has a porous surface and I suppose the batter would just get stuck to your stone. It doesn't happen with a dough because it has enough structure to not fill every pore of the stone on contact. On the other ...


17

No, don't do it. Good crepes are made within narrow parameters of heat exchange. You can observe this when making crepes on the stovetop - the first crepe is almost always bad. The pan seems to be either not hot enough, or too hot. After the first one, it somehow "stabilizes", or extra heat starts to creep on you. In the second case, it will get too hot ...


16

Take a look at this photo: The feet are the ruffles on the edges.


14

The simplest way to see the difference is to compare the cut diagrams: British French Images courtesy of Wikipedia - Cut of Beef The main difference is in how certain areas are sub-divided. We can see that faux-filet is part of the British sirloin, and entrecote is partly forerib and partly sirloin.


13

Slugs are not poisonous, but in the wild can pick up the parasite Angiostrongylus cantonensis, also known as rat lungworm, from rodent scat. The parasites can produce a toxic reaction that causes eosinophilic meningitis in humans.


10

The meringue should be glossy and form soft peaks. When you take your whisk out of the meringue it should look like this: The French say that when you take the whisk out of the meringue, it has to look a bit like a bird's beak, hence the way the meringue forms a soft peak slightly pointing downwards. But to be honest, I don't believe that is you problem. I ...


9

I can only guess that something from the herbs has "disturbed the balance of the mix" and is preventing it from setting. Putting my chemist's hat on, the problem is similar to what happens when a solid reaction product forms an emulsion and refuses to precipitate. When that happens, there are ways to induce precipitation, but not all of them can be applied ...


8

Worcestershire Sauce is added where the recipe wants a fast way to develop or add savoury richness, umami. It's often used where umami would develop over time with slow careful cooking (and heavy bottomed pans). Adding this extra ingredient is a good cheat where you just want that kick without the wait.


8

Typically you should use yellow onions for cooking. They have a higher sulphur content and are more flavorful after cooking. Raw, a red onion will taste more pungent. However, once cooked it is more mild and sweet than a soup would require. Red, as well as other sweeter onions, have more sugar and water than their yellow counterparts. For more details on the ...


8

A macaron (won't go into the dispute over macaron or macaroon) is a semi-foam/liquid composed of a meringue folded into tant-pour-tant (half and half of icing sugar and ground almonds). When they are baked the top shell layer of the macaron cooks and it means that the macaron can no longer expand and must rise up, this forms a frilled ruffle or foot.


8

It's called an "omelet", but it's scrambled eggs, well formed into an omelet shape Cook scrambled eggs, and just before they set (20 ish seconds) fold them, and tip the pan to roll them in the curve of the pan to form the classic omelet shape and serve. Since the eggs are not yet fully set, the outer surface will form a smooth omelet appearance You need a ...


8

it all “boils down” to setting the sauce at the right temperature. To make it fool-proof, you need precise temperature control, which you can achieve with a sous-vide setup. To make sous-vide hollandaise, you just need to combine all your ingredients together and cook at 75°C for 30 minutes (these figures are from a chefsteps recipe, you can play with the ...


7

If you buy a French baguette in the morning, you can use it as weapon or vehicle jack in the evening. It is no surprise that a Frenchman, Jean-Baptiste Boussingault, tried 1852 to prevent this by hermetically sealing the bread, as he thought the problem is merely the loss of moisture - and who then learned, that his lovely baguette would still go stale ...


6

There isn't a standardised shape as such, but the rugby ball shape is common. To achieve this shape, all you have to do is cook your omelette (French style uses a super-hot pan and lots of butter), then roll three quarters of it up in the pan. Then nudge the omelette up the side of the pan a little, so that it partly protrudes over the edge, which will ...


6

For escargots, land snails are used. Most common are the species Helix pomatia, Helix aspersa and Helix lucorum*. There are two restrictions: it should be edible (problem solved if you work with one of those three) and it should be large. Larger snails have more flesh to work with. You have to be a bit lucky for this. There's quite some variation. I think - ...


6

It is most probably crema di balsamico, a quite popular condiment, even often only used for decorative purposes. It can both be used with savory dishes, but also with sweet dishes, as in e.g. ice cream or gelato. Traditionally, crema di balsamico is made by reducing grape juice and optionally wine to the point where the sugar in the grape juice starts to ...


6

Well, it seems that Mazarin's predecessor (and at the time, mentor), Cardinal Richelieu, was instrumental in the creation of the Treaty of Bärwalde, which made Sweden and France steadfast allies (with the French basically funding nearly forty thousand Swedish soldiers). Once Mazarin replaced Richelieu there were already strong diplomatic ties between the two ...


6

Having some butter squidge out is par for the course. However, if this is more than can be folded back in (I've seen beautiful croissants from mis-shapen dough) then the question is: was your butter pliable or brittle? Brittle so that chunks fall out like ice sheets? More pliable butter is achieved by adding 10% it's weight in flour (lower gluten variety). ...


6

As far as I can see, slugs are not used for human food. There are a few references that can be found on the internets, but it is not common. For example feral food is just about what I found. in the case of snails, only a few species are used for food (in french), and they are "raised" in a safe and controlled environment.


5

The only time I've ever heard of something similar is Salt Potatoes www.nytimes.com/2008/08/22/travel/escapes/22rNYfood.html allrecipes.com/recipe/syracuse-salt-potatoes/ en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salt_potatoes but I've never seen them done in a pressure cooker. However, most pressure cooking charts (http://fastcooking.ca/pressure_cookers/...


5

You can be quite free with your sugar amount, depending on what you want to achieve. I would say that as a rule of thumb, you don't want to create too great a contrast between your sauce and your other components. So, if you are using it for dipping fruit, you can use less sugar than usual, else the fruit will be perceived as too sour. For a rich torte, you ...


5

In an answer to another question, someone else was looking for answers on dealing with thickening dairy. If you want to address thickening with corn starch, here are some beginning steps; Use the right ratio of corn starch slurry to liquid: 1 tablespoon corn starch thickens 1 cup of liquid Use the corn starch in a slurry: although you didn't mention clumps (...


5

Hi for anyone interested, the chef himself has put up videos of his recipe, and techniques. Apologies for the long post; I know it's an old thread lol...just thought I'd post it just in case:) Omuraisu recipe: 30g chicken thigh,70g onions,15g seasonal greens (he's using komatsuna),10g any mushrooms (he's using king oyster), 150g cold rice, 10g butter, 200ml ...


5

Sweet pickles, miniature if you're not dicing them, it doesn't matter if you are dicing them. Look for a bit of crunch; cornichons provide texture as well as flavor.


5

Simply, langoustines are much smaller and a portion is several. A langouste is large; one would be big enough for 1--2 people. Other names for langoustines include (from wikipedia): Nephrops norvegicus, Norway lobster, Dublin Bay prawn, or scampi In French, a longer version of the name is Langoustine commune (again wikipedia): Contrairement à ce que ...


5

Salt is salt is salt. That being said, most regular salt comes from salt mining, which tend to be neutral as there is no (or lot less) additional minerals (or other stuff) in the salt that will change the taste. Sel the Guérande is a sea salt, it comes from evaporation of sea water, since the sea water contains a lot more minerals and "stuff", like algae. ...


5

If the recipe said to simmer them slowly with the meat, you might be pleasantly surprised as they could blend in with the other flavors. (Or not, but it might be worth a try with a smaller amount.) But in the given recipe, a not-so-small amount gets added shortly before the end of the cooking time, which seems intended to keep the original olive flavor (a ...


5

It is common to eat 'soupe de poissons' with emmental.


4

Apart from the fact that French and British cuts are differently named, the hindquarters are cut at different angles, which is why British cuts tend to be a lot more tender and easy to carve than their French counterparts. Someone commented that 'Fillet doesn't exist in British cuts'? As someone (literally) born & brought up in a butcher's shop, I've ...


4

The sauce will thicken when cooled. And as for consistency... It really depends on individual taste. The usual test is "When you did a spoon into the sauce, does the sauce coat the spoon upon removal?" However, I like my sauces a bit thicker. Tempered choco. is about my tastes, however alot of people would like it a bit thinner. It's all a matter of taste. ...


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