20

In a traditional British chip shop, you would have got your chips (fries for Americans) in yesterday's newspaper, wrapped into a cone shape. These days of course, it's food grade greaseproof paper, but it's still in the same shape. I suspect the reason for serving chips in a cone is that simple tradition. Also, there may be thermal reasons, that it allows ...


11

All of the sources I read say the same thing... what makes them different is that they're fried twice. From Saveur: Frites are the supercharged cousin to paltry American-style fries: made from soft Belgian potatoes called bintjes, they're thick-cut and—this is key—double-fried (in the olden days, in molten horse or ox fat, though modern options range ...


10

French fried potatoes (or as the British say, chips) are a deep fried food. In fact, the US term "to french fry" orignally simply meant to deep fry, although simply "french fry" has now come to mean the dish of french fried potatoes. As such, they inherently are not a low fat or small-oil-volume food. If you are asking how you can create these with less ...


10

You can try a few things: dredge the fries in cornstarch (whack them in a plastic bag, give it a good shake), shake off the excess, then season. ensure the fries are in a single layer in the pan - crowding and stacking will mean they steam, not roast when they're nearly done, turn the oven off and leave them in there for 20 minutes or so before serving. I ...


10

Here, check this out. This is an article explaining at length how to make perfect French fries. How to make perfect McDonald's style French Fries So basically, you have to cut your fries so that they are 1/4 inch thick an then blanch them in boiling vinegared water (1 tablespoon per quart of water) for about 10 minutes. This has to be done to keep the ...


9

Both. Is it soggy with moisture? Or is it soggy with oil? In both cases, the problem isn't excess oil, after all, French Fries are usually deep fried. The problem is that the moisture isn't adequately driven out of the fry and/or that the fries sit in cold oil. The crispiest French fries (read that non-soggy) are first soaked in cold water to remove excess ...


9

Not to take anything away from the answers already existing for this question, but I want to add one more reference: Kenji Alt's in depth opus on creating the McDonald's style fry at home. In summary, his method is to: Blanche the cut potatoes in water lightly acidified with vinegar, to allow them to cook through while the acid keeps the pectin from ...


9

Yes it IS possible to create a "pringles" like product using just a few simple items that you probably already have in your home. I will post the ingredients after I list the few items you need. First you will need a mixing bowl, a measuring cup, measuring spoons, and a pasta maker (to help flatten the dough). If you do not have a pasta making machine, do ...


9

Isn't the oil (and bad oil temperature), the main reason for calories in fried food, not the vegetables themselves? Just coating in corn starch will not help at all, the moisture in the vegetable will still make them limp and oily. If you do a tempura or batter type frying, then the batter itself becomes the calories sponge. If you want to make "lower" ...


9

They just look like gimmick frying basket used for serving. When you fry things, you need to have "space" in the fryer to have a good consistent frying so that you have as much surface of the ingredients touch the hot oil as possible. If the ingredients get clustered together, they will stick and probably not cook evenly.


7

I take a piece of aluminum foil, crumple it up then smooth it out somewhat still leaving slight concave and convex angles for the fries to crisp evenly without the need of flipping halfway through baking.


7

The paper cone is a traditional single serve package shape for street vendors, so you can walk away with your chips (fries), and eat while walking. Many street vendors set up shop near parks and beaches (dunes) It is used in other countries too for a single serve, though many use a punnet (cone with point cut off), so it can sit on a park bench etc. For ...


7

There are a few questions on this site about French fries, I'd suggest you take a look. But I think the best answer is: baked sticks of potato do not French fries make. French fries are deep fried. You can never get the same results in air, although air fryers do come close. A normal oven bakes, not fries. Here are some sites that experiment with fries and ...


7

Regarding potatoes, not sweet potatoes: It's actually great to precut potatoes for French fries, it gives you an opportunity to soak them in water, which removes the starch and simple sugars from the outside of the fries and even from just below the surface. In fact, many if not most places that make fresh cut French fries do cut the fries in advance and ...


7

As long as you are cooking both, as you suggest in your question, there is no danger. Any potential hazard will not survive the heat of cooking.


6

They won't be as good as when fresh (of course) but generally: You want the oven pretty hot. How hot depends on the oven, size of fry, etc., but a good first guess would be 425°F–450°F. On most toaster ovens I've seen, that'd be as hot as it goes. Let the oven preheat. Unfortunately, heating the oven is going to take longer than your five minutes, probably ...


6

The cheese you saw was, if it was real cheese at all, probably cheddar or just plain white cheese. Whatever they put on was not high-quality stuff - takeaways are not known for lavishing money on ingredients. Whether you will be able to get anything similar depends on where you are. American and British cheddars have different flavors, so if I was in the ...


6

French fries are often double-fried: They are par-fried at a low temperature, to cook all the way through, after which they are often frozen They are finish-fried at a higher temperature to crisp up and be hot for presentation The type of potato matters--high starch like Idahos are ideal. Here is a link to a Serious Eats article by Kenji Alt describing ...


6

I rarely bother to deep fry fries. I buy them precut, blanched and frozen in the supermarket and bake them in the oven. If I bake them as intended, they are fluffy on the inside. If I forget them in there for about double the time, they become harder and crispier throughout. I don't think you can imitate this with a fryer only, because you need a certain ...


5

I know I'm a bit late here, but I do have an alternative to frying twice. If you don't want to fry twice, you can also boil the french fries in water that has one or two tablespoons of vinegar or lemon juice for about 15 minutes. You have to allow the fries to cool down after the boiling, at least until the steam is no longer present, before frying. This ...


5

There are a couple tricks I've learned from Cook's Illustrated about making oven fries: Soak your cut potatoes in warm water to rinse off excess surface starch. Drain them and dry them very well (I use a salad spinner and paper towels). Use a heavy duty sheet pan on the bottom rack of a hot oven to focus the heat on crisping the bottoms of the potatoes. Oil ...


5

Yes, the oil can be a major difference. Many Belgian fries were cooked in horse fat, or a combination of horse & beef fat. Although most American fries are cooked in vegetable oils, McDonalds previously used part beef fat. I would argue that using animal fats for cooking is one of the major differences between Belgian and American fries ... but there'...


5

Freezing fries opens up their texture and makes them more fluffy. This is helpful for regular fries or sweet potato fries. Sweet potatoes have too much sugar and not enough starch to crisp up on their own. The only crispy sweet potato fries I have ever made- or eaten- were coated in starch to provide the crispiness. While I haven't tried this exact recipe- ...


5

I tried out the following procedures with Air Fried french fries and concluded that the best way to make them is to cut, wash and air-fry. Note: Any kind of "frying" here refers to air-frying. Also, the potatoes were picked from the same batch, they were cut in exactly the same way with the same width, using a cutting tool. Blanching in water, freezing in ...


4

Its more than likely what they call 'Pizza Cheese' which is a mix of mozzarella and mild chedder.


4

The two time fry method is the one we use here in Belgium too. (Never seen it fry more than once by design). The temperature is very important. We usually use a sunflower based oil but traditionally (but unfortunately unhealthily) we use ox fat. (At least I think it is called that in English). Basically it is a fat from cows. At room temperature it is a ...


4

Use the refined coconut oil. And not only for temperature reasons... I admit to not liking the taste of coconut in many cases... but I particularly don't want my french fries tasting like them. That may not be universally the case for all people, but if you want a neutral-flavored oil, unrefined coconut oil is not that. You will end up tasting only coconut, ...


4

I haven't noticed regular potatoes being sweet when overcooked, undercooked, or even raw. So I don't think the sweetness was due to cooking time. However, according to http://www.finecooking.com/article/the-science-of-cooking-potatoes-2 (and many other places on the internet), potatoes stored in the refrigerator will turn sweet as their starches ...


4

Any salt added during the soaking step won’t make your fries significantly salty, during blancing the potatoes will precook and absorb some water and if salted, some salt (a 3% brine is suggested here). But the average French fry recipes I am familiar with typically don’t salt the water and many don’t parboil. - I never salted any soaking water and still got ...


3

The French way or Belgian way (hard to make the difference) to make them is: 1/ Choose the right potato bread, I don't know which ones are available where you live, but for instance, in France or in Belgium, "bintje" is fine. It doesn't absorb oil too much. Having the right potato is very important. The best ones for french fries are the mealy one. 2/ Wash ...


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