10

I read that as 2 cups of Greek yogurt made from whole milk (ie not low- or non-fat yogurt). The comma does make it confusing, however.


3

-18°C (-0.4°F) is not too low for storage (as this would be the normal temperature of a household freezer, where I store my ice cream and frozen yogurt. I definitely wouldn't set the temperature higher if I store also other stuff in the same freezer). For serving you would probably want to let it sit out a little bit, so that it softens up a little so that ...


3

This link should help you. It should be ok at least a week or two past the use by date. http://www.eatbydate.com/dairy/yogurt-shelf-life-expiration-date/


2

One of the reasons it melted quickly was the Bailey's Irish Cream. One of your guesses is to reduce the amount of alcohol. Alcohol lowers the freezing/melting point - it makes the mixture harder to freeze and quicker to melt. I would make the frozen yogurt without alcohol, then serve it with a splash of liqueur over the top. And I'm suspicious from your ...


2

First, you shouldn't have the expectations that your ice cream (or frozen yogurt, or whatever) will turn out to be like storebought. You can get to a "better than now" state, but not to a "out of the heart brand tub" state. For your ideas, some are off the mark, some are worth trying. 1) a hydrocolloid is generally good in ice cream, since it binds water ...


2

I have read somewhere (maybe The Perfect Scoop? But I don't have the book here to check) that the best storage temperature for home-made ice creams and other frozen desserts is -6°C. And I have the same problem as you, with homemade desserts being generally too hard, even without the presence of noticeable crystals. They just don't have as much overrun and ...


2

This is a very normal thing to do. The result is not called yogurt, but sour cream. You can use yogurt, especially lactobacillus yogurt, as a starter for full-fat sour cream of the Eastern European type. The fermentation process is the same as for yogurt. It gets a very nice characteristic smell which is different from that of yogurt. It might stay slightly ...


1

You can add cream to milk when making yogurt. This will increase the fat content. However, if by "creamy", you are referring to texture of your yogurt, there are other variables that contribute besides fat content. See this question, for example. Also, there are variables besides fat (sugar content, for example) that influence the texture of frozen ices.


1

Yes, you’re right, invert sugar slows down the crystal formation and improves the texture of frozen products. The way I use invert sugar in most frozen products is as a direct substitutue for the added sugar; for the frozen yogurt, it is no exception. You can just follow your recipe and replace the sugar with invert sugar by 80% to 100% of the weight of the ...


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