10

I read that as 2 cups of Greek yogurt made from whole milk (ie not low- or non-fat yogurt). The comma does make it confusing, however.


3

-18°C (-0.4°F) is not too low for storage (as this would be the normal temperature of a household freezer, where I store my ice cream and frozen yogurt. I definitely wouldn't set the temperature higher if I store also other stuff in the same freezer). For serving you would probably want to let it sit out a little bit, so that it softens up a little so that ...


3

This link should help you. It should be ok at least a week or two past the use by date. http://www.eatbydate.com/dairy/yogurt-shelf-life-expiration-date/


2

One of the reasons it melted quickly was the Bailey's Irish Cream. One of your guesses is to reduce the amount of alcohol. Alcohol lowers the freezing/melting point - it makes the mixture harder to freeze and quicker to melt. I would make the frozen yogurt without alcohol, then serve it with a splash of liqueur over the top. And I'm suspicious from your ...


2

First, you shouldn't have the expectations that your ice cream (or frozen yogurt, or whatever) will turn out to be like storebought. You can get to a "better than now" state, but not to a "out of the heart brand tub" state. For your ideas, some are off the mark, some are worth trying. 1) a hydrocolloid is generally good in ice cream, since it binds water ...


2

I have read somewhere (maybe The Perfect Scoop? But I don't have the book here to check) that the best storage temperature for home-made ice creams and other frozen desserts is -6°C. And I have the same problem as you, with homemade desserts being generally too hard, even without the presence of noticeable crystals. They just don't have as much overrun and ...


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