Hot answers tagged

29

There's no trick, there's math. 100g of banana is about 75g of water (1g of water is 1ml, so easy to measure), 12g of sugar, and 13g of fiber and other stuff. A pumpkin is about 92g of water and 3 grams of sugar, leaving 5g of other stuff. My banana bread recipe calls for 2 medium bananas, that's about 250g of banana. That's 188g of water and about 30g ...


9

There are several hits on google, and many videos illustrating how to de-seed a watermelon. Most have you cut the watermelon length-wise to expose the rows of seeds, which are generally in a circle down the center of the melon (imagining the pattern if you were to look through the end). When you cut lengthwise, you expose the rows of seeds. I prefer to ...


8

Baking is part science, part alchemy, and part luck. There are so many variable you can't control when you bake that you really need to use your senses and instruments to determine when something is done. If you are substituting in a recipe, you definitely want to account for the water difference, so this is an astute question. If you can estimate how ...


6

The way I, and all my fellow country-men and women do it, works only on well ripened water melons. Imagine the watermelon is the globe and the stem is the north pole. Start cutting it at about 75 degree latitude along longitude lines, keeping the knife as perpendicular to the surface as possible (towards the south pole that will not be possible any more). ...


6

Simply, you don't. Your post describes a method which starts with whole fruit, doesn't use heat or alcohol, is achievable in a home kitchen, and has a high yield. Such a method simply doesn't exist. Your assumption that "if the food industry does it, I should be able to do it too" is wrong. The food industry doesn't do it. It uses engineered flavors, which ...


5

If you add chocolate and nuts, no. They can be added without any adjustments, as they don't tend to affect the rest of the cake at all. Fresh fruit is a bit trickier, since it tends to release a great deal of liquid when cooked which can make the result soggy. In general, if you add fresh fruit to a cake you want to toss it in some starch (eg corn starch or ...


5

From Ask An Expert: These symptoms are characteristic of a physiological disorder called bitter pit, which is the result of a calcium deficiency. This may be the result of inadequate calcium in the soil. Bitter pit does not necessarily indicate low soil calcium, although consistent bitter pit for several years certainly points in that direction. Anything ...


5

I'm sure that there area a zillion recipes for both breads. I found a recipe for two 9x5 loafs. Pumpkin bread using One 15-ounce can pure pumpkin puree. Banana bread using eight very ripe bananas (unpeeled, about 32 ounces?). Most of the ingredients are similar, but the seasoning varies. I assume that the desire with the pumpkin bread recipe is to have ...


5

The vast majority of dried vine fruits are coated in one vegetable oil or another. The ones I’ve seen which name the oil tend to use sunflower oil or cottonseed oil. They use them to prevent the vine fruits clumping. Sunmaid are one of the few mass producers which declare that they don’t use oils or glazes.


4

The stickiness is similarly stubborn as trying to clean up pine sap, where regular soap often will not clean it up. Instead, try using mineral oil to clean up. You might have mineral oil in the kitchen for oiling cutting boards. ("Baby oil" is a form of mineral oil that also has fragrances added.) Simply rub the sticky utensils with a towel and mineral oil ...


3

It depends on how ripe the cherries were before maceration but, generally speaking, they should be safe to eat! From William Sonoma: Because sugar is a natural preservative, macerating is a great method for extending the life of berries that are less than perfect in appearance or just past their prime. Fruit prepared this way can last for up to three or ...


2

There isn't that much more you can do. Fresh figs are perishable items, and before you get them you don't know how they've been stored. Moisture is your enemy here, the drier they stay the longer mold will stay at bay. The containers you buy them in often trap moisture so I would remove them from that packaging and store them in the refrigerator, on a shelf, ...


2

There is no particularly easy way, you have to manually remove the seeds as most of them are still connected to the fruit. The way to make it efficient is to slice it thinly, remove the seeds you can see on one side, flip and remove from the other side, then cut it up into smaller chunks after you de-seed it. I use a spoon to de-seen mine, but I hold it ...


2

A great way to add fruit to yogurt is to use a jam, jelly, or fruit preserve of choice. By cooking out the liquid and thickening with sugar and pectin, a jelly ends up much less watery than a fruit puree. Depending on the fruit you are starting with and the desired texture, the exact recipe will vary. Store-bought jams work as well. If you are looking for a ...


2

We use tongs to pull the pear/fruit from the cactus and collect in an empty 5 gallon plastic bucket - we then used the tongs to hold each one over the sink while we scrubbed the pricks off with a small knife washing each one as we were done - we then rinsed them all in a large colander and then blended them whole - the juice is delicious


2

The flavor of juice will be more intense and sweeter than eating a fruit raw, and the mouth feel will obviously be very different. A Vitamix will heat up the juice, and heat can change many properties of your juice, including flavor and nutrition. If you only blend for a short time this shouldn't be a problem.


2

Wash them right before you use them. You could wash them when you get home, it's not going to hurt most things if you're gentle, but that won't mean they're still clean once you're ready to use them. I'm guessing you aren't storing them somewhere sterile, so they will get dirty again during storage, and you'll just have to wash them again. The other issue ...


2

According to this article, submerging strawberries in saltwater will make fruitfly larva leave the berries. Apparently the idea was popularized in May 2020 by a TikTok post. But the author goes on to say that it's probably not necessary, that consuming fruitfly eggs or larvae is not harmful (they site USDA for this claim), and soaking your strawberries in ...


2

You cannot freeze them whole; the large fruit pod will turn into a disgusting mush when you thaw it. You can, however, freeze the pips quite well, and they are the part you eat anyway.


2

From epicurious (I love their YouTube channel): You can buy hard, green guavas and allow them to ripen at room temperature. Placing them in a paper bag with a banana or apple will allow them to ripen faster. Guavas may be treated with edible wax to delay the ripening process, so you may want to rinse them off to speed ripening.


1

It sounds like you’re describing mold spores, which I’ve occasionally seen in tamarind. I don’t know of any way to check for this, short of cutting them open to check, but tamarind isn’t particularly expensive so you might just buy a bit more than you expect to need. Often people buy tamarind extract instead, which of course isn’t subject to this problem. (...


1

I believe the cause of the pineapple being ripened from the base is because of gravity pulling the juice downwards which it then ferments and turns into alcohol.


1

Yes, short quick blitzes work well. If you are using citrus fruits, and drinking it unfiltered, please keep two things in mind - it will turn bitter very quickly if you store it, and it will have roughage.


1

Cooks Illustrated solved this problem in their pumpkin cheesecake recipe by removing the water from the pumpkin puree. They simply spread the puree on a towel or paper towel.


1

Yea it turns a yellowish green and it's usually soft on the outside. You don't need to cut with knife. Your fingers can prod it open effortlessly


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible