Hot answers tagged

46

Your pan is too hot. To perfectly fry an egg--without browning--you want medium to medium-low heat; what you want is the heat at which butter will juuuust sizzle. And don't use oil. The easiest way to ensure that the residual white is cooked on top (assuming you want sunny side up) is to put a lid over the egg when it's almost cooked. Optionally splash a ...


45

You can certainly deep-fry foods in clarified butter (also known as ghee) and in lard. In fact, there are many foods that are traditionally fried in these fats. They both have very high smoke points and are excellent for making crisp fried foods. For example, Puri, Indian fried breads, are deep-fried in ghee (clarified butter). And many Southern USA and ...


41

One factor you may not be considering is the quality of the egg itself. The highest-grade eggs have firm whites and more regular shapes when cracked onto a flat surface. The fresher the egg, generally, the higher the grade. If you've ever cracked a grocery store egg next to a fresh-laid egg, the difference is clear. The hen's diet makes a big difference, too....


40

This definitely falls into the category of an accident waiting to happen. No flammable materials should ever be used in this manner. Not only is there the danger of the paper catching fire from a heating element or flame, there is also the risk of it catching fire from a pan fire (and consequently making that situation worse). However, if you want something ...


33

Onions always benefit from a few minutes on their own to soften and start sweetening. Garlic burns easily, especially when finely chopped or crushed, so in general should not be fried as long as onion. Having said that, when doing a quick stir fry or similar dish, you can throw in the garlic first for 10-20 seconds so that it flavours the oil.


31

You may need to use a little more oil/butter, but the biggest things are to not get them too hot, and to stir them fairly often. Once they're sizzling that's hot enough. Some cookers will get keep getting hotter for quite a while, so you may need to turn them down preemptively. Heavy pans will do the same but overall tend to make gentle cooking easier. You ...


28

Yes, onions contain sugar, just like most fruit and vegetables. It is not simply a common phrase, it is true caramelization. They have 4.24 g of sugar per 100 g in total (wet weight). For dry weight 40% is sugar. See the USDA nutrient database for more details.


27

Restaurants have massive fans. Commercial deep fryers have temperature control. Example temperature control unit: And massive heating elements (notice 4 temperature controls): Massive heating elements allows for even delivery of heat. When you drop frozen fish it has to kick out some heat but it is careful not to get too hot via temperature control....


26

Use a bigger pan...or much less beef in the pan. Stop stirring. If you over crowd the pan, nothing will brown. It will steam, then braise because the water can't evaporate fast enough. Secondly, browning happens when an item remains in contact with the pan. So, stirring (unless you are using very high, wok-type temperature) will only defeat the ...


24

Given your picture, I think the correct term here is saute; that is, to quickly fry in a little bit of hot fat. Pan frying uses more fat, and a lower temperature, to create a deeper crust. Probably an overkill for mussels. For a saute, you want relatively dry (pat dry with towel if necessary - frozen seafood can release a lot of water) ingredients, ...


22

I believe you are referring to this article? https://www.seriouseats.com/2012/01/the-food-lab-how-to-make-best-buffalo-wings-fry-again-ultimate-crispy-deep-fried-buffalo-wings.html Funny enough, I was reading this yesterday. And if you go through the end, Kenji gives a very scientific explanation on how double-frying your wings can make them more crispy. ...


21

Donuts are a deep fried food. The texture of deep fried food is unique and cannot be duplicated by other methods. If you bake doughnut dough, you will get small rolls, which will have a similar aroma, but not the same combination of moist, soft inside and fat-crispy outside. You could bake it, as with any other yeast dough, only nobody will recognize it as a ...


21

As @Sebastien has pointed out, your pan is too hot. His advice is spot on. While you can achieve the results you are looking for this way, you would increase your chances quite a bit by using a non-stick pan. Cooking is about controlling heat. The "water test" you describe might be good for some applications, but it is not always necessary, and it isn't ...


19

By frying your potatoes then putting the lid on, you fried your potatoes then steamed them, so it's no wonder they weren't crispy. Although it takes longer, par-boiling the potatoes first is by far the best way to get crispy on the outside, fluffy on the inside potatoes. Par-boiling cooks the inside of the potato, so that all you need to do in the pan is ...


19

As with many kitchen techniques, there's a gadget that can help! In this case, little metal rings that hold your egg in place while it's frying so the end result is nice and round. Here's an example of a set that Williams Sonoma sells: If you don't want yet another gadget, you can get better with practice. Use a small frying pan so there's less room for ...


19

No, you cannot deep-fry in butter. It simply can't handle the heat; it will brown and burn before you reach deep-frying temperatures. In a comment you say that vegetable oils are unstable when heated, but it is in fact the opposite: butter is much more unstable when heated. Butter has a smoke point of 200-250F, around 120-150C. Many vegetable oils have ...


18

Examining your questions in order: The general rule is onions first. Sauté the garlic towards the end for 30-ish seconds before removing from the heat. As ElendilTheTall correctly pointed out, garlic can scorch quickly, especially if you tend to sauté on the hot side (as I do). Starting your sauté with onions first has two advantages: it allows you to ...


17

You are frying them at too high a temperature. They just need a mild sizzle to properly cook until translucent; even lower if you are caramelizing them. Try putting your dial about halfway between what you are using and off, then adjust as needed.


16

When you cook a vegetable, such as a cut up onion, it will release water. The water initially will create an emulsion with the oil in the pan, so you won't see them as clearly separated elements, but the water will also be evaporating. When enough (perhaps all) of the water has dissipated, the emulsion breaks and you see the oil separate from the rest of the ...


16

It doesn't go into the meat, it soaks up water and becomes a slurry. The slurry is transparent, so you don't see it. If you fry it as it is, you won't prevent spraying and sticking the same way it would have been possible with a dry flour layer. If you roll it again, you will have these effects again, plus slightly more heat buffering because of the double ...


15

I used to have this fish sticking problem in my Aluminum wok. The solution (accidentally discovered) was to put the fish in the wok only after the oil is hot enough. Que: How do you decide whether the oil is hot enough? Ans: Drop one Yellow Mustard Seed in the oil. If it cracks immediately then your oil is hot enough for the fish to be dropped in. If not, ...


15

You say In the advertisements the chefs just swirl the mussels, shrimps, and octopus pieces around and produce some tasty browned pieces That's like saying "When I watch Bob Ross, he just puts paint on the brush, then moves the brush on the canvas, and a landscape emerges. I tried it and no landscape came out." What you are missing is not ...


15

An important element to cooking fish is the quality of the fish itself. Many fish processors use sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP) to preserve the fish. Unfortunately this also makes the fish absorb water. What you end up cooking is a "balloon" filled with water. As soon as the proteins begin shrinking, the excess water is expelled quickly which ...


14

I've usually found Bison Burgers, and other things made from Bison to be "drier" than it's beef cousin. Try, instead, a high-heat quick sear - no more than 30-45 seconds on each side, and then finish in the oven at a lower temperature. Let your pan heat up as hot as it can go before dropping in your steak. Cast iron is best for this since it'll lose less ...


13

Short answer: cream is far from ideal as a frying medium. In the US at least, heavy cream is about 35% milkfat. Recently, I have learned the UK has a product called double cream which is closer to 50% milkfat. So what is the rest of the cream, if it is only 50% milkfat at the high end? It is water, with dissolved milk solids and minerals. Even butter ...


13

Calamari or squid is of course famous for being difficult to cook, because it gets tough or rubbery. As Harold McGee explains in On Food and Cooking, octopus and squid meat are very rich in collagen: They are chewy when lightly cooked, tough when cooked to the denaturing temperatures of their collagen, around 120 - 130 F / 50 - 55 C, and become ...


13

It's quite likely that the steaks that ended up darker were dry when you started cooking them. If you don't dry off the surface of your steak, the heat is used to evaporate the moisture on the surface, which ends up steaming the steak rather than developing a good char/crust. The darker colors are the result of a chemical reaction that results in more ...


12

I will put this as an answer as I might be too long winded for a comment. The US, and most places have agencies that set food and food handling standards. I will not get into if those standards are the best, right, too high or low, ect., only state that those standards are when the agencies have deemed qualify as safe. I will also not comment on how well ...


12

Top tip a chef friend shared with me. Slice the onions and place them in a bowl. Microwave for 3.5 to 4 minutes then throw them into a hot (but not crazy hot) pan with a little butter and a small splash of vegetable oil (to stop the butter from burning). The microwaving softens the onions perfectly - all the pan is doing is adding a little colour. If you've ...


11

The only thing you did wrong was to try to poach an egg in oil, at least hot oil. Dropping an egg into really hot oil is going to cause all the water in the egg to turn to steam very quickly, hence the nuclear mutant effect you no doubt got. If you want to poach in oil then you need to keep the temperature way down. I don't see any reason you couldn't ...


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