Hot answers tagged

40

This definitely falls into the category of an accident waiting to happen. No flammable materials should ever be used in this manner. Not only is there the danger of the paper catching fire from a heating element or flame, there is also the risk of it catching fire from a pan fire (and consequently making that situation worse). However, if you want something ...


39

One factor you may not be considering is the quality of the egg itself. The highest-grade eggs have firm whites and more regular shapes when cracked onto a flat surface. The fresher the egg, generally, the higher the grade. If you've ever cracked a grocery store egg next to a fresh-laid egg, the difference is clear. The hen's diet makes a big difference, too....


32

Onions always benefit from a few minutes on their own to soften and start sweetening. Garlic burns easily, especially when finely chopped or crushed, so in general should not be fried as long as onion. Having said that, when doing a quick stir fry or similar dish, you can throw in the garlic first for 10-20 seconds so that it flavours the oil.


31

You may need to use a little more oil/butter, but the biggest things are to not get them too hot, and to stir them fairly often. Once they're sizzling that's hot enough. Some cookers will get keep getting hotter for quite a while, so you may need to turn them down preemptively. Heavy pans will do the same but overall tend to make gentle cooking easier. You ...


28

Yes, onions contain sugar, just like most fruit and vegetables. It is not simply a common phrase, it is true caramelization. They have 4.24 g of sugar per 100 g in total (wet weight). For dry weight 40% is sugar. See the USDA nutrient database for more details.


27

I've never been one to keep track of cooking times with meats, since it will vary wildly with meat thickness, burner strength and type, phase of the moon, etc. Edit: I forgot to answer "how to go about searing". I sear chicken like I sear beef: hard and fast. The point is to get that Maillard reaction going to add some deliciousness and texture (not to "...


27

Restaurants have massive fans. Commercial deep fryers have temperature control. Example temperature control unit: And massive heating elements (notice 4 temperature controls): Massive heating elements allows for even delivery of heat. When you drop frozen fish it has to kick out some heat but it is careful not to get too hot via temperature control....


27

Use a bigger pan...or much less beef in the pan. Stop stirring. If you over crowd the pan, nothing will brown. It will steam, then braise because the water can't evaporate fast enough. Secondly, browning happens when an item remains in contact with the pan. So, stirring (unless you are using very high, wok-type temperature) will only defeat the ...


22

There are two parts to this question, the stated part, and the unstated "are you really frying an egg if there is no oil?" For the first part, most manufacturers of non-stick pans claim that their product makes oil unnecessary, and generally I've found that to be true. A little oil helps, but "necessary" might be a stretch. To maximize your non-stickyness ...


22

You're heating the oil past its smoke point. There is no trick or technique that will prevent oil from smoking and oxidizing ("burning") at temperatures above the smoke point. It is literally being slowly destroyed at that temperature. I honestly don't know why TV chefs are so attached to the idea of cooking with olive oil when most serious attempts to ...


21

Panko won't stick to chicken (too dry), but will stick to egg. Egg won't stick to chicken (too smooth and non-absorbant), but will stick to flour. Flour will stick to chicken. Dredge first through flour, then through (well beaten) egg, then through panko. It's a tricky combination, but if you do it right the results are excellent. Any dry spices you want ...


21

Donuts are a deep fried food. The texture of deep fried food is unique and cannot be duplicated by other methods. If you bake doughnut dough, you will get small rolls, which will have a similar aroma, but not the same combination of moist, soft inside and fat-crispy outside. You could bake it, as with any other yeast dough, only nobody will recognize it as a ...


20

The key to non-stick cooking is to heat up the pan enough before adding oil. This allows the microscopic "teeth/pits" on the surface of the to pan close up as the metal expands from heating. Only after reaching this point, add oil. If the recipe calls for a lower heat, the pan will still remain non-stick even if you let it cool down, now. Otherwise, these ...


19

By frying your potatoes then putting the lid on, you fried your potatoes then steamed them, so it's no wonder they weren't crispy. Although it takes longer, par-boiling the potatoes first is by far the best way to get crispy on the outside, fluffy on the inside potatoes. Par-boiling cooks the inside of the potato, so that all you need to do in the pan is ...


18

As with many kitchen techniques, there's a gadget that can help! In this case, little metal rings that hold your egg in place while it's frying so the end result is nice and round. Here's an example of a set that Williams Sonoma sells: If you don't want yet another gadget, you can get better with practice. Use a small frying pan so there's less room for ...


17

Examining your questions in order: The general rule is onions first. Sauté the garlic towards the end for 30-ish seconds before removing from the heat. As ElendilTheTall correctly pointed out, garlic can scorch quickly, especially if you tend to sauté on the hot side (as I do). Starting your sauté with onions first has two advantages: it allows you to ...


17

You are frying them at too high a temperature. They just need a mild sizzle to properly cook until translucent; even lower if you are caramelizing them. Try putting your dial about halfway between what you are using and off, then adjust as needed.


16

If you cool a pan too quickly it could deform, especially if your using a cheap pan. A cast iron pan could crack. This is most likely to happen if you dip a hot pan in cold water. If you want to get a jump-start on cleaning, de-glaze the pan with a cup of water as you would when making gravy. Pour off this liquid and set the pan aside to cool completely.


16

When you cook a vegetable, such as a cut up onion, it will release water. The water initially will create an emulsion with the oil in the pan, so you won't see them as clearly separated elements, but the water will also be evaporating. When enough (perhaps all) of the water has dissipated, the emulsion breaks and you see the oil separate from the rest of the ...


16

It doesn't go into the meat, it soaks up water and becomes a slurry. The slurry is transparent, so you don't see it. If you fry it as it is, you won't prevent spraying and sticking the same way it would have been possible with a dry flour layer. If you roll it again, you will have these effects again, plus slightly more heat buffering because of the double ...


15

To clarify a little, there are several ways you can cook onions. You could be trying to get them to turn translucent. In which case, you can cook over medium heat, stirring frequently. This will take somewhere around 5 minutes. Preheating the pan isn't really required (especially if using a non-stick pan). If they start to brown, turn down the heat. You ...


15

This is how I cook bacon, and also produce almost perfectly flat bacon. No special tools required (Well, I'm assuming most people have the following in their kitchen). Tools Sheet Tray Cooling Rack (slightly smaller than the sheet tray) parchment paper (Optional, but makes for easier cleanup). BACON (I like the extra-thick cut). Steps Take the sheet tray ...


14

There are three ways I know of to cook the egg all the way through without turning it: Break the egg into a hot pan and turn the heat down, wait until the egg is cooked all the way through - this would probably be considered over-cooked sunny side up. Break the egg into the fat left in the pan, or the fat that has been put into the pan (there needs to be a ...


14

I've usually found Bison Burgers, and other things made from Bison to be "drier" than it's beef cousin. Try, instead, a high-heat quick sear - no more than 30-45 seconds on each side, and then finish in the oven at a lower temperature. Let your pan heat up as hot as it can go before dropping in your steak. Cast iron is best for this since it'll lose less ...


13

I used to have this fish sticking problem in my Aluminum wok. The solution (accidentally discovered) was to put the fish in the wok only after the oil is hot enough. Que: How do you decide whether the oil is hot enough? Ans: Drop one Yellow Mustard Seed in the oil. If it cracks immediately then your oil is hot enough for the fish to be dropped in. If not, ...


13

I assume you are referring to standard, grocery store, cavendish bananas- They have a ton of water and sugar and have a very delicate texture. This makes them easily disintegrate and get gummy instead of crisp. The key is to deep fry them at a fairly high heat until they are dark and crisp. It also helps to use greener bananas that will hold together ...


13

Calamari or squid is of course famous for being difficult to cook, because it gets tough or rubbery. As Harold McGee explains in On Food and Cooking, octopus and squid meat are very rich in collagen: They are chewy when lightly cooked, tough when cooked to the denaturing temperatures of their collagen, around 120 - 130 F / 50 - 55 C, and become ...


13

It's quite likely that the steaks that ended up darker were dry when you started cooking them. If you don't dry off the surface of your steak, the heat is used to evaporate the moisture on the surface, which ends up steaming the steak rather than developing a good char/crust. The darker colors are the result of a chemical reaction that results in more ...


12

First, about the temperature. Your safest option is to use a gun ;) The correct temp for shallow frying is between 150 and 190 degrees celsius. So if you have an infrared "gun" (a thermometer which neasures the temp of the surface at which it is pointed), use it to determine the stove setting at which the temperature of the dry (not ptfe coated) pan ...


12

It's not so much the taste as the texture. If they haven't been sauted first, the onions stay relatively crunchy during the rest of the cooking. The same is true of the garlic, but you'd usually have cut the garlic into much smaller pieces so it doesn't take as long to soften up, hence kicking the onion off first and adding the garlic a bit later.


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