Hot answers tagged

38

According to this article about Blumenthal's method, which also explains the other ingredient/method choices: https://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/07/dining/07curious.html The key to the Fat Duck batter is the alcohol, which does a couple of very useful things. It dissolves some of the gluten proteins in the wheat flour, so no elastic network forms and the crust ...


29

This depends on the result you are looking for. I'm not sure if you want onions that are crispy or caramelized. You describe wanting them to be crispy, but it looks like the attempt pictured was aiming for caramelized. For onion crisps, you need to deep fry in plenty of oil, as the comments suggest. You should take care that your onion slices of pieces are ...


24

Given your picture, I think the correct term here is saute; that is, to quickly fry in a little bit of hot fat. Pan frying uses more fat, and a lower temperature, to create a deeper crust. Probably an overkill for mussels. For a saute, you want relatively dry (pat dry with towel if necessary - frozen seafood can release a lot of water) ingredients, ...


20

To directly answer your question - you slice it for presentation. Entrecôte should be cooked at as high a temperature as you can achieve. This will tend towards charring the outside before the inside is cooked. As you should serve it towards medium rather than rare because of the fat content, you want to avoid over-cooking by doing it too slowly. You are ...


20

Technically, an egg is not "fried" unless there is at least some oil involved. So even though you could cook an egg in a very well-seasoned cast iron pan with no oil, it wouldn't technically be a fried egg. The primary reason you use oil, though, is to keep the eggs from sticking. So in a pan like yours -- a worn-out nonstick pan that's not ...


19

I'm no chemist, but a quick googling shows hydrogen peroxide [sodium percarbonate in water] to be quite aggressive on aluminium. I'd guess that some light surface scratching, which would otherwise have been quite survivable* in itself, allowed the peroxide to leech under the non-stick surface, attack the aluminium substrate & allow larger flakes to break ...


16

I'd say not more than a table spoon (around 15ml), maybe a little more if you feel your eggs are sticking; you need to experiment, but I think you should use as little as possible. Use oil (or other fat) to help crisp up the egg. Butter will work better for scrambled eggs (IMO).


16

While pouring a caustic chemical on your non-stick and scraping it with hard plastic didn't so your coating any favors it was very likely already damaged. How this damage came to be is impossible to say exactly, but here's some ways it could have happened: Overheating: non-stick coatings have become more durable but they still aren't indestructible. Non-...


15

An important element to cooking fish is the quality of the fish itself. Many fish processors use sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP) to preserve the fish. Unfortunately this also makes the fish absorb water. What you end up cooking is a "balloon" filled with water. As soon as the proteins begin shrinking, the excess water is expelled quickly which ...


15

You say In the advertisements the chefs just swirl the mussels, shrimps, and octopus pieces around and produce some tasty browned pieces That's like saying "When I watch Bob Ross, he just puts paint on the brush, then moves the brush on the canvas, and a landscape emerges. I tried it and no landscape came out." What you are missing is not ...


14

You've cut your onions too large for them to crisp up. Onions hold so much moisture that if you leave them in large pieces, the middle can only get up to steaming temperatures, while the outside edges cook more quickly and burn. As I mentioned in my answer to another question about frying onions, for instructions on making crispy onions, I recommend looking ...


13

The amount of oil required is dependant on the result you want. At minimum, you can fry an egg in a teaspoon of oil, but if you want the top basted you will need sufficient that you can splash some over the top to finish it. Otherwise you either have to fry it for longer, or risk the white still being runny. Alternatively, abandon the sunny-side-up idea &...


9

Squeeze it. This is frozen seafood. Freezing food creates tiny sharp ice crystals that break a lot of the cell walls, and releases trapped moisture. When you defrost you need to squeeze all that loose moisture out or you'll end up boiling rather than frying. So squeeze the seafood between some paper towels or with a clean dishcloth. Then wash the cloth to ...


6

Two things I note about your picture based you your stated outcome of crispy onions: The pieces are rather big. Onions have a very high moisture content, which means that the larger the pieces are the slower you have to cook them to get a uniform result (this is part of why caramelizing onions takes so long and needs to be done on low heat). Try with ...


6

One point is presentation as has already been covered by another answer. Another is to cut the muscle fibers shorter if possible. Muscle fibers are generally tough, and so if you cut them into shorter parts the meat will feel more tender to chew. A premium piece of steak will already have the fibers short, ie. along the shortest dimension like so ||||||||||||...


5

the reason you haven't found any recipes for soggy sweet potato fries is because of one simple fact: soggy is the default state for oven fries, unless you do something to specifically make the crispy. So, in search of non-crispy fries, here is a list of things you could try: Cook at a low temperature; over 400°f makes crispy fries, so closer to 350°f will ...


4

Although the accepted answer suggested around 15 ml, I would do around 5 ml (a teaspoon) for a single egg. Just make sure you don't unnecessarily coat the whole pan, and you should be good with a teaspoon. For me, pans are remarkably non-stick right after they have been used (still hot), meaning I can fry an egg with the super thin layer of oil left on the ...


4

Under what circumstances should I use oil for cooking eggs I will turn that around: the circumstance where you will not use oil is when you have a working non-stick pan (so not the worn-out one you described) and you prefer eggs made without oil. If any of these conditions is not true, you should use oil. and how much The range is huge. Upwards, it is ...


4

Three parts: Use a carbon steel wok, cast iron pan, or non-stick pan (in that order of preference) Use cooked rice that is dry with separated grains Don't use a lot of sauce You will not be able to make good fried rice without sticking in a stainless steel pan. Fun watch, which talks a lot about the requirements for fried rice: Alex French Guy's series on ...


3

To answer from a "why did they do this" point of view, as the other answers have more practical cooking advice: it is because onions basically go through a few phases in cooking in the frying pan. (Raw) -remove water-> (Translucent) -cook sugar-> (Caramelized) -cook more-> (Burnt) What happens with long onion pieces cooked over too high ...


3

When cooking mixed seafood on pan, I always heat the pan with sunflower oil (can be butter) until it's completely covered with hot oil, and then the cooking must be with high fire for a very short amount of time, you will have to taste one of them - once its edible - it's ready. Don't forget to stir all the time. It's very sensitive food.


3

You say the heat source doesn't matter, but it's probably the biggest effect. Gas tends to give a hotter ring, possibly with a central burner giving a central hotspot on big burners. Electric (resistive) depends on where it makes good contact - and both pan and ring probably aren't perfectly flat. Induction should be quite even over the element (if the pan ...


3

Preheat your pan on low to low-medium. Build your sandwich. Butter the bread or the pan. It doesn't matter. Place the sandwich in the pan. Keep the heat low, to low-medium. Wait. Check the underside, looking for a golden brown. You want the heat low, because you want the cheese to begin melting without burning the bread. Be patient. When you see ...


3

There is only one way that adding an ingredient prevents another one from burning: it brings down the temperature. Usually this is because the added ingredient has a lot of moisture in it. Boiling off water, whether that water is in liquid or inside an ingredient like onions, requires a lot of heat energy, and while the water is being boiled off, the ...


3

While FuzzyChef describes a correct mechanism, it does not apply to your video. You can stop peppercorns from burning if you drop, say, a can of tomatoes on them, but not by adding a teaspoon of ginger. You will also note that the next sentence in the video tells you to "quickly move on to stop these from burning too", the ginger clearly does not ...


2

I asked a local bar/restaurant owner how to make my breading stick to jalapenos.. because he makes really good ones. ..he soaks his jalapenos in buttermilk over night. It will make the smooth skin of the pepper wrinkle up basically, so that it gives you a kinda rough surface for the breading mixture. Someone on here said if you don't want the heat, soaking ...


2

I always do bacon in the microwave, on a plate, between paper towels. It's quick and the doneness is very controllable. Maybe try that with prosciutto bits?


2

I once got the advice to double-fry them at different temperatures: First you fry them for 5-7 minutes at 325F / ~162C Then you remove the fries from the oil, increase the oil temperature to 350F/~175F, and fry them for another 2-3 minutes until golden & crispy. It is best to soak the potatoes in cold water before frying to remove the excess starch. ...


2

I think this is a heavily westernized version of, em, Chinese "chicken balls" (鸡球 ji qiu). The more authentic version comes without the thick batter; instead it's just slightly coated with potato starch. Also, they're not served directly as a dish, but instead used as an intermediate ingredient; you can make, for example, kung pao chicken balls, ...


2

When coated in oil you don't toast them. You fry them. And toasting pine nuts usually means in oven, often tossing (also apply to doing it on stovetop but then tossing should be constant). Adding oil is pointless for few reasons: Pine nuts (or nuts in general) are already fatty on their own. Adding different oil don't make the taste better. It's just a ...


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