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17

The rule of thumb when spiking a ganache is to either reduce the cream by the same amount or add double the amount of chocolate (by weight). So for one ounce of alcohol you either leave out one ounce of cream or add another two ounces of chocolate. That said, yours is a slightly lighter ganache than the usual 1 part cream / 2 parts chocolate and a slight ...


11

If you are trying to make chocolate frosting using whipped cream, you need to: Whip the cream first. Melt the chocolate and add some amount of whipped cream to the melted chocolate (mix it by cut and fold method) Add this mixture to the remaining whipped cream and fold it. Don't over-mix it, it would knock out the air from the whipped cream. To make ...


9

It's difficult to say what exactly happened to your cream so it got lumpy, but it's quite possible that it's overbeaten. When making chocolate whipped cream you should make sure to chill the mixture thoroughly. I always let mine stay in the fridge over night. This of course only works if you mix enough cream with the chocolate, otherwise it gets too hard ...


8

Ganache is a mixture of cream and chocolate, made by heating the cream and mixing in the chocolate until smooth and fully incorporated. Butter is then often added to give the final product a characteristic "shine". Ganache can be used as a filling or as a coating/topping in truffles and is a frequent component in other desserts. I've encountered "...


5

What you're missing is solids. 17g of cream (especially when you consider the high percentage of fat in cream in relation to solids) is not going to be enough against 60g of cocoa butter. Where are you from? In the US, milk solids (in the form of dried milk powder) are cheap compared to cocoa butter. Many high quality white chocolate brands do not contain ...


5

While adding sugar syrups like corn syrup or invert syrup to ganache is fairly common, it will change the texture of the ganache. You'd end up with something more like a chocolate coating. If bitterness specifically is the problem, I'd suggest using a less bitter chocolate. Perhaps you can find something with lower cocoa solids that will have a smoother ...


5

I think you've got too much liquid in your ganache, either because the chocolate or the glucose syrup (assuming its syrup). Milk chocolate can be used in a ganache but as it has a lower proportion of cocoa you would want to use less cream in your recipe when using it. You could try whipping it as the inclusion of air should thicken it, however that will ...


5

Yes, you can try adding more cream in without hurting anything. However, when cooled it may not mix in very effectively, depending on how thick it already is. If you have trouble you just need to heat it up a bit and it will mix in no problem. Of course, heating may be a better option than adding cream in making it more workable. If you add cream it will be ...


4

I would suggest a dark, dry caramel. If you make a dark caramel and add just a tiny bit of cream or butter to it at the end, it will be firm and dry (at least, as much as ganache is) and not "sticky", as you say in your question. The trick will be adding enough butter or cream that the caramel remains pliable, but not so much that it is sticky; you may have ...


3

There is. Pouring hot milk or cream over chocolate pieces is a much gentler way of melting it. If you boil the chocolate, however, chances are good that you will overheat it. Chocolate has a low melting temperature, and a low burning temperature. Boiling your chocolate for too long (more than a few seconds) will burn it, changing the taste and texture ...


3

I have frozen ganache and used it later as a topping with no problems. Just ensure that it is warmed enough to become semi-liquid before you use it for topping your cake. As a note - it's also delicious scooped frozen from the container. Perfect with icecream.


3

Whenever I've made chocolate whipped cream I start with a cold bowl, cold mixer, and cold heavy cream and beat it until it starts to hold small peaks. Then I add 1 tablespoon of cocoa powder and 3 tablespoons of powdered(confectioner's) sugar and a teaspoon of vanilla and mix it again until evenly distributed. The sugar is necessary to balance the ...


3

Jolenealaska is right that you are missing solids: milk powder and sugar. Other powders won't give you the traditional taste and texture, and although they may turn out to be tasty, it will need lots of experimenting. Normal white chocolate is made of something like 1:1:1 cocoa butter to sugar to milk powder. If you change the ratio, you will have a ...


3

You'll definitely want to freeze the cake. Once it's frozen, use a spatula to apply a layer of ganache to the side that will be the bottom of the cake, then return it to the freezer. Once that has set, put the cake, ganache/bottom down on a cooling rack on top of a sheet of parchment paper or acetate. Slowly pour your melted ganache over the cake, guiding it ...


2

Hohos get that perfectly smooth coating all over because they are dipped. And it is far from real chocolate; it is a formulation engineered for the purpose. This would be better done with tempered coverture (which would obviously best show off the quality of the chocolate) or a sugar based chocolate glaze, rather than ganache (although a stiff ganache ...


2

I came looking for prevention - frequently happens to me too, without alcohol (in the truffles; I haven’t noticed that a glass of wine in me makes a difference). I do have a works-every-time solution, at least: mayonnaise method, per Alice Medrich: regardless of the amount of ganache you are trying to fix, bring 3-4 Tb cream to a simmer. Pour it into a ...


2

I asked a professional cake maker at the shop where I buy my cake ingredients and got told not to pour the ganache for the effect that I was trying to achieve. I got my results by following method: First, I applied the ganache as usual, following the traditional method. Then I dipped my hands in hot water and smoothed the ganache with the wet hands In ...


2

There is no reason pouring ganache wouldn't work for this. 50/50 cream to bittersweet chocolate will work just fine. Just move quickly while the ganache is warm - you shouldn't have any problem at all. here's a picture of a cake iced by pouring 50/50 ganache: 50/50 poured ganache sets firm in the sense that it stays put once it has cooled. Considering the ...


2

That may produce some sort of chocolate sauce or confection, but ganache is by definition made from cream and chocolate. Basic ganache is equal parts chocolate and cream by weight. Given that ganache is typically made with whipping cream (30% milkfat), the water being added is about 70% of the weight of the chocolate. Your product contains more water than ...


2

Yes you can, just warm everything up gently over a double boiler or in the microwave and mix thoroughly.


2

Yes you can, some Portuguese/Brazilian ganache recipes actually don't use cream at all. Cream (creme de leite) can be prepared this home-made way: 500 ml of fresh milk 1 egg yolk passed through the sieve 200 g butter 200 g hydrogenated vegetable fat (margarine) In a pan, mix the sieved yolk and the milk, heat it slow so that the yolk does not cook and the ...


2

Experimenting with the approach described by FuzzyChef, will probably be faster and more convenient than the approach suggested in this answer; this answer is mostly a record of my experiments. Caramelized White Chocolate Ganache Many if not most white chocolate varieties use deodorized cocoa butter, so most of the flavors present are from milk solids and ...


2

When your ganache is runny, it is usually a matter of proportion. Typical ratios of pure (chocolate/cream) ganaches run between 1/1 and 2/1 if you want them non-runny, and 1/1 can be quite soft. When you consider that cream has 60% liquid and 40% solids, that's a ratio of between 2.33/1 and 4/1 pure solids to pure liquids. Your combination, if we don't ...


1

You can put the chocolate into the pan with the milk, but it's a bit more tricky than if you pour the milk onto the chocolate. I know if I pour X amount of milk at Y temperature onto some chocolate it will add Z amount of heat to that chocolate. On the other hand if I put the chocolate into the pan with the milk then the milk and the pan will add heat to ...


1

A line of approach: You could prove it by finding the actual water content of the Ganache vs. the sugar content. The cream is cooked down somewhat similar to what happens when you do Dulce de Leche; and is turned to syrup. High sugar products (candies, candied fruits) are relatively stable at room temperature (between 15c and 22c, according to wikipedia) ...


1

There are recipes out there that call for a mixer, but they must be executed carefully. I used one myself for a ganache-like frosting that needs really a lot of stirring, almost impossible by hand. I tried by hand first, because I didn't trust the blender bit in the recipe, but used it in the end. (Turned out beautifully - and that was for my own wedding ...


1

If you're trying to salvage it, I think about all you can do is heat it until it's well melted and let it settle, stirring gently now and then. Hopefully the air bubbles will eventually all come out. I suspect it won't be perfect, and may take a while. And in the future, just don't use a mixer. Everything should melt and meld just fine with gentle heat and ...


1

If you are allowed to take the cake you can do the following: 1) Ganache the cake after you reach India, preferably indoors as it will melt as you take it along the road. 2) To take the cake along with you during the time of your flight just put it in a ziploc bag and seal it well and it should remain intact and not go bad after you arrive, However, make ...


1

I can understand why you'd like to do this, however I would steer you clear of it. A roulade is very light, and if you coated it with a ganache you'd overpower it completely. Try drizzling a cherry, mint, or chocolate sauce over a slice in a fancy way instead, it will look and taste amazing.


1

The way I've rescued a ganache is to use an immersion blender to pummel the mixture... it's amazing how it can turn a grainy, oily mixture into a perfectly smooth, shiny ganache. Always give this a go before throwing away a mixture.


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