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11

If you are trying to make chocolate frosting using whipped cream, you need to: Whip the cream first. Melt the chocolate and add some amount of whipped cream to the melted chocolate (mix it by cut and fold method) Add this mixture to the remaining whipped cream and fold it. Don't over-mix it, it would knock out the air from the whipped cream. To make ...


9

It's difficult to say what exactly happened to your cream so it got lumpy, but it's quite possible that it's overbeaten. When making chocolate whipped cream you should make sure to chill the mixture thoroughly. I always let mine stay in the fridge over night. This of course only works if you mix enough cream with the chocolate, otherwise it gets too hard ...


8

Ganache is a mixture of cream and chocolate, made by heating the cream and mixing in the chocolate until smooth and fully incorporated. Butter is then often added to give the final product a characteristic "shine". Ganache can be used as a filling or as a coating/topping in truffles and is a frequent component in other desserts. I've encountered "...


7

White chocolate does not have starch, so it does not thicken the ganache, unlike dark chocolate. The proper proportion for white chocolate ganache is 45 to 60 ml of cream to 12 ounces of chocolate. You used 240 ml, which made it too runny. Use less cream and you will get a good consistency.


6

In addition to using too much cream, part of the problem is also that you're using chocolate chips for any purpose other than... chips. Chocolate chips are specifically made to be somewhat heat-resistant and have less cocoa butter than quality couverture or even compound or baker's chocolate, which means that any melted-chocolate product (including ganache) ...


5

I found an answer in McGee's 'On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen'. The basic ganache is 1:1 chocolate:cream (by weight). With lots of chocolate the emulsion can come apart. In 'Keys to good cooking' McGee describes how to restore a failed ganache. You put it over a double boiler and when it reaches 33ºC y stir it vigorously. If that ...


5

I think you've got too much liquid in your ganache, either because the chocolate or the glucose syrup (assuming its syrup). Milk chocolate can be used in a ganache but as it has a lower proportion of cocoa you would want to use less cream in your recipe when using it. You could try whipping it as the inclusion of air should thicken it, however that will ...


5

While adding sugar syrups like corn syrup or invert syrup to ganache is fairly common, it will change the texture of the ganache. You'd end up with something more like a chocolate coating. If bitterness specifically is the problem, I'd suggest using a less bitter chocolate. Perhaps you can find something with lower cocoa solids that will have a smoother ...


4

What you're missing is solids. 17g of cream (especially when you consider the high percentage of fat in cream in relation to solids) is not going to be enough against 60g of cocoa butter. Where are you from? In the US, milk solids (in the form of dried milk powder) are cheap compared to cocoa butter. Many high quality white chocolate brands do not contain ...


4

I think what you really are asking is what fats can be substituted for some of the cocoabutter that would give a lighter flavour or a flavour more suited to vanilla. Perhaps a blend of: coconut (high quality raw) palm (highly processed and bland) hydrogenated oils such as sunflower, rapeseed, soy (produced for confectionery manufacture) Liquid oils such ...


4

Use a soy and vegetable-fat based white chocolate like Oppenheimer Kosher white chocolate chips. They are quite sweet, but lag behind on the chocolate-y taste. They temper well and behave in most ways I've used them like regular chocolate chips, except that for white chocolate taste they are a bit bland. These would make a good vehicle for a lighter but ...


3

You'll definitely want to freeze the cake. Once it's frozen, use a spatula to apply a layer of ganache to the side that will be the bottom of the cake, then return it to the freezer. Once that has set, put the cake, ganache/bottom down on a cooling rack on top of a sheet of parchment paper or acetate. Slowly pour your melted ganache over the cake, guiding it ...


3

A 1:1 ratio is probably a cake frosting ratio, not a truffle ratio (although it could be for molded or even piped truffles). If you're hand rolling your truffles, though, a 1:1 ratio is going to be difficult to work with. A couple of ideas: You say you're keeping the temperature under 120 degrees, but 120 is very hot for ganache. You might want to try the ...


3

Disclaimer: I've never tried to make a ganache with olive oil, so take that into consideration as you read the following. First, I have to assume that you're trying to use olive oil to replace the cream that's normally used in making ganache, perhaps to make a non-dairy ganache. If that's not right, please clarify your question. Ganache is essentially an ...


3

There is. Pouring hot milk or cream over chocolate pieces is a much gentler way of melting it. If you boil the chocolate, however, chances are good that you will overheat it. Chocolate has a low melting temperature, and a low burning temperature. Boiling your chocolate for too long (more than a few seconds) will burn it, changing the taste and texture ...


3

I would suggest a dark, dry caramel. If you make a dark caramel and add just a tiny bit of cream or butter to it at the end, it will be firm and dry (at least, as much as ganache is) and not "sticky", as you say in your question. The trick will be adding enough butter or cream that the caramel remains pliable, but not so much that it is sticky; you may have ...


3

Whenever I've made chocolate whipped cream I start with a cold bowl, cold mixer, and cold heavy cream and beat it until it starts to hold small peaks. Then I add 1 tablespoon of cocoa powder and 3 tablespoons of powdered(confectioner's) sugar and a teaspoon of vanilla and mix it again until evenly distributed. The sugar is necessary to balance the ...


3

I have frozen ganache and used it later as a topping with no problems. Just ensure that it is warmed enough to become semi-liquid before you use it for topping your cake. As a note - it's also delicious scooped frozen from the container. Perfect with icecream.


2

I have tried this olive oil ganache, it works well and it is very stable. Recipe: Ingredients: 350g white chocolate (I used the Valrhona), 150g cream, 225g olive oil, a vanilla bean. Preparation: Heat the cream with the vanilla bean slowly (divide the vanilla bean in two, and take all the vanilla inside it). As it starts boiling, take it off ...


2

Pierre Herme lists a recipe for this in his book Macarons. He just makes a white chocolate ganache with cream, and then blends in olive oil with a hand blender. The amounts suggest he is replacing much of the cream with oil (350g white chocolate, 150g cream, 225g olive oil). I've heard the flavor is amazing, but haven't made them myself.


2

Hohos get that perfectly smooth coating all over because they are dipped. And it is far from real chocolate; it is a formulation engineered for the purpose. This would be better done with tempered coverture (which would obviously best show off the quality of the chocolate) or a sugar based chocolate glaze, rather than ganache (although a stiff ganache ...


2

For a white chocolate ganache but with a vanilla taste, I would suggest tempering with chocolate itself. You must lower the chocolate taste but raise the vanilla taste,. I suggest melting white chocolate and mixing it with some shortening, then I suggest folding it in with marshmallow fluff and using vanilla emulsion. I would rather use emulsion than than ...


2

I asked a professional cake maker at the shop where I buy my cake ingredients and got told not to pour the ganache for the effect that I was trying to achieve. I got my results by following method: First, I applied the ganache as usual, following the traditional method. Then I dipped my hands in hot water and smoothed the ganache with the wet hands In ...


2

There is no reason pouring ganache wouldn't work for this. 50/50 cream to bittersweet chocolate will work just fine. Just move quickly while the ganache is warm - you shouldn't have any problem at all. here's a picture of a cake iced by pouring 50/50 ganache: 50/50 poured ganache sets firm in the sense that it stays put once it has cooled. Considering the ...


2

Jolenealaska is right that you are missing solids: milk powder and sugar. Other powders won't give you the traditional taste and texture, and although they may turn out to be tasty, it will need lots of experimenting. Normal white chocolate is made of something like 1:1:1 cocoa butter to sugar to milk powder. If you change the ratio, you will have a ...


2

That may produce some sort of chocolate sauce or confection, but ganache is by definition made from cream and chocolate. Basic ganache is equal parts chocolate and cream by weight. Given that ganache is typically made with whipping cream (30% milkfat), the water being added is about 70% of the weight of the chocolate. Your product contains more water than ...


2

When your ganache is runny, it is usually a matter of proportion. Typical ratios of pure (chocolate/cream) ganaches run between 1/1 and 2/1 if you want them non-runny, and 1/1 can be quite soft. When you consider that cream has 60% liquid and 40% solids, that's a ratio of between 2.33/1 and 4/1 pure solids to pure liquids. Your combination, if we don't ...


1

A line of approach: You could prove it by finding the actual water content of the Ganache vs. the sugar content. The cream is cooked down somewhat similar to what happens when you do Dulce de Leche; and is turned to syrup. High sugar products (candies, candied fruits) are relatively stable at room temperature (between 15c and 22c, according to wikipedia) ...


1

There are recipes out there that call for a mixer, but they must be executed carefully. I used one myself for a ganache-like frosting that needs really a lot of stirring, almost impossible by hand. I tried by hand first, because I didn't trust the blender bit in the recipe, but used it in the end. (Turned out beautifully - and that was for my own wedding ...


1

If you're trying to salvage it, I think about all you can do is heat it until it's well melted and let it settle, stirring gently now and then. Hopefully the air bubbles will eventually all come out. I suspect it won't be perfect, and may take a while. And in the future, just don't use a mixer. Everything should melt and meld just fine with gentle heat and ...


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