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105

Bolognese is (to Italians) a specific dish with a precise ingredient list. You wouldn't put garlic in a chocolate cake, but that's because it probably wouldn't taste nice. Imagine a chocolate cake to which you added coffee. Some people might enjoy the cake, some might not, but assuming it was a cake and had plenty of cocoa and/or chocolate, nobody would say ...


68

As a health inspector for over 20 years, I am astounded by the lack of awareness that food safety controls are based on science and not on individual inspectors' personal fears and bad moods. Botulism control is based on some of the following facts: botulinum spores are commonly found in soil and on vegetable surfaces, botulinum grows in low or no oxygen ...


58

Each "wedge" is a clove. The entire garlic is called a "head".


42

Clearly, your flatmate was misinformed. Firstly, Italian cuisine is defined regionally. There are vast differences throughout the country, usually defined by local ingredients and historical influences. However, there are many Italian dishes...from north to south that contain both onion and garlic. It could be true that someone's specific recipe for, ...


42

The general category for vegetables/herbs (that are not leafy green herbs, or spices) added to a dish for flavor (rather than bulk/texture/nutrition) is "aromatics", and that describes what they are there for: Add some basic aroma to complete the flavor profile. Typically added early and sauteed or sweated with some kind of culinary fat present to bind the ...


34

I smash it first to loosen up the papery skin, which makes it much easier to peel.


34

My 2 centesimi (italian for cents) from a very much biased perspective, i.e. trying to push my subjective point of view with supposedly objective criteria. Sugo alla Bolognese, or ragù alla Bolognese is a sauce which is traditionally eaten with tagliatelle or, more generally, egg-based fresh pasta. It is supposed to have a 'rounded' and somewhat sweet taste,...


33

Garlic strength is mainly down to how much you cook the garlic, and how finely you chop it (different varieties of garlic notwithstanding). Simply put, the less you cook it and the finer you chop it, the more bite it will have. So you can alter those variables to achieve the effect you want. If you want super punchy garlic, chop it finely and use it raw. ...


28

Traditionally (at least in Spain) garlic was kept in a braided string, hung in a dry place, so that they could last until the following season. Separating them in cloves will cause them to dry prematurely.


21

Those are garlic roots, no reason to worry. If you plan to use these cloves, note that they are about to leave the dormant stage and start to sprout, so make sure you remove the green sprout in the middle of the clove. It is rather likely to have turned bitter now. I found this video on youtube, which shows the roots forming on a garlic clove; in a rather ...


21

Not really an answer to your question, but a possible alternative - why not frozen garlic? I use a lot of fresh, but there are 2 different sorts of frozen I use too - one is Indian in origin & comes as a bag of 'cubes' of frozen paste. It loses some of the punch of fresh, but you can simply add more if required. UK pricing maybe £1.10 for 500g. The ...


20

Well, it depends on the size of the clove. A heaped teaspoon will probably be about equivalent to two cloves of garlic, but it's cooking, not particle physics. Remember you can always add an ingredient, but you can't take it away - so taste your food and adjust as necessary.


20

I think that might be elephant garlic, which isn't really garlic at all. It's in the same family, but is actually a kind of leek so it has a flavor that's a cross between garlic and onion, but milder than garlic. Because it's not very strong you'll probably want to add the whole thing. Just chop it and use it as normal.


18

That is actually quite controversial in its own way. If you are going to use a garlic press, you should cut the root end off the clove (you can do that a bulb at a time if desired) and give the individual cloves a bit of a crush with the side of a big knife before you press them. If you do that and you have a good garlic press, you can then just pluck the ...


17

You don't have to peel garlic before using a garlic press, but doing so lets you press more garlic before you have to clean out the skins and so forth. If you only need to press a clove or two, there is not a lot of reason to peel first, since you will just have to clean the press out once.


16

When crushed or chopped, garlic releases mercaptins from within its cells (sulfur containing compounds). Sulfur readily forms bonds with other amino acids, notably cystine which itself contains a sulfur atom in its chemical structure. When two sulfhydryl groups (S-H) come into close proximity, a disulfide bridge can be formed, creating a relatively strong ...


16

Garlic will spoil faster in the fridge actually. I don't know how long it will last in the fridge, but I understand that it lasts longer if you leave it in a cool, dark, dry storage. I believe one reason is that your fridge is generally too humid. In my experience, garlic kept in the fridge is also more likely to develop mould (goes soft, and dark ...


14

I agree that fermentation from bacteria is the most likely explanation. So, to tackle your questions point by point: It is unsafe, as the other posts already mentioned, due to botulism danger. Plant matter without access to oxygen is not shelf stable, unless it has been pickled with sufficient acid. There will be some chemistry going on between garlic and ...


14

There are two different issues, which have separate drivers. There are no specific rules, just consequences of the thaw and freezing cycles on each food--but it is always better to minimize the number of cycles to maintain quality. Safety From a safety point of view, the rule is any perishable food (one that is not fairly stable at room temperature such ...


14

Your garlic was moldy within it's peel, then dried out, leaving you with a "garlic mummy". This happens occasionally, sometimes with a single clove, sometimes with the entire head. According to the OSU Plant Clinic, there are different types of mold commmon on garlic, but most seem to be visible from the outside. In your case, the infamous Aspergillus ...


13

I make garlic paste quite often, using this technique I saw on Bobby Flay. Put the whole clove on the board. Lay knife flat, and smack it with your hand. Remove paper and root. Dice finely. Sprinkle with the quantity of salt your recipe calls for. With the knife relatively flat, grind the garlic into the salt with the knife. Typically, I'll make a pass in ...


13

I agree with moscafj's general answer: there is no pan-Italian "rule" like this in Italian cuisine. It's common to mix the two in many Italian regions, and it's certainly common in other world cuisines. On the other hand, I wouldn't dismiss this story out-of-hand or as some quirk of one crazy roommate. I grew up near an old Italian neighbor, daughter of ...


12

According to research conducted at the University of Idaho and published in 2014 in the journal Food Protection Trends, there are now consumer guidelines to process garlic (and certain herbs) safely through acidification before adding to oil. I would read the first link thoroughly to understand the necessary process. To ensure safety, follow the steps ...


12

It's not so much the taste as the texture. If they haven't been sauted first, the onions stay relatively crunchy during the rest of the cooking. The same is true of the garlic, but you'd usually have cut the garlic into much smaller pieces so it doesn't take as long to soften up, hence kicking the onion off first and adding the garlic a bit later.


12

Ditch the cream and onions, and don't use tomato paste. Take a whole bulb of garlic, peel the cloves and leave them whole. Heat a cup of good olive oil over medium heat and add the garlic, stirring occasionally until very lightly brown and blistered: be careful not to burn it! Then add 4 28oz cans of chopped/crushed Italian tomatoes and some chilli, being ...


12

There are three factors to consider in deciding whether to chop or mince garlic versus using a garlic press: Texture. If you want a sauce or dressing to be completely smooth, the texture of pressed garlic is suitable as it is essentially pureed. Flavor. As a general rule of thumb, within limits, the more finely you chop garlic, the more strongly its ...


12

You have a few options, as you're dealing with high-heat cooking Only fry the garlic for a few seconds before adding something else to cool down the pan. You don't want it to cook 'til it shows color ... just a few seconds then toss in some onion or other high-moisture items. Add the garlic with something else (eg, ginger), to keep it from burning quite as ...


12

There is bottled minced Garlic and freeze-dried minced Garlic. 1 medium-size clove Garlic equals 1 to 1 1/2 teaspoons bottled minced garlic, this is around 5 g / .18 oz. So for 2 cloves you should add 2-3 teaspoons. You need about 50% less for freeze-dried minced Garlic.


12

Aliums (the garlic and onion family) can be a trigger of both allergies and food intolerance. Unfortunately, they're two of the most common flavorings in foods. There's already a question on here about removing aliums: Replacement for alliums? Tomatoes, are a separate problem, but it's not particularly prevalent in Asian cooking, other than on the Indian ...


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