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52

Cured meat should not be emitting methane- or any other flammable gas. That would be an indicator of advanced spoilage and you would notice the smell. A more likely culprit, in my opinion, would be fat. Fat burns well, of course, and sausage is full of it. Tiny splatters of fat can become aerosolized and travel a good distance where they would ignite on ...


19

Summary: Baking soda is mostly used to soften the beans faster and decrease cooking time by increasing pH. In some scenarios, it has been shown to aid in breaking down gas-causing sugars as well. Higher concentrations of baking soda and/or pressure cooking may be needed to make this latter effect significant. In most cases, an increased soaking time will ...


16

The simple answer is: no, heat is heat, it should taste the same. Reality is slightly more complicated than that. In reality, a cook learns how to cook well by instinct with his stove. When he changes to a stove with a different behavior, his instinct is suddenly wrong, but he probably does not know it. So he cooks as usual. But because the stove works ...


16

It is not a property of the stove (or the markings on it). Words like "medium heat" actually refer to the speed at which your food is cooking, and there are a lot of factors which contribute to that. Beyond the energy output of your burners, there is the type of stove (electric, gas, induction), the thermodynamic properties of your pan, the relation of pan ...


12

The actual action of soaking is what does most of the work. Most legumes have complex oligosaccharides, a type of complex sugar. Digestion of this complex sugar is what causes flatulence. By soaking your beans will help remove some of this excess sugar. Be sure you discard the soaking water. Though it is often said that adding baking soda helps I've yet ...


12

It's spitting hot fat - still a liquid rather than a gas. This then touches the element and ignites. Sometimes more ignites than other times. You get the same effect when frying, even without added fat. I've had flames up to face height from frying sausages on a rather fierce camping stove.


11

This is an issue I've had to come to terms with myself. I spent most of my catering life spoilt by having a massive fan assisted electric ovens with space for 24 trays at once. Then one day I left it all behind to work in a tiny 2 chef kitchen where all we had was a bottom heated gas oven. The first 6 months was a nightmare. It's still not easy even to this ...


10

CO2 is carbon dioxide and N2 is Nitrogen gas. In either case, this is referred to as "Modified atmosphere packaging", which means the food is packaged in something other than simply "air". The point of doing this is that it increases the shelf life of the product. From the website of a company who sells machines that do this: When ...


8

This is completely normal and expected. Indian pickle is fermented. One of the by products of that fermentation is gas. The salt keeps undesirable bacteria from growing. In the future you should use a container that can be less tightly closed and allow some of the gas to vent as it ferments. You wouldn't want a bottle to burst.


8

No. Tried it today melting some butter on a low heat and it exploded violently sending glass shards in a 1 metre radius. Suprised me as I remembered using Pyrex test tubes over a Bunsen burner in science class. Won't be trying that again. Epic fail!


8

Many ovens in the US have such a feature. However, ovens lie. Even if thermostats and thermocouples in ovens were scientifically accurate (they are not), they are positioned on the outside walls of the oven, not the center of the oven where you are actually doing the cooking. This might not be an issue if you are baking a frozen pizza (if this is the ...


7

In addition to what rheone said, I have noticed that using baking soda kind of softens food. A characteristica example of this is Use baking soda in green vegetables to keep them green after cooking is done which isn't the best solution because just a minute is enough to miss it and eat a soup instead of green vegetables. I have also noticed that if ...


7

Fortunately, temperatures don't usually need to be as precise in stovetop cooking as in baking. When you do need precise temperatures, you can stick a thermometer in the pan. This can be useful for tempering chocolate, scalding milk, deep frying, candy making, etc. The real problem with stovetop heat settings is that the knob on your stove only controls ...


6

The US Fire Administration clearly recommends not leaving cooking appliances unattended when no one is home: Based on 2006-2010 annual averages: Unattended cooking was by far the leading contributing factor in home cooking fires. [...] Ranges accounted for the largest share (58%) of home cooking fire incidents. Ovens accounted for 16%. At the time this ...


6

For reliable baking you need to know what your oven is doing. If the internal temperature fluctuates wildly, you're dead in the water: replace it. If it's fairly stable, spend some time learning it. Get a decent oven thermometer; set the oven's temperature control to, say, 350 degrees (F) and let it settle; check what the oven thermometer says. Then work ...


6

The jets can be unscrewed, using a properly sized wrench, and cleaned with an appropriately sized cleaner. Once clean they can screwed back in. They are typically made from brass and are soft. Using the wrong wrench can round off the hex head. More importantly the orifice in the jet can be unintentionally enlarged or damaged easily. Inserting anything from ...


5

No no no. I cooked a whole meal and had to throw it away because my casserole dish exploded! I was heating hot pan drippings to make a gravy on my stove top and after 5 minutes on low-med flame it exploded and glass (chunks and very fine pieces) flew 2 rooms away! Thank god no no one was hurt.


5

Depends on what you mean by "cost effective", and what expectations you have of cooking evenness. A solid fuel stove will probably be cheapest (grandma style wood or coal oven), followed by a resistive electric stove and the most expensive stove being induction electric. This covers the initial cost of the stove itself. The quality of heating goes along ...


5

Yes, preheating warns up the entire interior of the oven which is important for keeping the air hot such as when you open the door. It helps the oven bounce back to full heat much sooner. If you don't preheat, it will take several minutes before the oven reaches proper cooking temps, and interfere with even heating. If you want to see the difference most ...


5

I've done a lot a single ring camping cooking. My camper van has a bit more kitchen than yours but I still take a similar approach when staying in it and going to work. Here's a typical example that worked for me. I cooked a curry at home and put a portion in the fridge (freezing is also an option). When camping I boiled water and put it in a vacuum flask. ...


4

DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME, unless you are prepared to put out a big fire. I have tried this at home and it does work. I love to cook in a wok, but traditional stoves don't make this easy. Traditional western stoves are made to cook with traditional flat bottomed pans, not round bottomed woks. So to make wok cooking more enjoyable I have modified my outdoor, ...


4

It would most likely be unsafe, but, most stoves do have a small brass nozzle which limits the flow of gas at the point before it mixes with air, under the the aluminum disk which has the multiple holes where the gas/air mixture comes out. If you are not adverse to the risk, and you are careful enough to make a very slight change when you increase the hole ...


4

1) I do not think so, the technique was described in e.g. modernist cuisine, they suggest using a ISI siphone and if I can remember correctly does not describe any other tool. Any pressure chamber would work, if you have access to one :-) 2) I have something like this which can be charged with both soda and cream charges, that is what I woudl suggest. (mine ...


4

Update based on edited question: there are no issues of toxicity. It is a very poor idea to use glass cookware on a burner. Not all Pyrex is made from high quality borosilicate glass anymore, and even if you have some, the issue is thermal shock, not toxicity. If you heat or cool glass very rapidly, the internal stress caused by thermal expansion (or ...


4

It's possible that it's designed to conduct less heat from the bottom. Many gas ovens have the flue in the bottom and the heating is only from below in the oven. To make things more even, most electric ovens have an element at the top and one on the bottom. Speaking of bottom, the bottom line is that you should be ok. If you find the bottom of you cake ...


4

In terms of typical baked goods, radiant heat is radiant heat. Different ovens are not going to provide you with different heat. However...a couple of things to consider: Most consumer ovens are fairly inaccurate in terms of actual temperature vs. temp. on the dial. Get an oven thermometer and keep it in your oven so that you know how "off" yours is, ...


4

I assume you are talking about the risk that the alcohol vapor from the wine mixes with the air and ignites. Let's do some maths. I'll do my calculations with some pretty round numbers, but in the end you'll see that it doesn't matter. Assume an average gas oven with a volume of 150l. According to Wikipedia, the absolute minimum mix of ethanol to air for ...


4

I've cooked plenty of crispy bacon in plenty of ovens— gas and electric, commercial and home, with and without convection— and I really doubt the browning of bacon could be noticeably retarded by trace amounts of moisture from the gas. A common trick to getting crispier bacon involves generously sprinkling water on the tray before cooking so it will render ...


4

An issue you'll have to deal with is diameter. A high flame on a smaller ring may put out more or less heat than a low flame on a bigger ring. While you might think the pan size would cancel that out, a big pan may need to go on a small ring for a gentle simmer. The height between the burner and the pan rest isn't exactly standardised either. You might do ...


4

Judging stovetop heat is difficult which is why many just learn the stove tops they uses. I believe your asking about the heat output, in BTUs, of a burner. As electric stoves usually have a slower response, as the "coils" heat up or cool down I assume the coils are at their final temperature. I'm not sure on heat response on newer electric burners (...


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