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27

Certain enzymes (proteases) cut the protein bonds that create the mesh that causes the jelly (or Jello, or gelatin) to, well, gel. Orange, watermelon and plum do not contain enough of those enzymes to interfere with gelling. In addition to paw paw (more commonly known as papaya in the US), pineapple and kiwi; mango, ginger, figs and guava also contain ...


23

What you are looking for is spherification. You need to use a different hydrocoloid than gelatin. There are a couple of techniques you can use. If you want solid spheres, you can mix your liquid with agar agar, which is readily available in the asain section of the grocery store, bring it to a simmer, and then use an eye dropper to drop the liquid in to a ...


15

As the instructions on the box say, you shouldn't put fresh pineapple (or kiwi-fruit) in the Jell-O. Apparently pineapple has an enzyme called bromelain that breaks up the gelatin into its component amino acids. You can use canned pineapple instead as the pineapple is cooked during the canning process and this denatures the bromelain.


12

Gelatin sheets are soaked in cold-to-room-temp water in order to soften and rehydrate them slightly before stirring them into the (often hot) food. If you were to try to stir a sheet of gelatin directly into hot liquid, you'd find that it behaves a lot like cornstarch. It clumps up immediately and produces unpleasant-to-eat chunks that only a blender and a ...


10

According to Modernist Pantry and thanks to SAJ14SAJ: You can successfully substitute sheet gelatin for powdered gelatin in any recipe by using the following scaling. 1 (0.25 oz.) envelope granulated gelatin = 1 tablespoon [(15 ml)] powdered gelatin = 3 sheets leaf gelatin. and so one sheet of leaf gelatin would correspond to ~1 teaspoon (5 ml) ...


10

I'm totally retracting everything I said in comments. Doing this with just Jello (no unflavored gelatin) works just fine. The key is A LOT of Jello. After reading your question I researched the question of "How much gelatin is in a box of Jello?" The only answer I was able to find was that a 4-serving box of Jello contains as much gelatin as a .25oz packet ...


9

If you want to make real Turkish delight, use cornstarch and only cornstarch. Nowhere on the Balkan have I seen a gelatine-thickened Turkish delight. No Turkish person will recognize a gelatine-thickened candy as lokum. I would go as far as to insist that aromatzied sugar syrup+gelatine = gummi bear, while aromatized sugar syrup+cornstarch = Turkish delight, ...


9

What you need for the conversion of collagen is a certain amount of energy. It is a complicated process - the melting point is around 70°C for the type of collagen contained in beef, but the melting does not happen instantly once the meat reaches 70°C. In a pressure cooking, you can apply the same amount of energy in a shorter amount of time. This is not bad,...


9

If you add too much water your jello (jelly in some parts of the world) will not solidify. What I would suggest is looking for a non-sweetened gelatin mix and adding less sugar to it. Alternatively you could get gelatin sheets or powder and make your own from scratch. It's not that hard to do and you get exactly what you want.


9

Gelatin is quite tolerant, but with a few restrictions: Never boil gelatine, because it looses it's binding/gelling properties. Liquifying gelatine requires temperatures that feel "warm" to the touch, but not all recipes handle warm additions well - e.g. whipped cream. Cooling liquid gelatine for heat sensitive recipes should happen fairly quick, and so ...


8

I have been a baker for over 30 years and made many pork pies in that time,the above answers stating that the jelly acts as a preservative and stops the meat drying out are correct, but also the jelly when added at the correct time, roughly 20 minutes half an hour after baking, absorb the pork juices that would otherwise soak into the pastry which would make ...


8

Anything that doesn't survive the 150° C oven is not going to survive a 1500° C blow torch. Gelatin has a melting point of about 35° C, maximum. It is a thermoreversible reaction, unlike the coagulation of eggs, which is thermoirreversible. Eggs set well in an oven, which is why they are used in so many baking recipes; gelatin does not, which is why it is ...


8

Yes! I was able to make a panna cotta using this product in a standard recipe with some minor changes. Just incorporate the Jell Dessert powder where the gelatin is called for and subtract 1/4-cup from the prescribed sugar. I started with this recipe on JoyofBaking.com. The recipe, like most I've seen, calls for one standard 1/4-ounce packet of gelatin. ...


8

From The naked scientist Why does it happen? Jelly is made up of long thin protein molecules. The reason that jelly sets is that as the gelatin molecules tangle up as they cool creating a huge intertwined tangle which traps the water and makes a flexible solid. The pineapple contains an enzyme called bromelain and kiwi fruit another enzyme ...


7

Enzymes which degrade proteins, called proteases, are found in many fruits. There is no simple test for it other than holding some in your mouth and seeing if it "eats" your flesh away after a few minutes Commercial test are not practical or portable as they require maceration, heating, centrifuging and using florescent dye markers. Or just make some in ...


6

As Chris says, its to do with the setting time of the gelatine vs the bubbly. Ensure all of your containers are chilled (maybe even frozen? - I put mine in 3/4 hours before making the actual dish) before you add the (chilled) champagne and get it into the bottom of the fridge as quick as you can. I suspect though cannot prove also that a smaller container (...


6

A gel is any liquid (usually) or gaseous medium suspended in a solid three-dimensional mesh which entraps the medium so that it does not flow. By way of (somewhat flawed analogy) think of a giant role of bubble wrap. Its mostly air. But the plastic keeps the air from flowing at a large scale. Gels can range from very soft to very hard. New modern aero-...


6

I've used konnyaku it's a japanese gel-type dessert you make from powder. it's crystal clear. it looks like solid water. it's rubbery as directed, but you might use more water or less powder to get the texture you want. here's a photo of what it looks like, but they've got fruit (?) in the gel that makes it look colors. http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/...


6

After many, many tests, I have discovered a few things: Heating the gelatin for a long time is very necessary. I found 180°F (82°C) for 30 min would make sure that the gelatin was properly disolved, so that it would minimize the murkiness. (30 min was my minumum test, it might've been possible with less time) You need to pour the gelatin while it's quite ...


6

You might also want to use a higher quality gelatin, like the one used for gelatin art. See this one: https://gelatinartmarket.com/products/gelatin-powder-280?variant=1455952961


6

Pineapple, kiwi and paw paw all contain enzymes that break down proteins (bromelain, actinidin and papain respectively). Since the setting agent in jelly is gelatin, which is mostly protein, using any of these fruits will interfere with the jelly setting.


5

It really has to do with the amount of time between the addition of the champagne, and when the gelatine sets, thus capturing a bubble. Champagne releases gas fairly quickly, and gelatine sets slowly. I would probably do the main preparation with a comparable white wine, and refrigerate it until nearly set, and then add the soda water for sparkle.


5

In the years since this question was originally asked I've run across two references to using gelatin in sauces: Serious Eats' Food Lab featured an article talking about adding gelatin to store-bought stock to make it more similar to restaurant stock: http://www.seriouseats.com/2015/04/the-food-lab-why-chicken-pan-sauce-better-at-restaurants-make-at-home....


5

Another solution - knock on a neighbours door and put the jelly in their fridge to set. Of course it depends on how well you know your neighbours. If you don't know your neighbours, this could be a useful way of breaking the ice - like the clichéd, "asking for a cup of sugar."


5

I'd place a tray in my sink a slowly run water through it, then sit the jelly on top of the tray, such that the bottom half of the jelly mould is under water. The constant, gentle, flow of cold water will cool the jelly quickly.


5

There is a modified form of tapioca that gives a clear solution, but it is not easily available and I do not think it would help in this case. The obvious way to firm up Jello is to use less water than recommended - use somewhere between a half and three quarters of the amount specified on the packet. But you are comparing agar with gelatin here, it is ...


5

I've heard that you can extract oils from leafy greens and once concentrated will provide a reddish tint/glow under a black light. The problem is it may not be any more palatable over gelatin. Your best bet may be to go with mint, but I'm sure most aromatic herbs would work. Start by blanching a couple of handfuls your chosen greens for a few minutes ...


5

This, I confess, is just a guess—I'd suggest adding some pectin. Pectin is a thickener that occurs naturally in fruit, but its likely absent entirely in the fruit juice you've been using. However, it's probably present in the fruit purée used in the commercial products. Pectin is, for example, the primary (if not only) jelling agent in jam, jelly, and ...


5

The packs typically contain the equivalent of 15mL of gelatine and are in powder form. Each pack is measured to set 500mL or two cups of liquid. As far as weight, it feels like about 6-7 grams of gelatin. The dominant brand seems to be knox. As for the bloom, I'm not really sure as I haven't seen it published on the label. However, I have actually ...


5

You can use Lorann flavors, they don't affect the clarity of gelatin: Found them here: https://gelatinartmarket.com/products/assorted-gelatin-art-flavoring-lorann-oils?variant=14121096455


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