8

There are a number of different ways in which gelling agents are classified. Off the top of my head: Viscosity (firmness/thickness) of solution and gel forms Thermoreversible/irreversible (does it "melt"?) Hysteresis (water loss) Hydration, melting, and setting points Appearance (in particular transparency) Sensitivity to heat, cold, alcohol, and pH ...


8

Yes! I was able to make a panna cotta using this product in a standard recipe with some minor changes. Just incorporate the Jell Dessert powder where the gelatin is called for and subtract 1/4-cup from the prescribed sugar. I started with this recipe on JoyofBaking.com. The recipe, like most I've seen, calls for one standard 1/4-ounce packet of gelatin. ...


7

An agar gel sets as it cools, like almost every other thermoreversible gel - including those made from gelatin, carrageenan, and various types of gellan and pectin. One of the properties of almost any gel is that the gelling agent needs to be dispersed and then dissolved in the solution, otherwise you'd never be able to mix it - you'd just instantly get a ...


6

A gel is any liquid (usually) or gaseous medium suspended in a solid three-dimensional mesh which entraps the medium so that it does not flow. By way of (somewhat flawed analogy) think of a giant role of bubble wrap. Its mostly air. But the plastic keeps the air from flowing at a large scale. Gels can range from very soft to very hard. New modern aero-...


5

Blueberries, and especially underripe blueberries, have a lot of pectin. Blueberries have about .4g per 100g compared to apples which have .5g. As you suspected this is almost definitely causing the problem. Many blueberry jam recipes consist of just heating pureed blueberries with sugar and acid- no added pectin needed. When you heated your pureed ...


5

To summarize the points of Aaronut's answer and provide a framework for answering: 'Gluten is responsible for elasticity of dough, which is perceived as chewiness','The "rising" in baked goods is essentially just stretching of the gluten network', 'Gluten is also exceptionally good at both absorbing and retaining moisture' Dough's rising is catalyzed ...


5

Try using mallow root. It is where the confection got its name, and is the very ingredient that has been superseded by gelatin.


4

I doubt very much that you'll be able to substitute any amount of arrowroot for carrageenan. Arrowroot can substitute for other starches, but carrageenan is a gum. If you want to be able to melt the cheese easily, gelatin is your best bet, and you should be able make a 1:1 substitution (although the process is obviously different - you need to bloom it ...


4

The difference between activating them is important if you want to use gelatin instead of agar. Gelatin is made of proteins and peptides and agar is a polysaccharide. Gelatin should not be boiled, because it breaks down. Agar needs 95 deg C to dissolve, so usually it is simply boiled. This means, that if your receipe calls for boiling the agar with stuff ...


4

"Texture" the hydrocolloid recipe collection says the typical concentration of agar agar is: 0.2% will set 0.5% gives firm jelly How much gelatin you need depends on the bloom (strength) of your gelatin. Page 82 tells you how to convert measurements from one bloom strength to another.


4

Removing a custard (which is what creme brulee) is from its form or mold does not definitely require agar agar. Flan, which is famous from a number of cuisines, is an unmolded custard. While experimentation would be required, it is highly likely that if you use a silicone based flexible form, and make a fairly stiff custard, you will be able to gently and ...


4

I've been making a lot of room temp gelatins lately; not gummybears, something else with a bit lower gelatin concentration. The secret ingredient seems to be time. The first day, things are pretty jiggly, but even when hermetically sealed, things get tougher and tougher over a course of about three to four days. I expect it's some colloid maturation process ...


4

I believe the key element that you are missing would be corn syrup. The recipe I work with (in a link below) uses 1 box Jell-o gelatin 2 packages unflavored gelatin 1/4 cup corn syrup 1/2 cup of COLD water (the cold water is important to the consistency as well) If you want to skip the packaged "Jell-o", in favor of more gelatin, your own flavoring and ...


3

It depends on how you are using it. Most likely, as the other users suggest, you must heat it when combining with other ingredients so they bond together via the heat, and your recipe will set into a gel by chilling the mixture. For instance, if you are creating a silky gel topping - less firm (example: raspberry foam topped Prosecco), it is also best to use ...


3

The viscosity of a xanthan solution is virtually unaffected by temperatures from freezing point to boiling point of pure water and it hydrates rapidly in cold water. You don't need to let it sit on its own and the temperature doesn't matter. The viscosity of a xanthan solution lowers when whisking or stirring, a process known as shear thinning. When you ...


3

It doesn't seem like you can get a soft, elastic gel using agar, Modernist Cuisine lists an elastic one but classifies it as firm(4-140): Texture Firmness Gelling Agents Scaling ---------------------------------------------------- Elastic Firm Locust Bean Gum 0.15% Agar 0.10% ...


3

Well, from what I know, even though your measurements were not accurate or the agar wasn't a hundred percent pure, it should not affect your mixture in such a way . The reason why your turkish delights turned wrong is more likely that you used fruit juice. When using agar agar to make candy or firmer gel bases, it is not recommended to use fruit juice since ...


3

Basically you can't actually make soft-serve style yogurt in a regular freezer. It's just too cold. However, you can make it softer by doing one or more of the following: adding additional sugar. After a certain concentration, sugar prevents ice cream, sorbet and frozen yogurt from freezing as hard. Adding some concentrated source of alcohol. I often use ...


3

I just checked the ingredients on one of the Vitafusion bottles I have and I believe the secret ingredient to "non-melting-gummies" is WAX. They use either beeswax or carnauba wax. Other than that they are pretty much like homemade gummies with the exception of using glucose and sucrose syrups which I don't believe would make a difference in whether they ...


3

I use an immersion blender angle @ about 45 degrees to create a vortex. I gently and slowly sprinkle the xanthan gum into the vortex then use the blender to make sure all of it is incorporated. I have not had any problems with clumping unless I add too much at a time.


3

Agar is a gelling agent and will not work as a coagulant. Give epsom salts a try. I have not experienced the graininess that you suggest.


3

This will give you a soymilk jelly, which might or might not make a good component for desserts, but that is a distinct preparation from tofu, which works by coagulating the proteins in the soymilk itself instead of leaving the soymilk intact and incorporating it in a jelly.


3

So I finally was able to test out making the berry gel using some berry coulis. I used one half cup coulis in a small saucepan and added 1/8 teaspoon Agar Agar powder brought it just up to the boil then put it in a plastic container and put that in an ice bath. I checked in it a half hour later and it had jelled. I then blitzed it with my hand blender and ...


2

In my experiments with pureed blueberries as a photosensitizer in optical detectors, I've experienced that the pectin tends to leave the top fluid phase when centrifuged a lot. 4000G, for 60 minutes, has done the trick - at least I don't experience gelling of my samples. Admittedly, it's of somewhat limited usefulness, but you never know.


2

A couple simple, practical things to go with Sobachatina's suggestions: First, you can break up the gel with a serious blender, not just a whisk. If it gets liquid really flowing, it'll disintegrate pretty well. Even easier, though: just don't chill it, at least not that much. What exactly you can get away with depends on your ice cream maker, the ...


2

Besides the points made by derivative and Michael, I noticed that it helps to mix the xanthan gum first with some other dry powder and to hydrate it by mixing it at very high speeds. When I use it in a salad dressing I mix well some sugar (5 times by weight) with the xanthan before pouring it into the food processor. The sugar separates the xanthan grains ...


2

Are you measuring your xanthan gum accurately, with a scale that goes down at least to tenths of a gram? The practical range of application is about 0.05% to 0.8% of the weight of the liquid. Much above that and it will be very snotty and unpleasant. You've got to measure it quite precisely if you want reproducible results. If you need a scale for modernist ...


2

About two years ago I read about the "ultimate chocolate mousse" from Heston Blumenthal. Interestingly, the recipe only calls for two ingredients: bittersweet chocolate and water. Sugar can be added, but it is optional. It is all in the technique. You use an approach that is similar to tempering chocolate and then whip. Place a mixing bowl over a bowl ...


2

If you are able to get hold of it, I have used vegetarian gelatin substitute in the past, and found it to be fine. I'm in the UK, and most supermarkets stock something like Dr. Oetker Vege-Gel or their own brand (often called vetetarian gel, rather than gelatin(e), to avoid confusion). If you are looking for an agar conversion, Joy of Baking suggests that a ...


2

Gelatine has nothing to do with a mousse. That means it's no problem to find a recipe without ;) . I'm doing Mousse au Chocolat like that: melt 200-250gr (more is better for stability) of chocolate (70%+ cacao) in a baine-marie whip 400gr of cream whip one egg yolk in a baine-marie until fluffy * mix the chocolate into the egg yolk carefully fold the cream ...


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