8

Yes! I was able to make a panna cotta using this product in a standard recipe with some minor changes. Just incorporate the Jell Dessert powder where the gelatin is called for and subtract 1/4-cup from the prescribed sugar. I started with this recipe on JoyofBaking.com. The recipe, like most I've seen, calls for one standard 1/4-ounce packet of gelatin. ...


7

An agar gel sets as it cools, like almost every other thermoreversible gel - including those made from gelatin, carrageenan, and various types of gellan and pectin. One of the properties of almost any gel is that the gelling agent needs to be dispersed and then dissolved in the solution, otherwise you'd never be able to mix it - you'd just instantly get a ...


5

I've been making a lot of room temp gelatins lately; not gummybears, something else with a bit lower gelatin concentration. The secret ingredient seems to be time. The first day, things are pretty jiggly, but even when hermetically sealed, things get tougher and tougher over a course of about three to four days. I expect it's some colloid maturation process ...


5

Try using mallow root. It is where the confection got its name, and is the very ingredient that has been superseded by gelatin.


5

Yes. Yes it does. Unfortunately, I did something similar once, and it basically gave my pastry cream the consistency of creme anglaise. It made a delicious ice cream base, but failed as a cream puff filling. My best explanation is that the blender destroyed the protein structure of the partially cooked egg, but my attempts to look into it in the past haven't ...


4

Removing a custard (which is what creme brulee) is from its form or mold does not definitely require agar agar. Flan, which is famous from a number of cuisines, is an unmolded custard. While experimentation would be required, it is highly likely that if you use a silicone based flexible form, and make a fairly stiff custard, you will be able to gently and ...


4

I use an immersion blender angle @ about 45 degrees to create a vortex. I gently and slowly sprinkle the xanthan gum into the vortex then use the blender to make sure all of it is incorporated. I have not had any problems with clumping unless I add too much at a time.


4

I believe the key element that you are missing would be corn syrup. The recipe I work with (in a link below) uses 1 box Jell-o gelatin 2 packages unflavored gelatin 1/4 cup corn syrup 1/2 cup of COLD water (the cold water is important to the consistency as well) If you want to skip the packaged "Jell-o", in favor of more gelatin, your own flavoring and ...


3

To thicken a liquid with xanthan gum, first disperse it in another powder, use small amounts, and once in the liquid, mix well. Whenever I use it in sweet dishes I disperse it in sugar (at a 10 to 1 ratio), and for savory dishes, in starch or salt. Xanthan is slow to mix, so I always do it with a food processor or blender. Small amounts means one part in ...


3

This will give you a soymilk jelly, which might or might not make a good component for desserts, but that is a distinct preparation from tofu, which works by coagulating the proteins in the soymilk itself instead of leaving the soymilk intact and incorporating it in a jelly.


3

Agar is a gelling agent and will not work as a coagulant. Give epsom salts a try. I have not experienced the graininess that you suggest.


3

You have to dry the gummies for 3 days. Start with so much gelatin that it's just slightly difficult to eye dropper into the mold, then back down from that. Let them harden overnight in fridge, spray coconut oil on hands and on back of gummies in the mold, then rub them with your hands as each one is removed, making sure they are coated with the oil, but ...


3

I just checked the ingredients on one of the Vitafusion bottles I have and I believe the secret ingredient to "non-melting-gummies" is WAX. They use either beeswax or carnauba wax. Other than that they are pretty much like homemade gummies with the exception of using glucose and sucrose syrups which I don't believe would make a difference in whether they ...


3

The viscosity of a xanthan solution is virtually unaffected by temperatures from freezing point to boiling point of pure water and it hydrates rapidly in cold water. You don't need to let it sit on its own and the temperature doesn't matter. The viscosity of a xanthan solution lowers when whisking or stirring, a process known as shear thinning. When you ...


3

It doesn't seem like you can get a soft, elastic gel using agar, Modernist Cuisine lists an elastic one but classifies it as firm(4-140): Texture Firmness Gelling Agents Scaling ---------------------------------------------------- Elastic Firm Locust Bean Gum 0.15% Agar 0.10% ...


3

It depends on how you are using it. Most likely, as the other users suggest, you must heat it when combining with other ingredients so they bond together via the heat, and your recipe will set into a gel by chilling the mixture. For instance, if you are creating a silky gel topping - less firm (example: raspberry foam topped Prosecco), it is also best to use ...


3

Besides the points made by derivative and Michael, I noticed that it helps to mix the xanthan gum first with some other dry powder and to hydrate it by mixing it at very high speeds. When I use it in a salad dressing I mix well some sugar (5 times by weight) with the xanthan before pouring it into the food processor. The sugar separates the xanthan grains ...


3

So I finally was able to test out making the berry gel using some berry coulis. I used one half cup coulis in a small saucepan and added 1/8 teaspoon Agar Agar powder brought it just up to the boil then put it in a plastic container and put that in an ice bath. I checked in it a half hour later and it had jelled. I then blitzed it with my hand blender and ...


2

In my experiments with pureed blueberries as a photosensitizer in optical detectors, I've experienced that the pectin tends to leave the top fluid phase when centrifuged a lot. 4000G, for 60 minutes, has done the trick - at least I don't experience gelling of my samples. Admittedly, it's of somewhat limited usefulness, but you never know.


2

About two years ago I read about the "ultimate chocolate mousse" from Heston Blumenthal. Interestingly, the recipe only calls for two ingredients: bittersweet chocolate and water. Sugar can be added, but it is optional. It is all in the technique. You use an approach that is similar to tempering chocolate and then whip. Place a mixing bowl over a bowl ...


2

If you are able to get hold of it, I have used vegetarian gelatin substitute in the past, and found it to be fine. I'm in the UK, and most supermarkets stock something like Dr. Oetker Vege-Gel or their own brand (often called vetetarian gel, rather than gelatin(e), to avoid confusion). If you are looking for an agar conversion, Joy of Baking suggests that a ...


2

Gelatine has nothing to do with a mousse. That means it's no problem to find a recipe without ;) . I'm doing Mousse au Chocolat like that: melt 200-250gr (more is better for stability) of chocolate (70%+ cacao) in a baine-marie whip 400gr of cream whip one egg yolk in a baine-marie until fluffy * mix the chocolate into the egg yolk carefully fold the cream ...


2

Are you measuring your xanthan gum accurately, with a scale that goes down at least to tenths of a gram? The practical range of application is about 0.05% to 0.8% of the weight of the liquid. Much above that and it will be very snotty and unpleasant. You've got to measure it quite precisely if you want reproducible results. If you need a scale for modernist ...


2

I've tried adding gelatine, tapioca, corn starch to agar to make it less brittle. None of them work very well until they start to become the major component of the gel. Adding glycerin or sugar syrup is also fruitless.


2

It will not have the same texture or taste as tofu which may be acceptable to you. It is very much a jelly/jello as pointed out by others. The biggest difference is that you will not be able to cook this gel-based tofu. For cold use, it would be fine. Agar will soften and melt when heated, melting point is concentration and acidity dependent but always well ...


1

What comes to mind is the emulsifying properties of eggs. When eggs emulsify with the fat it creates a smooth or luxurious texture. Less fat might make the texture less desirable and the gelatin might improve the texture. As for how well the cake will set, I don't think that adding more gelatin because there will be less fat is going to matter. Eggs are ...


1

In lower concentrations of Agar Agar you'll have weeping (Syneresis); Xanthan gum is generally used to lower syneresis when combined with other hydrocolloids. Apart from slight texture changes; you'll benefit from less weeping. per this paper Evaluation of Blends of Alternative Gelling Agents with Agar and Development of Xanthagar, A Gelling Mix, Suitable ...


1

I've been experimenting with gelatin alternatives to make vegan gummy bears, and in my research I've noticed the temp influenced changes for different ingredients: gelatin (melting point): 95F / 35C agar agar (starts to lose firmness): 149F / 65C agar agar (melting point): 185F / 85C konjac (melting point): 217F / 103C I have also read that too much ...


1

The book Putting Food By (Hertzberg) has a recipe:10 lbs. apples yields 1 pint pectin. Seems jam & jelly specific.


1

If you want firmer Gummies cook to a higher temp and add modified cornstarch or cleargel after cooking alsobe sure to bloom your gelatin. I am a former Candy maker with 20 years experience. You can find cleargel on amazon or if you have a local gourmet store they may carry it.


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