19

I would not keep them in water; they will absorbe water and get soggy. I'd just drain them and toss them with a little bit of oil, just enough so that they will not stick together and put them in the fridge. ( a little bit like when you're making pasta salad).


17

I am German, let me try to help, I've made many dumplings: There are four types of potato dumplings. They are called Klöße in northern Germany and Knödel in the south, both words mean the same. -Rohe Klöße (Raw Dumplings). These are made from raw grated potatoes. They are the most difficult to make. The surface is shiny and a bit slimy and you have pieces ...


9

As I am from "Apfelschorle Country", I have to chime in. Note that some statements below are subjective to a certain degree. For me, a real Apfelschorle is apple juice and carbonated water, poured into one glass at roughly a 1:1 ratio (or a bit more juice), not stirred. Bottled Apfelschorle is in my very personal opinion not the real deal - that's a ...


8

Disclaimer: I have eaten them often (I live in Germany), but never made them myself. The versions with raw potatoes exist, but are uncommon. When you say Klöße in Germany, everybody assumes the cooked-potato variety. I checked the biggest German online recipe database, and the most popular recipe there uses starch, other popular recipes include flour. ...


7

Get rid of the water. That's probably why you have had better luck with the prepared rosti. After shredding, salt the potatoes and wring the heck out of them using a clean towel. America's Test Kitchen has a fun little trick in their recipe for latkes. They wring the salted and shredded potatoes over a measuring cup. After a few minutes, the starch from the ...


7

I agree that they should not be kept in water. I usually rinse them well with cold water (from the tap, but no ice) after taking them from the pot, and then let them drain well. After rinsing, they also don't stick together very much. Before serving, I heat them by lightly sweating them in a frying pan with butter.


6

The meat for rouladen is cut from the upper part of the hind legs of the cow, or Oberschale. You definitely don't pound rouladen; pounded meat tends to re-contract somewhat under heat, and this unacceptable in this case. I don't know how to cut it that way at home. In Germany, the butcher sells the meat pre-cut to the correct size. I guess that he "peels" ...


6

Yes, you can freeze them: I have done it before, and it works just fine. They key (in my experience, that is) is to freeze the balls quickly if uncooked, and put them into the boiling water still frozen when you actually do the cooking. I have also been freezing cooked potato balls, and that works just fine as well -> In that case, warm them up in hot, but ...


6

I typically use kosher salt. You could use sea salt as well. It is not necessary to use canning salt.


6

You are comparing two rather different things. A mixture of apple juice and water that is then carbonated (as your bottled product would be) is quite different from a mixture of still apple juice and carbonated water. I know that both alcoholic and non-alcoholic carbonated cider/apple juice typically have small bubbles. And you can purchase carbonated apple ...


5

My Kartoffle Knoedel: I cook my russet potatoes with the peel. Make sure they are done but not overdone. As soon as they are done, they dried in a bowl. Or you can make baked potatoes. The secret to kartoffel knoedel is that the potato is as floury as possible. When they are cold I put them through the potato ricer, add pepper, salt and nutmeg, add ...


5

Short answer: There should be no egg in Kartoffelknödel. It's usually 50% raw and 50% cooked potatoes. Grate the raw potatoes. Squeeze out the juice with a dish towel. Let the juice sit. Then mix the potatoes together. Drain the excess water from the juice and add the starchy rest to your dough. Add some more starch and semolina (i imagine breadcrumbs might ...


5

I grew up eating these and longing for more, they were a special 'treat' : My mother had special muslin sacks that she had made to help "drain" the raw potatoes that she had put through a meat grinder after they had been peeled washed and set on a tray to dry off . We would hang them to let the excess moisture weep out and then twist them to squeeze out ...


5

I have finally found a solution to this issue, which, apparently, many complain about on the internet. I am specifically answering my question about frying, and this should go for both store-bought mixes and self-made ones. Based on my experience, however, I recommend store-bought. Solution: Do not form the rösti "pancake" (I shall call it röstitaler) ...


4

My mother (from Vienna) used to make these. We called them "gummi" knoedeln. You've inspired me to try to make them again. I don't have exact quantities, but here's basically how she used to make them. She put the RAW potatoes through a juicer and collected the potato "meat" left behind in the juicer. To this she added egg, semolina, salt and sour ...


4

There is no standard spice mix for Doner Kebabs. This generally applies to any food in any part of the world. There can be a common mix, but as you have experienced, they can be quite specific to certain areas of the world A major factor for noting a common spice mix is the global food supply industry. What happens in general is that food retailers buy bulk ...


4

In order to get crispy-crunchy fried onions, you need to deep-fry them at a high temperature. Pan frying just won't get them crunchy, they'll just get softer and softer as they get browner and browner. I don't know where you are from, but we have a product in the US that is ubiquitous in late fall, particularly on the Thanksgiving table. Perhaps something ...


4

I can only answer as to the USA. In the US, English speakers do not say krapfen, nor would most English speakers be familiar with the word.


3

Penn State Extension recommends: Cover with a plate weighted down with jars filled with water or cover with a large food grade plastic bag filled with salt water (6 tablespoons salt per gallon of water.)


3

From what I can find from various sources in German, a typical "Döner spice blend" includes a lot of black pepper and salt, followed by oregano or marjoram, garlic powder, onion powder, cumin, and cinnamon. Additionally, most retail products include an instant broth powder, and a fair dose of MSG or related "flavor enhancers". Most products will have some ...


3

In the UK I have come across a Doner Kebab Mix that you can buy from local shops or eBay. You may be able to get some information or ideas from that mix. It is very good and better than the kebab i get from my takeaway. Search eBay for Doner Kebab Mix or Seasoning.


3

My Oma and Opa came over from Germany after WWII and brought my mother and her siblings. My husband and I just sold our house and are living with my Oma until our new home is finished. So, I have been on a German food binge. My Opa passed away several years ago and my Oma doesn't cook for herself anymore so I have been trying to soak up all of the German ...


3

I think your main problem may be the cooking. Once you have the consistency right (sticky and firmish) then if they fall apart it is because you are boiling them. Never ever use boiling water. Use water that is barely simmering. The water must hardly move as the dumplings are cooked. Alison Sauer (English and married to an Austro-Bavarian!)


3

To get started, follow these steps: Cook the potatoes in their skins, and save the water they were boiled in. Peel while hot Use a ricer in a large enamel dish Sprinkle potato starch over the mix, but not much too (it is easy to get potato starch during the Passover season) The trick then is the "quill", a German wooden spoon that has a star shaped wooden ...


3

Wegmans sells it as top round, already sliced and in vacuum sealed packages. Wegmans is a high end, regional grocery store in the eastern US. They carry products you can't find in regular stores. I buy 8-10 packs at a time and freeze, I'm ready to make rouladen at any time. price just went up to $7.99 a lb, but if you've ever had boogered up rouladen meat, ...


3

The lack of veal is one. But..... those who have had them in Germany (I also lived in Wiesbaden) know that the bratwurst is "gently" grilled on a flat grill, not thrown on a fiery gas grill with flames and smoke and grease splatters. Why does it matter? Well.... the American way of grilling is so intense (flames touching meat) that the casing breaks almost ...


3

Your instinct is correct, all your favourites fall into one category of saussage: Brühwurst. This means that they follow the same principle when made, which is Mincing the raw meat and fat with ice or ice water, salt, often curing salt and various spices until a smooth paste forms. This is what you refer to as "pinkish mass". Shaping the saussages (or loaf ...


3

I guess that largely depends on what portion of the country you reside in. In areas more strongly influenced by Germanic and Scandinavian immigrants (upper Midwest), German restaurants abound and even in eateries that aren't specifically "German," you get regular offerings like Bratwurst, which is a mainstay at Milwaukee Brewer and Green Bay Packer games, ...


3

After some experimenting, this is what I've found: 1) Everything should be cold (this makes sense; carbonation happens better when things are cold) 2) You can get decent results with pouring sparkling water into a cup then adding apple juice in a roughly 1:1 ratio. Pouring the water first seems to make it taste better, not sure why. 3) It's not clear that ...


2

What are billed as "brats" here in the US are only similar to German "bratwurst" by their shape! The meat is not the same, the grind is not the same, even the casing is not the same. And as others have noted, the cooking techniques (US grilling) leave much to be desired. There are commercial alternatives in the US to get those nice German style brats, with ...


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