Hot answers tagged

11

moved here from a comment: Ghee does have a different aroma and consistency, so, depending on the use of it in the recipe (wether it is used for frying or in the frosting for example), it will quite likely change the final result. So in some cases substituting butter with some neutral flavored oil or margarine might be better than ghee. Which, I know, ...


10

I was doing some product demonstrations at an Asian market in Portland once, and an Indian vendor treated me to some of his samples brushed with a brownish ghee. I mentioned that I had never seen this kind of ghee before; I was used to a more yellowish, clarified-butter style. He told me "Yeah, my wife hates it when I make this kind of ghee, but I prefer it ...


9

Judging from those Wikipedia articles: Clarified butter is rendered butter, which means that the solids are removed. Beurre noisette is browned butter, which contains the solids. Ghee is slightly-browned (it should have a golden color) butter that is rendered. So you melt the butter till it's golden. Then you remove the solids by pouring the top layer into ...


8

You can start it on high, until it is completely melted, and foaming, to save time. Then reduce to a slow simmer to evaporate the water. You want all of the water to be evaporated—this is critical to the shelf life of your ghee. This is indicated by the solids beginning to brown and the cessation of bubbles as you noted; the milk solids cannot ...


5

I don't think there is any downside to heating it again. Note that the brown bits come from milk solids so if you've already removed those (e.g., scraped them off), then you're just stuck with clarified butter. Also, for the next time you try this: the way its boiling changes as it runs out of water—and that's when the bits will start to brown. It's aroma ...


5

There's two methods for this, which can also be combined. The first, as several people have mentioned, is to make sure that the eggs and water are slightly above room temperature. At 27C/80F ghee (and, for that matter, butter) is liquid, so if you can ensure that the rest of the batter is that temperature, it will stay liquid when mixed. The easiest way ...


5

According to IndiaCurry, it should be stored in containers opaque to ultraviolet light for long term storage: The UV rays from sunlight, florescent lights, and other sources accelerate oxidation process. The storage container container for ghee must be opaque to filter out UV rays. Preferably ghee must be stored in a dark place I was unable to find ...


4

There is sadly no way to reverse or undo rancidity, and the potent flavors are very unpleasant. The rancid portion should be discarded. The photo is unusual in that there is a clear color line, which may or may not correspond to the depth the rancidity reached, or how far into the main product the unpleasant breakdown products permeated. You might try ...


4

I am not a professional baker and am still learning but I bake almost every week. In my country ghee is a main ingredient in our houses, whether its made from clarifying butter at home or just buying it. I use ghee in all my bakes, even in making caramel sauce, brownies, cheesecakes or cookies. Just be careful what the recipe calls for. If it is cold cubes ...


4

I used ghee in an icing recipe because I ran out of butter, and the texture was all wrong. Added a little milk after reading this and boom - the texture immediately improved. Some of the fat content separated, but I just poured it off and the icing was fine. I can recommend the combination of ghee and milk as a good substitution, at least for icings.


4

Ghee is basically clarified butter. If a dessert recipe calls for "butter" then it's probably not going to work. If it calls for cold butter cut in pieces... it definitely will not work. If a recipe calls for melted butter... you'll be ok.. use a touch less and add a splash of cream. Ghee is butter with the milk solids removed.


4

The primary distinction between ghee and beurre noisette is twofold: In preparing ghee, every effort is made to ensure that all of the water is evaporated from the butter, so that it is has good long term storage properties. Evaporating the water is a side effect in making beurre noisette, and so it may or may not be fully purged, and room temperature ...


4

Yes, you can use ghee or oil for sauteing instead of lard. NOTE: You will not get the same "lardy" aroma from butter, ghee or oil, but if you use other stronger aromas / spices in your recipe it might not really matter.


3

The recipe you linked says that you have to strain the ghee. The solids will be left behind in the cloth. Ghee is a bit more cooked than other forms of clarified butter, I'm not sure if you could use this method without browning the milk solids.


3

Coconut oil is used quite regularly in the southern part of India. It completely replaces ghee or sunflower oil in certain dishes. And as Chris pointed out, it definitely changes the overall flavor of your dish and it may not be a bad thing if it doesn't conflict with the rest of the flavor profile. As for the original question of frying onions, you surely ...


3

If the ghee was too hot, the eggs would cook on contact with it, so you can simply increase the temperature. Melting it in a heavy bowl (ceramic or Pyrex) would hold a bit more heat, even at sensibly low temperature, so that might help. You may have let it cool too much - it will drop to just above it's melting point, then the addition of cold stuff will ...


2

Did you make it yourself or is it bought? Ideally ghee and clarified butter should be stored in the refridgerator which is dark by default. Ghee is essentially just butter that has been clarified and has the water and impurities taken out, but sometimes some can remain which is why ideally it's best to keep it in the fridge.


2

Clarified butter (ghee) has one of the highest smoke points of any fat. It even has a higher smoke point than lard. In general any fat can be substituted for another fat, it just depends on the taste you are looking for.


2

No, ghee cannot be used in place of butter, because ghee is clarified. This removes the water from the butter, which is a key component of butter when used in baking. The water evaporating and creating steam pockets gives a lot of foods their fluffy texture. The removal of the water would create a lot of issues in getting your desserts to come out right, ...


2

I can't believe no one thinks Ghee tastes like butter. It tastes exactly like the fresh farm butter my grandmother used to use when I was growing up. Maybe slightly nuttier but not at all like any oil I have ever tasted. I can't say but think if the recipe calls for softened butter you could use equally I am almost sure but the rest I am not sure of. I know ...


2

When I make ghee I always skim the foam as taught to me by a friend from India. I was never given an explanation of why but if I leave the foam cook back into the ghee, it becomes grainy. Each time I make it, I always skim the foam and use it in stir fry the same day. No waste. If I leave the foam in the pan of ghee while it cooks down, my ghee is always ...


1

Golden goodness of ghee has a special value in the culture and cuisine of Indian sub-continent since ancient times. Ayurveda suggests it promotes digestion and increase the absorption of nutrients. Adding warm ghee to any meal enhances the taste significantly. An example is the 'tadka/tarka' added to lentils('daal') or pouring ghee over boiled rice to ...


1

Ghee is suppose to be 100% butter fat. The water has since been boiled off. If it has a liquid portion at room temperature this is either they did not remove all the water and solids that floated to the surface or an additive liquid or preservative did not set right (Most likely). I would avoid it if possible. If not, use your nose and make sure it is not ...


1

Coconut oil has a low smoke point (177-204C depending on processing). Ghee has a smoke point of 252C. The effect of this is that it will be quite hard to stop the oil burning. But that's not to say it would be impossible - softening onions and garlic in butter or olive oil is common, and they have lower smoke points still. But the texture from frying at a ...


1

Dried herbs take less time than fresh (dried herbs are usually more concentrated than the fresh). That said, I can't say that I stick to any certain time, just simmer until the ghee begins to smell aromatic.


1

Try straining it out through a fine mesh strainer.


1

You can bake with ghee as you would with butter. Like butter, ghee gets very hard when you put it in the refrigerator. Like butter, ghee gets nice and soft when you take it out of the refrigerator. Ghee lasts long than butter because the milk product is gone. Ghee has MORE fat than butter so the person who suggested you use butter and walk more has the ...


1

Homemade ghee doesn't need to be stored in the refrigerator. You can put it in an opaque container and store it in closed cupboard. Also, the older the ghee is, the yummier and healthier it is. When making ghee at home, make sure you over cook it a tad bit (this will not alter its taste). This will ensure that your ghee stays good a longer time, even over a ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible