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63

There's no reason to peel besides the aesthetics of it. There's no major flavor or nutritional difference either way. If the ginger is going to be seen then peel it, if not don't bother. The best way to peel ginger is to use the edge of a small spoon to rub it off, it works really well, takes seconds, and doesn't waste as much as using a knife or peeler.


25

Ginger is a root. Ginger root is ginger. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ginger "Ginger or ginger root is the rhizome of the plant Zingiber officinale, consumed as a delicacy, medicine, or spice." If you write ginger too many times it doesn't look like a word anymore.


22

Agree with @GdD, that the best way by far to peel it is with a small spoon. If you have a sharp enough knife and are good with it, sure that'll work too (Or the peeler). I first learned this trick from Martin Yan (Yan Can Cook) probably almost 20 years ago... here's a more recent video of him showing this. To answer your other question about why you'd peel ...


22

If your goal is longer term preservation, freezing is one of the easiest methods and what I tend to do on occasions when I've bought a lot of ginger at once (for whatever reason). While you'll lose a little flavor with freezing, when used in cooking, I find it still works well and is often difficult to distinguish from fresh. And it's quite convenient: ...


15

Some varieties of ginger contain compounds called anthocyanins which can turn blue when exposed to acids (these are the same compounds that sometimes turn garlic blue). Varieties of ginger originating in Japan contain these compounds, but varieties originating in China do not, which explains why this only happens to some ginger. The pH of ginger is slightly ...


14

I don't know of a taste reason to peel ginger, however the papery peel is tough in texture. I handle ginger in one of two ways: either I freeze it and grate it into my dish using a microplane - fresh ginger flavor instantly whenever I need it; or I chop it into a fine mince before adding. In a hearty textured dish, I guess peeling wouldn't be necessary, but ...


11

I like using a microplane to very finely grate the ginger (that's easier to do if the ginger is frozen), or making a paste with the ginger in a food processor or blender. Just peel the ginger (you don't have to be perfect), cut it into chunks, add just enough water to get almost a baby food consistency and puree. Then you can stir-fry the puree to flavor the ...


11

Vinegar is non-alcoholic, and my suggestion would be a brine of some sort, essentially pickling it. Alternatively you could just dry it out. I should also add - Ginger is a root, and can generally be kept fresh in a cool dark place (ie. a root cellar) for some time.


10

If you want to prevent the milk from curdling when adding ginger, you have to boil the ginger or at least add it to boiling milk. Ginger protease (the curdling agent in fresh ginger) is rapidly destroyed at temperatures above 70°C. It does not matter if the milk has been boiled in advance if you add ginger to cold or room-tempered milk, it will still curdle....


9

Do you want the flavor of raw ginger, or cooked ginger flavor? Ginger contains several not very water soluble flavors, some of which are converted by cooking into different not very water soluble flavors. To maximize flavor, you want the ginger mashed as finely as you can make it. That increases the surface to volume ratio of the stuff which in turn ...


9

Tried a lot of ways, grating, cutting with knife and food processor. Huge fails. This worked, use thinner pieces of ginger. Cut with clean scissors half way up in small rows. Do not cut all the way to the end. Turn the ginger and cut on the side (criss crossing). Clean your scissors with warm soapy water and a brush often (tried oil, didn't work as ...


9

Anthocyanins are antioxidants that are a very common water based pigment in plants. There are over 500 varieties that have been isolated from plants which are are responsible for many blue, red, and purple pigments in flowers and fruit. It is thought that the colors serve to attract pollinators to flowers and camouflage leaves from herbivores. They are the ...


8

Scottish, Use equal amounts of ginger to substitute for galangal. And yes, it is the best substitute available from your average non-Asian grocery store. If you can get your hands on dried, powdered galangal, however, you can do better. Add about half the amount of ginger, and around midway through cooking add a teaspoon of powdered galangal for every ...


7

I think that trying some room-temp preparation and cold extraction techniques to preserve and incorporate the tasty volatile compounds/organic acids/etc into a suspension/emulsion concentrate will serve you well. This is done by harnessing the power of the "salting-out" effect to help create a more potent water-loving-compound-extraction, followed by a ...


7

This is more likely due to the other ingredients in the paste (sugar, citric acid, vinegar and salt; mainly the vinegar) hitting the hot oil. It's the same reason you never throw water on a frier fire. Oil and water/vinegar don't mix! You can avoid it by not being lazy and using fresh ginger, which is much nicer anyway, or adding the ginger to the oil ...


6

Eat By Date claims a shelf life of about one month, in the refrigerator, which matches my experience. Ginger root is a living rhizome, and is the plant's way of storing energy to grow later. As long as it is firm, not slimy, with no signs of a mold, with a good aroma, you should be able to use it.


6

While it may not be traditional, you could cut the ginger into thin coins, which will still leave a significant surface area for the flavor to infuse into the broth. You could then remove them for service. If you don't want to have to fish through the soup to get them, placing them in a tea ball would allow you to get them out all at once.


6

You can thank gingerol for the kick in fresh ginger, and shogaol and zingerone for the heat of dried ginger. Gingerol is chemically similar to capsaicin in chilis and piperine in black pepper, but undergoes changes when heated or dried converting it to the other compounds. You can see where gingerol and shogaol fall on the Scoville scale here.


6

Galangal should keep equally as well in your freezer as ginger does. Some Asian markets even sell frozen galangal. However, galangal is usually harder than ginger so I'm not sure if your microplane will handle it. Regarding substitution, one to one is correct. Keep in mind though that galangal has a different flavor than ginger. Whenever I use galangal I am ...


6

Like garlic, ginger is best stored cool but not refigerated, or it will rapidly dry out. It will still dry on exposed faces of course, but you can just slice thinly off until you come back to usable flesh. It may also start to resume growth. That's no problem, if anything I'd say it's good - it's indicative of freshness and good conditions. A small pot (...


6

Plant it. That preserves it pretty much forever. And you get more over time! You can keep it as a houseplant. Water it every month or so. It can be harvested whenever you like, you don't even need to wait for it to grow or mature. I bought a piece of ginger, used what I needed and cut the remaining piece into 1-inch (2.5-3cm) pieces. I soaked the to-plant ...


5

It is true that in many cases having ginger skin or not, does not make any difference in flavour. However, in at least one case, you might want to skin the ginger - fresh ginger chili sauce. Otherwise, the skin and its texture might get in the way of enjoying the sauce. Especially, if the ginger is old. OTOH, the recipe might call for the explicit presence ...


5

Gingerol, named for the ginger in which it is found, are the main hot and spicy compound in ginger. It is similar in structure to capscaicin or piperine, but is transformed in cooking into the milder zingerone.


5

I see three possibilities based on what you've said: the germ of the garlic. The germ, or new sprout of the garlic, should be removed before cooking. If your garlic had started to sprout and especially if you left in the germ, this is a possible cause of the bitterness. acid. Cooking garlic in an acid environment can cause chemical changes in the garlic, ...


5

I have used excess ginger by candying it- I boil it for about twenty minutes in a simple syrup, when I take the ginger out of the syrup I place it on a cooling grate and let it cool completely. I then roll each individual piece in turbinado sugar(I have used white sugar too.) To store I place it in a plastic bag with a little extra sugar to prevent the ...


5

For extracting (to water / ghee / oil), the best way I've found is to slice long slivers of ginger paper thin, as thin as you can. The extra surface area provides better saturation, and being extra thin promotes optimal extraction. Remove the ginger after 10 or so minutes, or once you pick up a strong smell of it. For flavoring where you leave it in, I ...


4

It won't be quite the same in flavour, but it is near enough that the food will still taste good and the combinations of flavours will work well. Unfortunately, I too have had only store-bought ginger since my galangal died...


4

Growing up with ginger in all sorts of food (ethnic Chinese here), I was never afraid to find slivers of ginger in my food and I wouldn't hesitate to eat it like just another vegetable. I think the reason is because the dish was always cooked long enough that the flavour from the ginger had already dissipated fully into the dish. Thus, the slivers of ginger ...


4

Crystallized (or Stem) ginger preserved in honey is a known thing. Shelf-life is supposed to be about 3 months for the homemade kind, and I'd say twice that (at a minimum) for store bought...Those are both pretty conservative. It should have been properly prepared/canned at the start, which would reduce the possibility of some nasty microbial infestation, ...


4

Ginger root is the root itself. Ginger is the spice derived from said root. Ginger, the spice, is just dried ginger root ground into a powder. This, of course, is all just semantics. You'd not be wrong to call ginger root just "ginger".


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