A message from our CEO about the future of Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange. Read now.

Hot answers tagged

54

It's a double bubble shot glass designed for a shot (on top) and the chaser of your choice on the bottom. It is just a novelty and fancy way of presenting special drinks. Here's a video showing how it's used.


29

While an oven preheats, the heating element or gas burner will be running at full output. For an electric oven in particular, this will generate a great deal of radiant heat. Radiant heat increases the temperature of the objects it shines on, without directly changing the air temperature. So, if you place a pyrex dish in a cold oven and then turn it on, ...


22

I specifically would like to know if anyone has used a (verified) borosilicate glass pot on a gas burner stove top I have used borosilicate glass vessels on a number of different heat sources, both in laboratory circumstances and on a standard home gas stove. and if it is safe for regular use, and by "regular use" I would specifically mean: ...


21

No, you can't. You should always assume glass is not safe to use on the stovetop. Essentially none of it is, and while there are a very few exceptions, they'll say so explicitly. (For example this set says stovetop-safe in the description.) That bowl is nothing special, definitely not stovetop-safe - it'd shatter under the thermal stress. If you look ...


15

Just tried it - answer is no. Wish i'd read this before it cracked because of the heat.


15

It would depend on the type of glass. If the oven is say 300 F then starting from 40 F (fridge) versus 70 F (room) is not a big difference. If the glass is oven safe then that 30 F difference should not cause failure. 70 F to 375 F is a bigger difference than 40 F to 300 F.


14

I would absolutely not recommend heating Pyrex with any type of direct heat, ever. That stuff goes off like a hand-grenade, highly dangerous - not to mention messy. I've seen it happen too many times for it to be even vaguely worth the risk; even when accidentally placed on recently switched-off hobs. Pyrex is a low-expansion glass. However, low-...


13

First off I want to point out the term "fresh". While some containers might keep milk from spoiling for longer, it may not taste as nice. Several things might be why: 1.) Plastics leach flavor and odor into the milk. Cardboard cartons are also lined with plastic, not wax since about the 1940s. I would say this is likely the biggest impact-- I've always ...


13

Thickness is not an indicator of heat-proof glass, just think about laboratory glassware, which is sometimes quite thin. It’s rather the other way round, thermal conductivity is low for glass which can increase inner tension when heated quickly. Thicker glass will be more robust against mechanical force, simply because it’s thicker. If you want to be sure, ...


10

Filling the lower jug with water and then putting the whole thing in the freezer worked. I checked it after a couple of hours and didn't think it had worked as I still couldn't separate them, but it mustn't have finished freezing at that point because when I looked again a bit later the ice had travelled up between the two jugs and then at some point the ...


10

It looks a champagne coupe, like this. Did you ever see pyramids of glasses where a butler fills the top one and let the champagne flow? I think that's the type of glass used, like this.


10

I wouldn't pay much attention to this list. I would just get my cookware based on what functionality I need, not based on what my stove manufacturer says. The idea of not using cast iron on glass to protect the glass from scratches is as perverse as keeping a sunhat in the closet and going to the beach bareheaded to protect the sunhat from color fading. ...


9

If your jars aren't in the refrigerator already, I highly recommend unscrewing the lids as soon as possible...unless you want to be able to share stories about how you found glass shards and the smell of kimchi everywhere in your kitchen one day. Depending on when you mean to eat them, I'd recommend a mix of room temperature ripening and fridge storage. ...


9

It looks exactly like a vase for growing hyacinths to me. Edit: This is wrong. As noted in comments, a hyacinth vase has a larger hole. Search for "bubble shot glass" images to see the OP's object. Previous answer continues below... The bulb sits in the top and roots grown into the water below (you have to let the water touch the bulb until the roots ...


8

As baka has said, more volatile components of the wine will be released with more wine surface exposed. Also, this not only releases aroma but also helps the wine to "breathe" and oxidize, which is why you open the red wine bottle half an hour before serving it (so that this process starts), and why you might pour the wine into a decanter. This process ...


8

How, and if, you clean your tea pot depends both on what your tea pot is made out of, and your personal preference. The only time I've ever seen it recommended that you avoid cleaning agents entirely when cleaning a tea pot is if it is made out of clay. The reason for using only water is because unfinished clay pots, like Yixing / zisha pots, have very ...


8

First, the short answer: There's a lot of erroneous information circulating concerning glass bakeware, and very few reliable sources or repeatable experiments seem to be cited. In general, I'd say that the variance among different metal pans of different materials, colors, thicknesses, and coatings will have more significant effects than the difference ...


8

What you want to do has been done successfully. There is a video and instructions here: Guinness Cake baked in Guinness glasses I believe the greatest risk of thermal shock would come when you remove the cakes from the oven. Do not take the glasses out of the baking pan and place on a cool counter top (doing this can break some heat safe glass). Cool in ...


8

Mine are (British/European) PYREX, which is borosilicate and has better thermal properties than US soda-lime pyrex. It would almost certainly be OK, but to be on the safe side I'd put it on a room temperature baking sheet (ideally quite a thick one) before putting it in the oven. This will avoid the thermal stress caused by the bars of the shelf. Note ...


7

No. Tried it today melting some butter on a low heat and it exploded violently sending glass shards in a 1 metre radius. Suprised me as I remembered using Pyrex test tubes over a Bunsen burner in science class. Won't be trying that again. Epic fail!


7

Yes, they work. The reason they work for keeping liquid warm is because the air pocket slows down the transfer of heat from the liquid to the glass to your hand. Air has a lower thermal conductivity than glass does, which means that it slows down the loss of heat from your drink. (The thermal conductivity of air is 0.024 W/m/°C, while the thermal ...


7

While @Brendan's answer is the correct one as it comes directly from the manufacturer, the risk with glass and other ceramics is not that it will start to leach chemicals into the water, but rather that the glass has been subjected to heat in an abnormal and uneven fashion (the heat is at the bottom and localized, the top will be coolish). This uneven ...


6

Sometimes. Basically, this is the same as asking if glass is oven safe: Generally, glass is oven-safe if taken from room temperature and put in a moderate-temperature, preheated oven. The key thing is to avoid temperature shocks (which will cause the glass to shatter). Some glass is specifically designed for oven use (either by being tempered or made of ...


6

Note: I am assuming this glass is kitchenware, like mixing bowls or measuring cups, not service ware like drinking glasses or teacups. Glass melts at about 1500 F / 800 C. There is no danger of melting the glass in any type of steamer, or realistically with any equipment you may have at home. The real issue is thermal shock: very rapidly cooling glass ...


6

I suspect that it's the source of the milk rather than the container. The shorter the supply chain from cow to your refrigerator, the longer the milk will last in your refrigerator. Mass-produced supermarket milk, which is generally (always?) sold in low-cost plastic containers, spends more time being shipped and distributed than locally-sourced organic milk,...


6

Don't use brass– I believe the vinegar cleans it by dissolving a thin layer from the outside. It looks like the 304 stainless steel tap should work fine. If the rubber seal is the same material that canning (e.g. Weck) jars use, it'll probably be fine. Weck only warns against overheating vinegar solutions, which can cause the seals to become distorted— they ...


6

Assuming that you are talking about a tempered glass bowl that is marketed as microwave, dishwasher and oven safe, there should be no problem in the pressure cooker. For glass vessels, the most critical uses are rapid temperature changes and uneven heating, the surrounding pressure isn’t an issue. I recommend the following safety measures: Before every ...


5

This will be a short answer as there is not much to say: I have used cast iron pans on my glass stove top for about five years, and the surface does not show any scratches or marks. I have not taken any special care to protect the surface, and certainly have not polished the iron.


5

As Fabby says, it must have something to do with a sudden change in heat. An hypothesis: they misinterpreted the French original written by Pyrex. It says, again thanks to Fabby: Assurez-vous de toujours préchauffer le four avant d’y mettre votre plat en vitre. This means, "make sure to always preheat the oven before putting in your pan". It could be ...


5

Yes, it is safe. Just wash the bottle with dish soap and hot water. Unless you do not use the oil in the new bottle frequently, degradation from light should not be an issue; you could store that bottle in a cupboard when not in use (or get a dark glass booze bottle) Personally, I would try to use a small bottle than a 750ml bottle.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible