7

All right, I'll say it as an answer: fructose is one sugar, glucose is another. High fructose corn syrup contains plenty of fructose (but not just that) - it's made by taking corn syrup and converting some glucose to fructose to make it taste sweeter. The exact sugar makeup of glucose syrup varies (see also this previous question), but it certainly hasn't ...


7

If you cannot find these ingredients, it will be hard to get this type of icing made. The first thing is the liquid glucose. If you used any old thing labelled "syrup", chances are that it contained water, and this is what made your mix a sugar. Liquid glucose is mostly sugar, with almost no wetness to it. Substituting something very wet will not work. ...


5

You can substitute sugar straight over for glucose but you need to increase the wet ingredients or decrease the dry ingredients as glucose absorbs more liquids than regular sugar. Take a look at this article and this one! But mixing sugar and glucose is done in baking for the texture! In pretty much every other regard when it comes to cooking/baking, ...


5

Liquid glucose can be replaced with plain corn syrup, in most cases. The icing sugar is almost the same as powdered sugar, if you have access to that. If you can't find powdered sugar either, you'll need to put granulated sugar into a food processor with about 2 tablespoons of cornstarch per cup of sugar and blend it until it's a fine powder. The cornstarch ...


4

Here is a quick answer: Fructose: Sweetness of Fructose depends on temperature: at lower temperatures (i.e. ice-cream) is sweeter. at higher temperatures (i.e. hot coffee or tee) is less sweet Fructose is always sweeter than glucose Amount of calories doesn't change: cal of 1g of fructose equals cal of 1g of glucose Here's a table: SUGAR | ...


3

In boiled syrup candies like this one, glucose is often used as an insurance policy to keep all the rest of the sucrose in the recipe from crystallizing. The dissimilar sugar molecules in the solution interfere with the sucrose crystallization and they instead form smaller crystals and the candy has a smoother texture. You can easily use glucose syrup in ...


3

Glucose is water soluble, so you can use water to make it return to liquid phase. You can also probably use some penetrating oil / water displacing spray like WD40, which can also help a lot if some of it ended up on the cabinet door hinges.


3

The reason your ice-cream was sweeter is simply that honey is sweeter than straight up glucose. Ref. BBC Good Food This is because fructose is sweeter than the same quantity of glucous. Ref. from healthline BBC has a good guide to swapping sugar for healthier substitutes (I assume this is your aim!) Link but nothing about ice-cream. I would recommend ...


2

Buying local honey is one way to be sure that what you are getting is "honey". I've never heard of people passing off something else as honey. Isn't that why we have the fda? If you are buying it in the store, check the lable... my honey has one ingredient; honey.


1

Yes, you can do it. In fact, most recipes for candy I have followed suggest to do it that way. Just add your acid before starting to heat the syrup, and proceed with the candymaking as usual. I suspect that the reason the recipes for inverted syrup specify an upper limit for the temperature is because they are recipes for syrup. If you overheat them, you ...


1

It is possible that your syrup is not cooked down far enough, and the moisture content is softening the waffle cookies. It helps to batch-make syrups, using extended cooking times to ensure a thicker, less moist syrup, and just store what you don't use for next time (saves time and effort). You can also use gums or starches to provide extra thickening (...


1

Glucose is used to supersaturate the refined sugar. Without it, the refined sugar would crystallize after some time. We don't want our marshmallow to be like that.


1

As mentioned above, glucose and fructose are very different kinds of sugar. Glucose is the six-carbon simple sugar molecule that is the most basic form of energy our bodies use for aerobic metabolism (glucose + oxygen --> CO + H2O +energy). Fructose is a different sugar, that has to be metabolized mostly in the liver, and is not the "clean" burning fuel ...


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