24

I went into some detail with this in my answer to What are the factors that affect the chewiness, softness, moisture of bread based desserts like cinnamon rolls? To summarize my points there and add some more (simplified) detail on the chemistry: Gluten is responsible for elasticity of dough, which is perceived as chewiness. The difference between bread, ...


18

The main source of gluten in pierogi (the plural is pierogi, the singular is actually pierog) is the flour in the dough. You should be able to substitute regular flour for a gluten free version (eg rice flour) to make them gluten free. The same goes for whatever filling you are using, if you would regularly use flour as a thickening agent try corn starch or ...


15

Assuming this is actually a recipe that worked for your friend (it does seem pretty weird - see rumtscho's answer)... We are both using a soup spoon, not a measured one, Yet we get different results. That's exactly why you got different results. Your soup spoons aren't necessarily the same size. You need to use some kind of reliable, standard ...


14

You could use a mortar and pestle, if you have a good (and large) one - though it would take a lot of time and grinding to make it work, and probably small batches to fit your mortar and pestle size, it is doable, especially if this is a one-time use. you would probably not want to do this often, though. You might try a blender, it's very similar to a food ...


13

Note that wheat is a type of grass, and is technically a grain. Grains without gluten Not all grains have gluten—only those closely related to wheat do. Grains which do not have gluten include: Corn (maize) and its variants or derivatives such as cornmeal, polenta, hominy, or masa Rice (all varieties) A note on rice: some varieties are called "...


12

This seems to be a poorly designed recipe, or maybe something is omitted. You have absolutely no flour in it, so the baking powder doesn't get a chance to do much. It would make sense if it were a sweet souffle, but the instructions are wrong for it. You seem to misunderstand imperial measurements, maybe you are from a part of the world which doesn't use ...


11

No, it doesn't. Rice is always gluten free. It just so happens that words like "gluten", "glutinous" and "glue" are words which have a common root, meaning "sticky". Glutinous rice is sticky due to a high proportion of bushy starches in the rice grain. It has nothing to do with gluten, which is a complex formed by wheat proteins, and not contained in any ...


10

Then the explanation for the flour is that the water and flour interact to produce gluten that then gives the cake its structure. Your confusion is well-founded, because gluten is required to form the structure of cake is too strong of a premise. Gluten can be a primary contributor to the structure of a cake, as in a wacky cake, but it is not required. ...


9

Golden syrup is indeed gluten free, as neither sugar cane or beet contains gluten. In fact, beet fibre is used in many gluten-free products. See the Tate & Lyle site for more information: http://www.lylesgoldensyrup.com/healthandnutrition.php


9

Of course it won't be the same, it will be different. If the cranberries are sweetened, which dried cranberries often are, then just a straight substitution should work. The cookies will be a bit tarter, but should be just as delicious. If the dried cranberries are unsweetened, then it probably does make sense to add a bit of sugar. You can do that by ...


9

We often use a coffee grinder to make almond flour for my son who is on a very restricted diet. We use a simple 19.99 blade grinder rather than a burr grinder. We've also used it to create powdered sugar from Xylitol and from ordinary cane sugar, and tapioca starch from tapioca pearls. Good luck!


8

I run a gluten free bakery and yes, over mixing is a concern for many cake batters, cookie doughs, pie crusts, etc. I find, what makes overmixing an issue is the gums used in the recipes. This being either xanthan or guar. An over-mixed cake batter will become very stringy and goopy, and will not pour smoothly when run off of a spoon, for example. Cookie ...


8

Sure. Generally, whatever mix-ins you add to a cookie can be traded out for other things. You can even use half as many chips and add half as many cranberries if you like. Honestly, you can probably increase the percentage of mix-ins by half without doing damage to the final product, so if the recipe calls for 1 cup chips, you could add 3/4 cup each chips ...


7

I would go out an buy some. Dough textures for gluten-free breads are fragile and the result of extensive testing with various non-wheat flours (at least, good ones like Serious Eats are). None of the other flours you have available will have the same water absorbsion or starch content which rice flour does. If you substitute, you'd have to make the ...


7

This depends of course on what you are using for gluten-free flour, but according to Khymos' Data (PDF warning) and corroborated by my own experience, 1.5% is about the maximum concentration of xanthan you would ever use, beyond which food starts to get really slimy. The recommended amount for flour is going to depend on exactly what kind of "gluten free ...


7

If there's leavening in the cake (baking soda or baking powder) that gets activated once incorporated with the rest of the ingredients, and you substantially overmix, you may lose some of its power as you help the gas escape from your batter. Unless you're whipping it vigorously, you're not going to be bringing enough air into the batter to make up for it. ...


7

There are a number of rice-based bread crumb replacements, but my experience with them is that they are more like rice sand than bread crumbs. You can try making you own from other gluten free products like waffles or maybe puffed rice cereal.


7

AFAIK, (which isn't much) there is no one good substitute for eggs in baking. This is because the egg can be there for one or more of several reasons. This includes as a flavorant, emulsifier, moisturizer and leavener. So, I'll address each of these separately. Flavor - I have yet to find an ingredient or ester I can easily produce to replicate the very ...


7

Pure oats ARE gluten-free. If you can't tolerate gluten at all, you need to be sure that your oats aren't "processed in a facility that also processes wheat, rye or barley", which can contaminate oats with gluten. The big brands in the US that guarantee gluten-free are Bob's Red Mill and Trader Joe's. Check the label if you are sensitive to gluten! Quaker ...


7

That very same source says: The following yeasts are all gluten-free: active dry autolyzed (not autolyzed yeast extract – see below) baker’s nutritional That includes just about any type of yeast that you'd use for baking. "Brewer's yeast" is unique because it's typically harvested from previous batches of beer. Specific yeast strains ...


6

It's the water in your skin more so than anything else that makes it stick to your hands; generally the most effective way to prevent any kind of water-based dough or batter from sticking to your hands is by greasing them. Some of the fat might get into the dough, but not really enough to make a difference. Any kind of fat will do. Vegetable oil is the ...


6

It depends on what you mean by gluten-free flour. If you are buying a gluten-free flour mix that it labeled for all-purpose use then you should be able to substitute that and get a reasonably good result. Substituting straight rice or almond flour in a standard recipe will not work well, because the mixes have a blend of ingredients designed to make it ...


6

It seems like a lot of recipes recomend gelatin, which could add to the stretchyness. I frequent serious eats and a while ago they posted this recipe and they claim that it is great and stretchy. http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2011/04/gluten-free-tuesday-easy-pizza-crust-recipe.html


6

I imagine you have tried recipes already with an appropriate quantity of xanthum gum and starches... are you making any substitutions, or omitting ingredients? Substitutions really change the game significantly, even unwitting substitutions like sweet rice flour vs white rice flour, potato flour vs potato starch. Substituting an alternative flour directly ...


6

The difference between gluten and gliadin is the one already explained in your question: Gliadin is a precursor to gluten. You could say that gliadin is to gluten what grains are to porridge. Gluten is the result of glutenin reacting with gliadin in the presence of water, just like porridge is the result of grains "reacting" with milk in the presence of heat....


6

Chicken gizzards have a tough membrane on the inside (the only part that gets in contact with the bird's food) that holds the stones + grit + food during the grinding part of the digestion process. That membrane is always removed before selling the gizzards, so I don't believe there will be any residue there - I never saw one sold with that membrane.


5

In an answer to another question, someone else was looking for answers on dealing with thickening dairy. If you want to address thickening with corn starch, here are some beginning steps; Use the right ratio of corn starch slurry to liquid: 1 tablespoon corn starch thickens 1 cup of liquid Use the corn starch in a slurry: although you didn't mention clumps (...


5

To summarize the points of Aaronut's answer and provide a framework for answering: 'Gluten is responsible for elasticity of dough, which is perceived as chewiness','The "rising" in baked goods is essentially just stretching of the gluten network', 'Gluten is also exceptionally good at both absorbing and retaining moisture' Dough's rising is catalyzed ...


5

SAJ14SAJ has great info. But in addition, if you are extremely sensitive to gluten as such with a severe allergy or certain digestive issues cross contamination is frequently an issue. Certain companies are more "allergy friendly" and have separate processing plants. Bob's Red Mill comes to mind for some of their products, but I've seen it with a few other ...


5

The simple answer to your question is the kind of starch they use. Most use cornstarch or tapioca starch, neither of which contain gluten, so most powdered sugar shouldn't contain gluten. If the type of starch isn't listed, don't buy that product. For absolutely no gluten, it gets a bit more complicated. A Google search for "Gluten Free Powdered Sugar" ...


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