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30

I suppose I should precursor this with "I'm really, really fussy about fast-cook Italian food. I will almost never eat in Italian restaurants [in the UK] because they simply fail to get something as simple as this right, every single time. I won't eat anywhere that I can out-cook." I'd forget all the 'putting aside', you can do that in one pan, no savers. ...


6

I'm going to propose a different cooking method that's closer to cooking it on the stovetop; gnocchi when cooked wrong can be quite dense. It's still edible, but it's not as enjoyable. take your cooking vessel, and heat up your cooking liquid (I'd go with just water, as we don't know how much liquid it's going to absorb, and we don't want too runny of a ...


6

I typically use potato, flour and egg. Make. Freeze. Then, go directly from freezer to boiling water. Do not defrost first.


5

There are several styles of gnocchi. For potato gnocchi, use starchy, russet potatoes. Boiling, steaming, or baking will all work. I prefer baking, as it is easier to control the moisture content when mixing with eggs and flour. Pass your cooked potato through a ricer or food mill before adding eggs and flour (though some folks use a fork and like rustic,...


5

This is what I would do; The strategy is to have all the "put aside" plates or bowls ready when you start cooking. The bacon and spinach we be re-heated in the last step. Fry bacon; put aside. Cook spinach in some of the bacon fat; put aside. Cook gnocchi in water; quickly strain and then fry in some of the bacon fat. add spinach and bacon to gnocchi and ...


5

I cook quite a lot with one pan, and the trick is often to take things out and reserve them. When cooking for just myself I use the plate/bowl in going to eat from for reserving cooked elements. If the bacon is likely to give enough fat to fry the gnocchi, I'd start with the bacon. When cooked, remove with a slotted spoon and fry the gnocchi. Fresh spinach ...


5

I made gnocchi for 2 years at restaurant... in those two years i observed to following things about making gnocchi. the type of potato Changed the ratio of flour, and egg if using egg. As i am living in the Southern Arizona. I settled on using the Classic 1 lbs Russet Potato. the size of the potato and how long and at what temperature you bake it... I ...


4

If there is no salt in the gnocchi, then salt the water. Pasta (and probably dried gnocchi) should always be cooked in salted water. It just tastes flat otherwise.


4

Some ideas: I like to do do pumpkin gnocchi. The dryer the pumpkin, the better, since you will need to add less flour and get a lighter result. It has a lovely sweet taste compared to potato gnocchi and goes really well with sage and butter or blue cheese sauce. The recipe in the link is just suggestive. My approach is to add an egg yolk and to keep adding ...


4

I think it's because there is water inside the gnocchi paste, which turns into vapor and builds up pressure. A little bit like why you shouldn't throw an ice cube in hot oil. You can pan fry them, but not deep-fry them.


4

Is it cheating to put the cheese inside the gnocchi? I've used grated hard cheeses to help take up some of the moisture from gnocchi before. If you use cheese, plus some herbs or spices (nutmeg is pretty classic, a bit of rosemary might be nice as an alternative, or even lemon zest), it shouldn't taste like a baked potato. I'd also be concerned with your ...


4

It's not traditional, but adding egg white is not unheard of, though in this example, it is not whipped. There are recipes for gnocchi with whole egg, egg yolk only, and no egg as well. It might contribute to fluffiness, but it also might throw off the consistency of the dough. As you do some research on gnocchi, you will note several other variables that ...


4

If they stay too long, they soak up water, get soggy or mushy and finally disintegrate, leaving you with a rather weird kind of lumpy potato soup.


3

Your second suggestion sounds like the most likely option. As long as you had a sufficient layer of flour, it worked, but once it was wetted through, they started sticking and fell apart. This is usual for many wet and tender doughs. Overkneading is practically unheard of in potato based doughs. In bread, you can get overkneading when you knead so much ...


3

There seem to be a ton of gnocchi -recipees floating around... so I can really only guess which ones you ususally had. But for future batches try the following: If there are gluten-free semolina you can get, use those instead of only flour. One recipe I have calls for an egg-yolk, perhaps that is what your previous gnocchi had. How did you season? Nutmeg (...


3

I scatter them on a metal tray thinly coated with flour. Once the tray is full, it goes directly into the freezer. After the gnocchi are frozen on the tray, I dump them into a freezer bag. If you pile them to deep in the freezer before they are frozen (ie in a bag or box) they stick together. Out of the freezer, directly into boiling water. Do not need to ...


3

I'd say look at the values in the back of the envelop about the amount of sodium. If it's relatively high (I'd say about 2g per 100 grams), then I wouldn't put any more salt. If it's lower then it's probably a safe bet to add some salt. As usual though, it's mostly a matter of personal taste, a little bit of salt in the water will not make them overly sticky ...


2

I've never encounter a pasta that was better when cooked in unsalted water--including dried gnocchi. Salt the water. Salt is an important part of the chemistry of taste, and nearly all food requires at least some additional salt at various stages of cooking. (Notable exceptions are pre-packaged, heat-and-serve-style, or packet/box mix convenience foods, ...


2

The beets probably contributed more liquid than planned. I would try blending them, then straining them through a chinois (use the back of a spoon to push out even more liquid after you allow gravity and a pinch of salt to do its work), and then blending the rest of the ingredients together using your hand-operated food processor. Adding more flour at this ...


2

Curry pumpkin (or squash) soup would work well. Just in time for colder weather!


2

Put the gnocci in the tomato sauce with a little extra water to compensate for the absorption from the gnocci, and then microwave until done to your liking. You may need to add water as it cooks, if they are very absorbent. The cooking time is likely to be longer, maybe even a lot longer, than boiling. You will also want to stir every couple of minutes ...


2

The only answer that makes any sense (other than the "just for show" hypothesis) is that baking in salt does create a fluffier potato. That assertion is backed up by Cook's Illustrated and the Idaho Potato Commission [citation]. So, for the lightest possible gnocchi, start with the fluffiest possible potato. I've got to say though, roasting potatoes in salt ...


2

If your potatoes are prepared correctly before adding the other ingredients, then excess water should not be a problem. After boiling your potatoes until tender and draining them, I recommend placing them on a sheet pan and drying them in a 300° F oven for 5 minutes or so before passing them through your food mill or potato ricer. With properly prepared ...


2

I finally tried adding whipped egg whites to Gnocchi. The result? It was a triumph but needed careful handling. I whipped an egg white to soft peaks then put my potato through a ricer. Then incorporated the egg white to the potato and it worked great. Then I added just enough flour to make a Gnocchi roll. I cut it into single pieces with a dough cutter and ...


1

“It's the water content in the gnocchi reacting to the hot oil. When water hits hot oil, the water boils very quickly and turns into gas, creating a very fast expansion. Because the gnocchi are relatively soft and light weight, the force of that expansion inside of the gnocchi is stronger than the tension of the gnocchi structure and the gravity holding the ...


1

I would use the water heater (or an electric tea kettle if there is one) for the gnocchi for a couple of minutes, then nuke the "cooked" gnocchis and the sauce together for 1-2 more minutes. (this is because the gnocchis need to fluff-up and expand in water, just using a microwave with water wouldn´t produce that because it would cook them from the inside ...


1

Boil the gnocchi till it floats to the top of the pan, drain it, leave it for a few minutes. Fry till brownish. I use olive oil to do mine, it always come out fine.


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