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22

Graphics and quoted text from: Whole Grains Council Grains, by definition, have 3 major parts: the germ, the endosperm, and the bran. Whole grains are those that have all of the parts of the natural seed, or kernel (not including an exterior husk that is generally inedible). To be called "Whole Grain" the product must still have all of the bran, endosperm ...


19

No. Bulgur is (almost always) made from wheat while barley is a different species. Bulgur is cracked and parboiled before sale, while pearl barley has had the outer layers of the barley grain removed but is otherwise intact.


15

Assuming you don't cook in excess water then drain it away, there's not a difference in nutritional value here, you're just not comparing the same amount of rice. Raw, uncooked rice and beans are dry. When you cook them you add water. So if say you start with 100g of raw brown rice, you might end up with 330g of cooked brown rice. If you then take just 100g ...


13

Note that wheat is a type of grass, and is technically a grain. Grains without gluten Not all grains have gluten—only those closely related to wheat do. Grains which do not have gluten include: Corn (maize) and its variants or derivatives such as cornmeal, polenta, hominy, or masa Rice (all varieties) A note on rice: some varieties are called "...


11

Looks like millet to me. Your oats were probably processed in a plant that handles various types of grain and something was mixed. It's a little hard to tell from just your picture but if it is millet then of course it is safe.


9

Basically: "Long grain" is just a generic classification for rice whose milled grains are at least three times as long as they are wide. (Don't worry; you don't have to be good at math to love rice.) Common varieties are usually simply labeled "long grain," but you might know them as basmati, Carolina, jasmine or Texmati. With "medium grain" rice, ...


8

Whole grain refers to any grain where the whole grain is used - that is, the germ (the reproductive part of the seed), the endosperm (the 'flesh' of the grain) and the bran (the skin). Non whole grain usually means the bran has been removed. This is really a whole other question, but 'durum wheat' is merely the variety of wheat used to make the pasta.


8

The main reason for using the quick release is to prevent overcooking, think about what would happen to white rice if you left the cooker to de-pressurise naturally: it would be mush. Of course, you could factor the time taken to come back to normal pressure into the original cooking time but that's fraught with difficulty because it's dependent on what ...


8

The basic cooking technique is the same for whole amaranth as for many other whole grains (e.g., barley) and grain-like seeds (e.g., quinoa): bring water to a boil, add the grain, simmer uncovered on low until the grain has reached the consistency you desire (that is the only true definition of "done" -- never be afraid to taste your food as you go!), then ...


6

You said that the dough rose but then didn't proof. Lightly textured whole wheat bread is difficult for two reasons- 1- There isn't as much gluten. 2- The gluten that is there tends to get cut up by sharp wheat fragments. The result is, as with all poor gluten development, that the loaves have trouble maintaining their structure, don't rise as well, and ...


6

Use a boiled cornstarch wash for an in oven glue Egg wash is a great glue, but generally lets go again when heated in the oven. Best used after baking not before


6

TL:DR It has no such status. People just don't really have the need to categorize it, so it doesn't belong to a special category. You are somewhat mixing up formal classifications and the process of categorization in everyday language usage. Dictionary definitions apply to everyday language, but they don't have a prescriptive status. Due to the way ...


5

SAJ14SAJ has great info. But in addition, if you are extremely sensitive to gluten as such with a severe allergy or certain digestive issues cross contamination is frequently an issue. Certain companies are more "allergy friendly" and have separate processing plants. Bob's Red Mill comes to mind for some of their products, but I've seen it with a few other ...


5

It looks to me like you need umami. One easy, healthy thing you can add is powdered dried shiitake or porcini mushrooms. I just throw the dried mushrooms into a spice grinder, it's a powerful punch. EDIT: (SAJ14SAJ refers to the same concept, glutamates, in his answer)


4

While I agree with some of the other answers that glutamates and nucleotides will help enhance the flavor of your dish, I don't think that's where you need to start. As is, your "health mash" barely has any flavor to enhance. I'd start instead by adding some aromatics. You'd be amazed how much more flavor you'll get if you just add some sauteed or ...


4

That's a nice picture of a spinning blade type spice grinder you have there. The good ones will even do whole nutmegs. You can also use it to make limited quantities of powdered sugar, oat flour, wheat flour, buckwheat flour etc. About any non-oily seed may be turned into a powder with that grinder. Trying to make peanut butter is a mistake. It goos up the ...


4

Air pockets. It's why wormy beans/grains will also float - the surface tension of the water prevents it from entering into small crevices. If you have cracks or holes in the grains that contain air, the whole ensemble will less dense than the surrounding water and will therefore float.


4

What I've done in the past is mist some water on both sides of the bread slices, then put them in the microwave for 10-15 seconds (alternatively, an oven set at 300F/150C for 5-10 minutes will do it too). Experiment with the amount of water (but keep it low) and cooking times. You should get much softer (and warm) bread slices out of it.


4

The only safe thing to do is to throw it away. Preferably with a bottle or jar it is in, if you don't care for it. If you want to keep that jar, use dishwasher on it's hottest setting. I would also use sanitizers, but I have them readily available in my kitchen due to beer brewing. You can probably go without them. Seriously, mold is really hard to get rid ...


4

Generally there is no distinction, other than that the variety for eating the sprouts may be a special one developed for taste. Having said that there is another consideration: Seeds for sowing often (not always, depends on the supplier and type of seed) are coated with anti-fungals and things to make them less attractive to pests. These seeds should not ...


3

There are three main things that are going to add or enhance the flavor of food. Salt, sugar, and glutimates. This is why the restaurant trio of salt, butter, and bacon is so effective at making things taste good. Cheese is another ingredient that brings most of these factors to the table, especially hard aged cheeses like Parmesan. Tomatoes also help ...


3

They will not "melt" into the sauce, but I think your desired effect depends on how long they cook in the sauce. I frequently make "pickled" mustard seeds, which result in a softer seed that pops in your mouth, rather than remaining crunchy. A great garnish or condiment. Not crunchy at all. There are two ways to do this: 1. bring to a boil, then strain, ...


3

Your assumptions and "hierarchy" are incorrect. "Seed" is the most basic term, the other terms are characterizations of seeds. However, the use of any given term in a culinary settings may have little to do with the term's strict botanical definition. For culinary purposes there are no definite rules for which things are called nuts, pits, beans, grains, ...


3

If you try regular oats and like them, then you might try flaked/rolled barley, if you can find it. If you have refrigeration at work (or just bring in one-day's worth each morning), you could also add wheat germ (I can't imagine having a bowl-ful of it, but adding some to your oats would change them up.) Wheetabix or shredded wheat can also be prepared ...


3

You can also prepare fine bulgur by just soaking it in boiled water. This website says to let it sit for 20 minutes, but I've done it with less. I wouldn't normally consider it a breakfast food, but if it's variety you crave, maybe you'll like it. Couscous is another option. Most couscous you'll find in grocery stores in the US is an instant variety that ...


3

From this comment on a passionate homemaking article, the commenter suggests that 2 Tbsp per quart of milk is an appropriate amount of kefir grains. In my personal experience, I've found that the amount is fairly variable, and that half to twice that suggested amount will produce kefir relatively quickly (how quickly, of course, changes with the amount ...


3

Packaged cereal such as corn flakes, raisin bran, or the Toasty O's in your picture is "ready-to-eat" — you can eat it dry, right out of the box if you wish, although many people enjoy adding some kind of milk (cows milk, soy milk, almond milk, etc.). I don't think it would taste very good just mushed up with water. If that's all I had, I'd eat the cereal ...


3

Seems like you should consider investing in a grain mill. They come in a wide variety of options from manual to electric and they have different settings for how fine a grind you can get. While many of them may not grind as coarse as needed for cereals, there are many, particularly the manual mills, that do. You probably want a burr-style mill... they're ...


3

Soak the groats in water for a few hours. Drain and dry. Use your fingers to peel off the hulls. Oatmeal typically is cut into three pieces, so try using a nut chopper device - the one with the glass container over a steel chopper that is manipulated by your hand pressing down. Using a blender creates a flour, as you posted, and that is lovely for special ...


3

I love croutons in my salad, but I don't want to use refined flour products. I mix sprouted grains with a cashew cream blend, add some miso, kimchi, veggie mix left from my juicer, nutritional yeast flakes and herbs, mix it all together and dehydrate at under 104 degrees for a day, flip it over to dh another day and then crumble it up in a zip lock bag with ...


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