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200

Concord grapes, which most grape jellies/jams/preserves in the US are made from, are derived from the (US-native) "fox grape" (Vitis labrusca) rather than (Europe-native) wine grape (Vitis vinifera). Common table grapes (the ones eaten as fresh fruit) such as Thompson seedless are also derived from Vitis vinifera wine grapes. Fox grapes have a "foxy" taste ...


30

There are lots of types of grapes. Grape flavored items tend to be closer to concord grapes than a wine grape, or the green/red ones available at the grocery store.


11

Reading your question and all of the comments (that include some valuable information that should be in your question ;-) ) answering what you really need as knowing the English words only will definitely not help you when in Hungary as I've seen many translation errors reading ingredients even in sophisticated multi-language countries like Switzerland and ...


7

Put the grapes on a plate - best if you do as many at one time as will fill the plate in one layer. Cover the plate with an identical plate turned upside down. Using a long knife cut between the plates to cut all the grapes in half at once. I use my thumb nail to scoop out the seeds, but the tip of a vegetable peeler will work better than a knife if your ...


7

A jelly or candy, even if using the same aroma compounds that a (raw or cooked) grape or glass of grape juice contains, has a very different balance of sweetness (jelly has a far higher sugar concentration), acidity (balanced by the sugar, or even removed in processing) and texture (jelly coats the tongue, has far less water).


6

Another important factor is that nice table grapes are raw. Jellies and juices have been cooked. Heat changes the flavour. Think how different are the tastes of fresh tomatoes and canned tomatoes. Drying also changes the flavour of fruits. Raisins are very different in taste from their fresh beginning.


3

I also googled it and it seems that sweet white or green grapes are, indeed, probably the closest answer. Since it is a fruit salad, you may want to choose whichever of the grapes is sweetest rather than choosing by color. Winemonger's page on malaga says that it is a white wine grape and can be called by the following names: Hunter Riesling (Australia) ...


3

I did actually do two batches with the two methods within a few weeks of asking the question. Just cooking it all together, then removing the skins and seeds with a food mill, is definitely a lot faster. Removing the skins first then pureeing, so that you only remove the seeds later... well, though it is easy to remove the skin from each individual grape, ...


3

As Blessed Geek indicates, vinegar is made by fermentation of ethanol by "mother of vinegar", a bacterial culture. This is true of all vinegar, not just wine vinegar. The unique flavor profile of various vinegars is the result of other flavors in the base wine or spirit used to produce the vinegar. (Well, some vinegars like true traditionally produced ...


3

While almost every fruit and berry contains right yeasts on its peel, according to this article people prefer to make wine from grape due to right acidity, sugar and tannins contents. I also can assume the grape was easier to process manually at almost every stage from collecting to juicing.


2

That's actually pretty a pretty common thing. Add a few cloves and a cinnamon stick and you'll have Mulled Orange Juice, or the same with grape juice. That recipe adds orange zest, lemon juice, cloves, nutmeg and a cinnamon stick. This one starts with grapes. I can't speak to the nutritional effects of heating the juices, but mulled juices sound nice on a ...


2

Vinegar is a by-product of alcoholic fermentation. Rather, alcoholic beverages might be considered the intermediate-product of vinegar-making. Therefore, apple vinegar is made from fermented hard apple cider. grape vinegar is made from further fermenting grape wine. rice vinegar is made from further fermenting rice wine. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


2

Here's how you do it: Cut Grape in half lengthwise, either all the way through or just through to the last skin Remove the seeds from each half with a serrated grapefruit spoon. Note: Assembly line is most efficient - pull enough grapes off stem to fill a plate, cut all the grapes in half, then remove the seeds from each grape.


1

The descriptions of grape leaf tea I have seen don't mention a specific age to pick the leaves at - so leaves of most any age are likely to be fine, it probably isn't necessary to only pick those of a certain age, say, the newest leaves or anything. Grape leaves are also edible (stuffed grape leaves, or pickled ones) so you may not need to worry about ...


1

I neither have, nor would, do this, for the same reason that I spit out seeds when eating seeded grapes. I suppose you can. It might not taste very good, grape seeds being what they are, taste-wise. But perhaps you like that taste.


1

Most of the recipes I see that call for the skins to be pureed and added into the jam call for a longer time on the stove for the skins, so they probably need more time on the stove in order to achieve a proper texture and flavor. That Gourmet recipe also calls for maceration in order to develop more flavor. The seeds are removed after the jam is cooked (...


1

It's easiest with larger grapes, cut through the middle rather than lengthwise. The seeds tend to end up in one half and are easily removed with the tip of a paring knife. I find that the loss of the edible portion of the grape is minimized.


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