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17

Another thickener that is readily available is gelatin. This has the added advantage that its free of carbohydrate (if you are avoiding that).


15

Consider the use of gums, which are essentially thickening agents. Xanthan gum, a bacterial byproduct, can be used to thicken sauces. Here is an example of using xanthan + [pectin] (a plant sugar gelling agent) to thicken a vegan demi-glace. A traditional demi-glace has gelatin from the breakdown of collagen (from animal bones), which is how it achieves a ...


13

Tapioca Starch - Add at the very end of cooking, it works quickly and has a pretty neutral flavour. You don't it to spend much/any time over heat. If you can't find it in your typical grocery store, you should be able to find in a typical Asian grocery store/aisle. I use this often when I have Celiac friends over. Arrrowroot powder - More stable than other ...


12

I think you probably used too much flour for the amount of liquid in your gravy — instead of gravy, you made pudding. You might be able to thin it down by whisking in some additional liquid such as milk or water before reheating it. However, next time use half (or even less) percentage of flour to liquid, and you'll have better results.


11

Hello @Phrancis and welcome to Seasoned Advice! Poutine gravy is a beef gravy made with beef or veal stock. Here is a link to a recipe . There are many other recipes online, as well. You can buy the prepared sauce online here or a gravy mix on Amazon . By the way, you were on the right track, just not quite there yet! :)


9

A gravy tastes like gravy because it has salt and glutamates, which is what yeast extract has been formulated to deliver. There is no vegan replacement. The only good way to produce glutamates in your kitchen is to sear meat. You can certainly make a veloute sauce instead of a gravy. It is made from stock and roux. Roux is a combination of fat and starch - ...


8

You can make a roux with any fat. Olive oil will certainly work. There are also other methods for thickening a gravy, such as the addition of cornstarch or arrowroot.


7

You can use cooked dry beans. I use baby Lima's, canned or freshly cooked. Do not rinse away the starch after you cook them. Cream them in a blender or food processor, place them in a skillet and add some of the drippings until it reaches the consistency you like then season, simmer and strain.


6

It sounds like you are trying to maximize the amount of pan juices, sometimes referred to be the French word jus. Any piece of meat is only going to express so much jus; if you have potatoes or other absorbent vegetables in the roasting pan, they are going to absorb it and it won't be available for another purpose such as gravy. What you still will almost ...


6

In their various parts of the world, all of these words mean sauce, at least some of the time. They come from different cultures, though, and carry different connotations at least in US usage. Short answer, though: there are no absolute differences that you can count on. Salsa This is a generic term in Spanish, and in South American cuisines. It can ...


5

If you want more gravy you need to add more liquids and natural flavours. Better if you have bone but . . . no bone: Before you roast your beef sear it, so it has good colour when it comes out, deglaze the pan/baking tray with water/red wine/white wine or Madeira one of me faves and put that to one side. (in the gravy stock pot) Add onions, carrots and ...


5

Ricardo has a very good, authentic tasting and even smelling recipe for poutine gravy: Ingredients 2 tablespoons (30 ml) cornstarch 2 tablespoons (30 ml) water 6 tablespoons (90 ml) unsalted butter 1/4 cup (60 ml) unbleached all-purpose flour 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped 2 cans 10 oz (284 ml) beef broth, undiluted 1 can 10 ounces (284 ml) chicken broth, ...


5

Your options are really limited to: Reducing, i.e. simmering until you have less of a thicker gravy, but then (i) you might not have enough and (ii) you risk overcooking the chicken (and some other ingredients) unless you remove them. Thickening. Corn starch is a common way to thicken but many other starches also work. You could even make a roux of flour ...


5

It may depend on how much blending they got. I find that if you blend them for too long or too fast, you strip the 'jelly' part from the seeds, then the seeds themselves start to break up. That tends to make it bitter, & I suspect that could be what you're tasting. My standard trick to homemade sieved tomatoes is first I rough chop them - you really ...


4

I had poutine once in Canada when I was driving through. I had dinner in a diner and poutine was the advertised special. The waitress looked at me like I was from Mars when I asked what poutine was. So I only have that one experience to draw from, but the gravy tasted to me exactly like this stuff: You can buy exactly that in any grocery store in envelopes, ...


4

I use two containers when possible. The meat and the sauce usually thaw at different rates, so you end up w chunks of frozen meat embedded in thawed sauce. This can be messy to work with. Once frozen, it's OK to combine meat and sauce in a single container. Just separate when thawing.


4

Mushrooms (esp Shiitake), tahini, tomatoes, miso, gochunjang/doubanjang, furu/sufu, seaweed, (brewed) soy sauces, fermented soybean or wheat pastes, shiitake/shiitake soy sauce can all bring umami (some Types of Doubanjang or fermented tofu might not be vegan, check what brand you use...). The one problem for extreme umami is that it works even better with ...


4

I am ethnically Italian. Whenever my grandmother would make pasta she would keep the water that was leftover. Within a day or two she would combine the water with Parmigiano rinds, whole onions (skin and all), celery ends and carrot knobs (all cooked very slowly) to make the broth she would use for vegetable soup, pasta sauce and the liquid to raise the ...


4

I'm diabetic so I cannot eat those things either. Often, I will use almond flour for a thickening agent (it's just crushed almonds into flour form). You may want to visit diabetic sites (even if you do not have it), because they have figured out substitutes for a slew of foods. Not all will be perfect substitutes, though.


4

I believe that rather than "diluting" your gravy with stock, you could instead use less roux (fat and flour) with the same amount of juices (and perhaps a bit of stock). The extra tablespoon of butter, for example, meant you were "bumping up" the thickness of your final gravy to the next level. Here's some typical ratios from an earlier Question I had about ...


4

As several comments have said already: halving a recipe generally doesn't affect the cooking time very much. Depending on the recipe you may have to keep an eye to ensure that the increased surface area (relative to volume) doesn't cause it to evaporate too quickly or develop too much crust, but for the most part the time it takes to make something hot and ...


4

Jus generally refers to a sauce or accompaniment, served alongside or on top of some other food. Stock is a (generally gelatin-rich) broth used during the cooking process, whether as a braising/cooking liquid, or reduced/thickened into another sauce. There are varying ways to make both; the terminology mainly refers to how they're served or used. In my ...


4

If it's just scorched on the bottom of the pan, and you haven't mixed the burnt material into the rest of the gravy, you can try just pouring the good gravy into another pan. If you've tried to stir it and scrape the burnt stuff off the bottom, there's not much you can do. The human palette can detect very small quantities of burnt flavours, so you won't be ...


4

The primary balancing factor for sourness is sweetness - so gradually adding sugar (plain sugar, rock sugar, honey, palm sugar...) and tasting should yield good results here. "Whereever you add tamarind, you can add jaggery", one well known indian chef tends to say in his videos. The combination of strong sourness (vinegar!) and strong sweetness (plenty of ...


3

Starch is easily digested by many enzymes. Since you probably don't want to spit into your gravy, try mixing in a raw yolk and storing it for 2-3 days. I am not 100% sure it will work, but I think it's the best thing to try.


3

It's probably less to do with the amount of juices that came out of the rib roast and more to do with the extended caramelisation of those juices produced by overcooking. Those burnt, caramelised bits left in the bottom of the pan are full of flavour and it's probably that, that added so much more flavour to your gravy than you're used to. Just replicate it ...


3

Chickpea flour is delicious. Make a slurry with water and whisk it into the juices. It is perfect for savory dishes. Find it at Indian. Grocers, it's called besan or gram flour. Also makes delicious savory crackers.


3

I would assume yes. you use 4tbsp flour and fat for what amount of liquid ? if you double the liquid, you should double the roux. If there's not enough roux, then your gravy will be too "liquid". for reference this recipe : http://www.chef-menus.com/large_quantity_recipes_gravy.html


3

Besides the issue with seeds and jelly that have already been mentioned, there's also the simple issue that the liquid tomatoes just coat everything else. This means that when bits of food come in contact with your tongue, they've already been coated in tomato juice, so the flavor is going to be more noticeable. When you have chunks, the flavors don't meld ...


2

Some people "brown" flour in a frying pan prior to making gravy. Equal amounts (1 - 3 tbsp - more for a thicker gravy) of butter or oil and flour. Lightly brown in pot. I have also browned with no butter. Our favorite way to darken gravy is to add small amounts of light Japanese soy sauce.


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