18

The spice you are looking for is called Allspice or Piment, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allspice. The Greek name is μπαχάρι, pronounced bakhari.


10

actually seafood's country origin does make a very relevant difference. Why? ocean floor type, water tempearture, tradewinds, upwelling and feed availability. Best octopus comes from Spain and Portugal (actually portuguese octopus is the best) Viet, China, Indonesia or Mexican octopus live in hot water. Portuguese coast has a very mild water temp, from 10 C ...


10

As far as I'm aware, the traditional Greek tzatziki doesn't generally include mint at all. It's a cucumber dip that is made of yogurt and sometimes includes dill or mint as a flavoring: Tzatziki (Anglicized: /tsɑːtˈsiːki/ }; Greek: τζατζίκι [dzaˈdzici] or [dʒaˈdʒici]) is a Greek sauce served with grilled meats or as a dip. Tzatziki is made of strained ...


7

Mint chutney is normally almost all herbs (mint and cilantro), and it's ground/blended so it's completely green: (from this mint chutney recipe) I can't really see the chutney/dip in your picture that well. You say it was mint and yogurt, and it looks like it might be pale green, so I'd guess it just had overall more yogurt than usual. But as long as it's ...


6

I tried freezing tzatziki sauce but wasn't happy with it when thawed as it seemed to separate easily and even when mixed thoroughly it seemed to have a different, more watery texture than when fresh. What I do now if I have cucumbers I need to use is to prepare and process them exactly as I would for fresh tzatziki sauce. I freeze the processed cucumber in ...


6

It's a tradition in Scotland as well. A boiled suet fruit cake Clootie Dumpling is when eaten at Christmas especially has small coins and charms included in the mixture. The mixture is put in a clean muslin cloth and boiled. Although traditionally eaten at Christmas the pudding is also eaten at other times but the coins/charms are only used at Christmas. ...


6

It's a Frigitello pepper, although in the states they're called pepperoncini. You can grow any spicy chili pepper in the UK provided you have a greenhouse or maybe a conservatory, otherwise don't bother, it just isn't hot enough. You can find these types of peppers in any turkish and many asian supermarkets, so no need to grow them.


5

It isn't necessary, and many recipes don't call for it. But the results will be slightly different, since the yogurt will continue to ferment (even in the fridge), and the gel structure of the proteins will set. That will alter composition of the whey that you're straining out, which means the resulting difference will have a slightly different texture and ...


5

Farro is essentially a variety of wheat, and I assume your recipe is using it in whole form, rather than milled in some way. Therefore, you'd want to substitute another grain that will provide at least a similar texture. Farro Rice is gluten-free, so you could use any kind of whole grain rice as a substitute. Brown Rice You could use wild rice, although ...


5

Yes, this is definitely a Greek tradition, a New Year's bread called vasilopita Vasilopita (Greek: Βασιλόπιτα, Vasilópita, lit. '(St.) Basil-pie' or 'king pie', see below) is a New Year's Day bread or cake in Greece and many other areas in eastern Europe and the Balkans which contains a hidden coin or trinket which gives good luck to the receiver, like ...


4

I have many times been to Greece and have had gyros there and they are not ground meat but just like the shawarma it's pieces of meat stacked and roasted. Difference is just like the others say spices and the toppings that go into the pita. Also gyros in Greece are almost always pork meat.


4

Chard isn't as tender as spinach and will require more than just light steaming lest it be chewy and fibrous. You said you want to keep its bright colors, so I would recommend blanching it in salt water. You need to add quite a bit of salt, such that it tastes like seawater. This keeps plant cells from bursting and releasing pigment. You can rinse your ...


3

There is a similar tradition in Bulgaria. On the Christmas Eve is served Christmas bread with a coin inside it. Then everyone takes a piece of the bread. The one who finds the coin inside his piece will be very lucky and happy during the next year. The Christmas bread can be in different shape with variety of ornaments and symbols. According to the old ...


3

Usually spanish and portuguese octopus is "Octopus vulgaris" and vietnamese octopus is "Eledone" And yes, there are gastronomical differences. Eledone is smaller, with less muscle and tougher. By the way, 80% of fresh octopus sold in Spain and Portugal (Octopus vulgaris) come from Morocco and Mauritania


3

I wouldn't freeze tzatziki sauce. Dairy practically never freezes well. It is a fat-water emulsion, and it is likely to change its structure a lot upon thawing. You have to prepare it and stabilize it a lot, and then also preferably use a special freezing method (such as making ice cream with agitated freezing). The other part are the cucumbers, which ...


3

Taking Daniel Chui's comment about this being similar to Coq au Vin, you could take the recommendation from Good Eats, and use a stewing hen, or if you can't find that, use all dark meat (4 thighs + 4 legs) AB: Now, why would a classic dish like coq au vin call for a tough old rooster? Because, the average 17th century French country housewife had ...


3

I haven't tried it, but I don't see why not. Sure, cucumbers have a lot of water, but you're already crushing them in a blender or processor to make the sauce, so you don't have to worry about bursting cell membranes. I suppose if you made some kind of chunky tzatziki, you might be concerned about a change in texture. I've never seen a chunky tzatziki (and ...


3

You can of course use a chicken. While you won't know if it is a hen or a rooster, it should perform fine in the dish. As a braised dish, you may do well with an older bird, although these are hard to find in the modern shopping environment. You might use a roaster (which will be quite large, but older), or a stewing hen if you can get special order one.


2

Greek gyros is always cuts of meat, not homogenised with herbs etc. like a donner kebab, and comes as either pork, or less commonly, chicken. In the UK what is described as 'chicken donner' or 'chicken shawarma' is almost always very similar to what is called 'chicken gyros' in Greece in terms of the meat and its appearance, though spices etc are different ...


2

I accepted JoshieSimmons' answer because my experimentation backed it up. Upon further research I also dug up the suggestions of adding baking soda (actually dulling the colors), adding olive oil to the blanching water (didn't seem to make any difference), and I saw more references to adding salt to the water. I didn't bother experimenting with adding acid, ...


2

I froze shredded cucumbers and used them a month later in tzatziki sauce. It turned out wonderful! First, I peeled and removed all cucumber seeds. Second, I shredded them. Third, I salted them and let them rest in my colander for about a half hour. Finally, I squeezed out as much water out as possible with paper towels. I placed them in Ziploc bag and ...


2

Kasha (Roasted buckwheat groats, not a grain at all-a seed that is used as a grain! The roasted form-called "kasha" by Ashkenazi Jews-has a nutty flavor and texture and is delicious. IF you buy them unroasted, they can be roasted easily in a dry skillet on the stove.) I grew up eating kasha served by my bubbe from Russia....


2

I have found that draining the yogurt while still warm yields a thicker end result, and more whey drained. I prefer it that way, but it does make a rather thick product that may not be to everybody's liking. I make much of my yogurt into tzatziki and therefore prefer it thicker. I also salt and dehydrate my cucumbers and thoroughly drain them to avoid the ...


2

It won't look as nice, but it should be possible to rescue the flavour. As you've also got lemon in the filling, and feta is quite tart as well, I suggest you first remove the filling and dilute with extra cream cheese (and possibly olives and cooked garlic). Reheat enough to have with the pork and chill the rest too have with something else within a ...


1

My initial thoughts would be: Sprinkle sugar over the dish, or blend it into the sauce. If the Roulade is sitting in the sauce, you might consider removing it and making the sauce fresh/over with less lemon juice. Another alternative might be adding more of the other sauce ingredients. That should dilute the extra lemon juice to the right proportion.


1

It may have been the mozzarella. When traditional Greek moussaka is topped with grated cheese, it is usually a harder, aged variety, such as Kefalotyri or Parmigiano-Reggiano. To thin the bechamel with additional milk, after the roux is complete, is fine. The roux should be very thick, as it's only flour and butter. It thins when the liquid is added, then ...


1

From my travels in Greece I can say that it's 100% dependent upon taste. I've had it many different ways. In some restaurants it's so thick that the servings sit like a block on your plate and some that the filling was quite runny and there are staunch defenders and critics of both. As with most traditional dishes there are as many variations as there are ...


1

I'm pretty sure most, if not all chickens sold commercially are hens unless otherwise specified. I think the best bet is to ask a butcher for a rooster/capon (which I'm sure they could get for you). Barring that, I would go with a free range/organic chicken instead of a broiler/fryer hen which has no taste and probably won't work well (sounds like this is a ...


1

I'm a chef, trained by "off the boat" greeks, and gyro is lamb/beef..not pork, and I find it hard to believe that the Greek family that I was trained under would be making gyro wrong.. American style is typically in a "cone" meat form, and Greek style is stacked/layered meat, then sliced as the others said..souvlaki is typically pork, which is different than ...


1

I don't know about the hardcore traditional rules, but for me, I can use it on absolutely everything, and when I am in Greece I do: In addition to salad with bread Alone with bread As a dip with meat and bread As a spread on bread Alone, as a side / antipasti for drinks In Kebab Together with Mousaka With fried / baked zucchini Watered down as a cold summer ...


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