We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.

Hot answers tagged

9

I've sauteed baby spinach many times and I've never had it become slimy. I've never seen a cookbook or article that stated that either.


8

I think that washing pre-washed greens is an issue of emotional security, if you don't trust the purveyor. As the FDA indicates: Many pre-cut, bagged, or packaged produce items like lettuce are pre-washed and ready-to-eat. If so, it will be stated on the packaging. If the package indicates that the contents are pre-washed and ready-to-eat, you can use ...


8

As Catohound already mentioned, it's a symptom of using a high speed blender. You may find this technique useful. Tcrn the blender to its lowest setting and then slowly ramp it up until the top of the liquid just starts to circulate (usually around speed 4 or 5 on a Vitamix). As you run it at this low speed, you will see bubbles coming out in the ...


7

The recipe you linked to has lentils in it. Most recipes with lentils tell you to rinse and drain them, and also to pick over them for stones. Lentils are seeds from a plant, and during their harvest, it's not uncommon for small stones to be picked up as well. (Same goes for rice and any type of legume.) If you didn't check for any small stones before ...


6

I think the problem lies in that the beans are not water blanched, but rather oil blanched. The technique is called "dry frying", and is a traditional Sichuan cooking method. The oil temp is kept low to dry out the inside while cooking the outside of the food. After the dry frying you can then stir fry the food. This technique should give you the ...


6

There are actually two kinds of tonghao (as it's called in Mandarin). The one that looks like arugula is called shantonghao (mountain tonghao). You can saute it with garlic. The 'regular' tonghao has rounder leaves. Both types of tonghao are used in hotpots - you just cook them for a short while and they're done. Similarly, they're used in savory tangyuan ...


5

According to Nutrition Data, using spinach as a sample green leafy vegetable, a 30 gram serving of spinach contains only about 1 gram of carbohydrates, and that is dietary fiber. So the simple answer is that there isn't much energy there at all, in the leaf or stem, or to be leached into the cooking liquid.


5

I have the brand of juicer (Champion) mentioned by the OP in comments. It's a rather unusual design that isn't used by most other companies. They are somewhat notorious for producing a lot of foam. I bought it perhaps 15 years ago, but rarely use it for this reason. (It still has other uses other than juicing.) Anyhow, the solution I found to this ...


5

Spinach contains oxalic acid which reacts with cast iron and carbon steel pans turning the spinach black. I'm not sure about your second question, I would suggest trying it and seeing what happens. My hunch would be that as long as you have a good seasoned coating on the pan it should be fine. But that's only supposition.


5

One problem that I've had in the past with making smoothies ahead of time is getting the right consistency because many smoothie recipes rely on ice or frozen fruit to thicken them and thus are not great after several hours in the refrigerator. I found and have been been playing with a make-ahead recipe that includes oatmeal and chia seeds placed dry in the ...


5

Both the green top and the white bulb are edible, so once you've discarded any dirty or yellow bits, it's up to you, but here are some suggestions. If it's something like a stir fry, use all of it. Generally if it's going to be cooked in with other ingredients this works, but you might have to chop very finely is some cases. I sometimes use spring onions in ...


4

I haven't tried this, but in theory, it can work: Try adding a couple of tablespoons of flaxseed oil, coconut oil (or any other healthy oil you'd drink) to the froth jar and swish around. It'll likely destabilize the foam. Additional Info: Foams are similar to emulsions and are usually caused by proteins. Many industrial processes use surfactants to ...


4

Your existing solution is the best I know of. It preserve the vegetables (or fruit) for a long time. 2 weeks are impossible at room temperature. You also get them frozen at the time of making the smoothie. Assuming that you want a cool smoothie, starting with half the mass frozen is very beneficial, because the blender heats the ingredients while pureeing ...


4

The party line from Still Tasty is to: Cut out the stems, wash, and blanche for about 2 minutes Dry Store in freezer bags with as little air as possible They indicate you will get about a year of storage from this method. That being said, the method you propose is well known for herbs, and kale is certainly much heartier than an herb. It should work very ...


4

Chard isn't as tender as spinach and will require more than just light steaming lest it be chewy and fibrous. You said you want to keep its bright colors, so I would recommend blanching it in salt water. You need to add quite a bit of salt, such that it tastes like seawater. This keeps plant cells from bursting and releasing pigment. You can rinse your ...


4

No, that is not normal for collards. Enlarging the picture, the discoloration looks to be a brownish-red. Those leaves look to be very old and quite possibly have been frozen (while still in the field), especially the one on the right. I would be tossing those.


4

I was able to find one study that looked at seven varieties of Rocket (Eruca sativa) also known as Arugula. Like all foods, the flavoring compounds are numerous and usually can't be reduced to just one. However, these compounds can be grouped into classes with similar molecular structures, similar biochemical profiles and presumably flavoring ...


3

Well the traditional french way would be that you add spices to eggs before cooking and stuff the omelette right before serving. I've watched a few youtube videos on the matter and I like how Jacques Pepin explains the process. Check it here. Jamie Olivers version is quite similar, he stuff omelette with cheese before he folds it. Check it here. I've ...


3

Most plant carbohydrates come from sugars, which are water soluble. Intuition tells me that if you boil the plant long enough, some of the sugars will leech into the water and you'll be able to drink it. As @SAJ14SAJ mentioned, green leafy things are usually pretty devoid of carbs, so you won't get much. Also, as always, you'll get much more of the ...


3

Assuming you're talking about ggaennip, also known as shiso, it's quite common to use it raw or salt-pickled. There are two common varieties, red and green-leafed, and to my taste there are some subtle differences between the Korean, Japanese, and maybe Vietnamese varieties. In Korea and Vietnam, ggaennip is frequently used to wrap foods (ssam bap, for ...


3

According to a number of sources, the shoots are indeed edible, however all references I found were to "young" shoots, so I don't know about the mature vine itself. The Curious Gardener says It's not just the melon that is edible on this plant; the flowers, leaves, shoots and seeds are also eaten. Although the flowers, leaves and shoots are mostly ...


3

I general any recipe that uses non precise words like a "handful", is either not a well tested recipe, or the author is suggesting to use the ingredient for taste, colour, and/or texture reasons. The amount (within reason) is not critical to the recipe Just add the amount you would like in terms of a balanced meal, and what gives the taste, colour, and/or ...


3

Adding frozen stuff directly to a slow cooker drops the temperature of the whole pot, which takes some time to recover. I don't often use peas in mine but I've never had a problem with them if I pour boiling water over them and wait a few minutes before draining them and stirring them in, when the rest of the dish is finished.


2

I've only heard of massaging kale. If you rub the greens together they get softer, darker and more tender and useable in a salad. Never done it with anything else. Wilted is steamed or blanched greens. Wilting definitely changes the texture and can make the greens more palatable and less bitter. I won't eat raw collards. I also always salt and squeeze my ...


2

The outer leaves would be a better substitute for kale. My reasoning is that the kale plant is fully exposed to light. With the cabbage only the outer leaves get to enjoy the sun, thus the greenness. I would say flavour wise the outer leaves come closer to kale too. The cabbage core tends to be sweeter.


2

This picture is from a menu online. Does this look like what you are trying to make? If so, I think you're right, they're just blanched and stir-fried with garlic. Be sure you're salting the blanching water, shock them in ice water and allow them to thoroughly drain. Mince a couple of cloves of garlic, stir-fry the garlic for several seconds in a small ...


2

I accepted JoshieSimmons' answer because my experimentation backed it up. Upon further research I also dug up the suggestions of adding baking soda (actually dulling the colors), adding olive oil to the blanching water (didn't seem to make any difference), and I saw more references to adding salt to the water. I didn't bother experimenting with adding acid, ...


1

I've been staying at a hotel where they offer made-to-order omelets during breakfast. The omelet maker uses your method #1. Note these are American-style folded omelets. Add some (melted) butter to the pan. Add filling ingredients, including whole spinach leaves, but not something like cheese. Let everything fry for several seconds. Add the egg and allow to ...


1

I too have been looking for the recipe for string beans from din tai fung and although I haven't found the exact recipe, I figured more than half the battle was getting the right texture for the beans. Alas, I came across this blog which most closely resembles what we're looking for: http://userealbutter.com/2011/06/20/chinese-dry-cooked-string-beans-recipe/...


1

I don't know how to solve it once it's happened, but it's caused by the high speed of your blender. I use an Oster blender and never have froth in my green smoothies, so maybe trying a different blender will prevent it. If you juice greens they get frothy, so it's not the fibre NOT breaking down - maybe the opposite. Pulsing the blender a few times at the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible