49

My response to this kind of question is always just ask, and if you absolutely can't, err on the side of caution. I'm assuming here that you're talking about a pretty thorough heating and brushing. If you're leaving a bunch of meat stuff on the grill, that someone could conceivably taste, that's not good - you certainly shouldn't be risking food that ...


30

Depends on the person but typically... no. I'm not sure how bad cross contamination is in terms of food safety, but grills are high heat, though you might not always heat the food through. Many observant vegetarians however would minimally prefer separate dedicated utensils and cooking surfaces not used for meat. I personally wouldn't eat it, as a ...


28

While I suspect that the formula is mostly reliable if you repeat the experiment with the same person, I found the individual heat sensitivity varies a lot. Most professional cooks and seasoned homemakers can handle (pun intended) higher heat than those who rarely expose their hands to high temperatures. In our home, we’ve had heated discussions about ...


21

From a food safety point of view, no. There is no danger, because the meat contains no pathogens after overcooking. From a "healthy living" point of view, it might be a problem, because you can have created carcinogens by charring. But we don't discuss such topics here, because nobody in the world knows how much eating charred meat contributes to the risk ...


20

Here's a couple of hints: Learn to judge doneness by feel. See this answer for a good guide to temp by feel. Learn to judge grill temp by hand. Hold your hand palm down about 3-4 inches above the grill. If you can hold it there for a second or two, it's hot; 3-4 seconds is medium; 5-6 seconds is low. Sear first. Start with a very hot grill. You want about ...


19

Another consideration is that some apartment complexes have restrictions on what type of grills can be used because of fire hazards. Where we lived many years ago we were not allowed to use charcoal or gas. So, there are a couple of options. First would be a smaller than full size electric grill. There are many available in different shapes and sizes. Some ...


16

Using a cut of meat without too much connective tissue will definitely help. Talk to your butcher about good options. Stew meat isn't the best choice; it contains a lot of connective tissue which breaks down during the long, slow stewing process. Grilling is too hot and quick to break down that tissue. If you do grill stew meat, lower temperature and longer ...


16

If you don't fancy cooking in aluminium foil (kind of takes the point away), you need to make sure you have a super clean, extremely hot grill. Why? Clean (No tasty burnt fat from the burgers), flesh sticks like #### to a blanket. You can get away with it when cooking steaks because they are just so much stronger. So get a wire brush and clean an area for ...


15

Whether or not charcoal tastes different/better is actually a bit of a debate. I've been a propane griller for years and now I use charcoal not for the taste, but because frankly, I like to play with fire. But lets assume that there is a taste difference, identify where the differences comes from, and how to address them: The smoke from charcoal. This is ...


15

Butterflying a hot dog (or any similar sausage) has two effects. First, as the moisture inside the hot dog expands during cooking, causing the casings to frequently burst due to the pressure that builds up. When you butterfly a hot dog the this is prevented. Such blistering does not 'harm' the hot dog but are somewhat 'unsightly', so I would call this an ...


15

Use aluminum foil or even non-stick aluminum foil directly on the grate. You can use a fork to punch holes in it so that you get optimal smoke circulation if you like. The fish won't stick and clean-up is a breeze.


14

A grill basket perhaps? I've no luck finding the term for your specific description, but that seems to be an umbrella term for utensils that basically hold something so you can more easily grill it.


14

My main concern (would have been) BPA, as most cans nowadays are coated with BPA plastics inside to protect flavor. Cooks Illustrated evaluated the BPA leeched into chicken using this method: Beer can interiors are coated with an epoxy that contains Bisphenol A (BPA). Is the popular method of cooking a chicken perched on an open beer can really a ...


13

Rust, or iron oxide, is not poisonous, unless consumed in large amounts. Thus it is relatively safe to grill on your barbeque. What about the people who get cut by rusty nails and get lockjaw? That's not due to the rust, but rather, due to the bacteria on the rust, which is called, Clostridium tetani, which is found in the soil, and presumably, the nails ...


13

Imagine if someone grilled a cat or dog, and then rinsed the grill surface to cook your burger. Would you be happy? This is how you have to think about it. I am not vegan or vegetarian but used to live with someone who is. I always used separate pots and pans and utensils. Don't recall ever having a cook out or how I handled that. You can designate one of ...


12

Stoves aren't grills. They're not meant to have food in contact with them. If you're doing something like warming a tortilla above it that's fine, but as soon as you mention things dripping into the flame that's a red flag, especially if it's fat. You really don't want to start a grease fire, especially one that's down in the burner. A couple alternatives: ...


10

As a fellow Webber'er and long time griller, I'm going to wager one of three things going on here: Your coals aren't hot enough. One of the biggest problems I see with folks and charcoal grills isn't waiting long enough for the coals. There's should be no visible flame and slightly more than half of the coals should be white. In a chimney starter - this ...


10

There are several studies linking foods cooked at high temperatures, and especially charred foods, to an increased risk of cancer. So far these studies have only been conducted on animals, so there is no conclusive proof that it has the same effect on humans, but as humans are animals, it would seem at least possible. The National Cancer Institute has a ...


10

Using an air fryer without oil is essentially the same thing as using a convection oven. This would make it no more and no less fatty than baking. If you use oil in the air fryer then my understanding is that you are being marginally less fatty than deep frying because the saturation in oil is just not as significant. Incidentally your use of oil in a ...


9

To make a perfect burger in the kitchen, a hot cast-iron skillet is your best friend. To keep from making a mess, use one of these: That's a splatter screen. It allows air to move freely, but keeps grease in the pan and off of your walls. EDIT: In comments, Cindy Askew recommended the above plus using the cheapest available aluminum foil to protect ...


9

This is the method I use to smoke meat in my Weber! The basics are exactly what you see in the photo, with one more step. Start about a dozen (or in a 22.5" grill like that one, maybe 18-24) briquettes in your charcoal starter (you have one of those right? if not, go get one, they're awesome). When the coals in your starter are glowing, carefully place them ...


9

What you have is rust. You'll want to strip the grates down and re-season them I've had mixed-luck over the years with cast iron grates on gas grills -- yes, they cook things really well, but if you leave the burners on high to burn off any food bits left on the grates after cooking, you'll risk burning off the seasoning ... which then leads to rusting.


9

Generally speaking, this is why people buy gas grills, which are not for indoor use, because open flame cooking inside is messy, smoky, and dangerous. If you really want to apply flame directly to meat inside your house, I'd suggest buying a propane torch and a flame spreader or diffuser and cooking small pieces at a time. These kinds of torches are often ...


9

There is a huge variety of motivations and feelings involved in the choice to not eat meat. If you're serving a large group, it would be best to choose the safest option and use separate surfaces and implements. However, if just serving some close friends, it may be worth asking them if this is suitable, assuming you are confident this question will not ...


8

Make sure you don't squirt the fluid all over the grill. Keep it on the charcoal. If you have to apply more fluid after you've lit it, you're doing it wrong. Douse the charcoal then wait a few minutes for it to soak in. This is a common mistake. People often pour on the fluid and immediately light it. It then burns away before the charcoal can ignite ...


8

Umami comes from natural glutamates. Two excellent vegan sources of umami are tomato paste and dried shiitake mushrooms (rehydrate then mince). Fresh shiitake aren't nearly so high in glutamates. They are available very inexpensively at Asian groceries. If you want vegetarian, but not vegan and can find a rennet-free parmesan-style cheese, they are also ...


8

If you're putting your wood chips directly on a fire, it's good to soak them (and that means real soaking--a few days--not an hour or two). This prevents the wood chips from actually catching fire, which can cause off flavors from combustion chemicals settling back on your food. Tastes kinda like a brand new telephone pole smells on a hot day. Tar/Creosote, ...


8

A decent grill. Yes, really. If your park has one of those crappy little close-to-the-ground ones (instead of the great giant cast-iron ones in the national parks) you're in for an afternoon of heartbreak and frustration as you try to grill on it. Quality charcoal. Hardwood is more expensive, harder to light, slower to heat up but burns hotter and tastes ...


8

Charcoal can get to 700 degrees F but in normal use you're more likely to be in the 500F range. In order to get to the higher end of charcoal's abilities there are a couple things you can do: Use natural lump charcoal, not briquettes. Lower the grill grate to within 1" of the hot coals If 1&2 don't get you enough heat, consider using the Alton Brown ...


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