20

To directly answer your question - you slice it for presentation. Entrecôte should be cooked at as high a temperature as you can achieve. This will tend towards charring the outside before the inside is cooked. As you should serve it towards medium rather than rare because of the fat content, you want to avoid over-cooking by doing it too slowly. You are ...


6

One point is presentation as has already been covered by another answer. Another is to cut the muscle fibers shorter if possible. Muscle fibers are generally tough, and so if you cut them into shorter parts the meat will feel more tender to chew. A premium piece of steak will already have the fibers short, ie. along the shortest dimension like so ||||||||||||...


5

There are electric smokers available. Whether a particular electric grill is suitable depends on the grill, but I don't think there is a reason not to try an aluminium foil pouch of wood chips on it. In fact, here is a site describing how to use an electric grill for that purpose.


4

No, as that isn’t creating smoke. It’s creating steam. A steamier cooking environment may actually inhibit desired grilling flavors as it could inhibit browning via the Maillard reaction.


4

I suspect what's happening is that you've depleted your fuel, charcoal's just wood at the end of the day, and after an hour or so it will have a lot less to give. If you want a hotter flame you can: Scrape the remaining coals together to concentrate the heat, this will give you high heat in say half your grill Replenish your fuel: there's two ways you can ...


3

First, it shouldn't take "hours"; make certain not to over cook your chicken. You should spatchcock your chicken so that it cooks more evenly. Using a chimney to prepare briquettes is a good idea, just be certain you have a safe place to keep and store burning briquettes, if you don't use them all. I'd add a few briquettes at a time to keep the ...


2

If your barbecue has a lid and you can control the airflow then you do not need to add fuel when you are cooking a chicken as if you close the valves you will reduce the oxygen going to your coals and they will burn slower. Get the charcoal lit in your chimney starter and then pour it onto one half of the barbecue, leaving an area where you can cook the ...


2

Do not do this. You will rapidly cool and may even extinguish your fire. This will also cause ash and cooler, more astringent, elements of smoke to land on your food. The results will be very unpleasant. If you want your meat more smokey, you just need to apply the appropriate techniques for smoking. Grilling imparts some smoke flavor, but that is ...


1

The "smokey" taste does not actually come from the charcoal - it is produced when the juices from your food drip onto the charcoal, turning into highly fragrant compounds that then waft up with the smoke and stick to your food. So no, just adding water to the charcoal wouldn't help reproduce the "smokey" taste.


1

I also have the exact same model and the same issue. I'm sure that it's an oxidation layer that is likely caused by the dishwasher detergents. It's however not preventable as its an unwanted side effect of this particular kind of aluminum alloy. I had some pots that exhibited the exact same problem. I got rid of them all because they drove me crazy. I paid ...


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