73

Applying USDA standards (which may or may not be the 'same' as elsewhere, but (IMHO) serve as a reasonable standard for "Safe") Hamburger must be cooked to an internal temperature of 160°F [71°C] in order to be 'Guaranteed Safe', which is typically defined as 'well done'. On the other hand hamburger may be perfectly safe at medium rare to rare (120°F - 49°...


27

Depends on the meat-grinding process. Is it some large production facility where scraps and sub-standard meat portions are thrown into a vat and ground up, with a lot of opportunity for contamination (eventually being sold in large plastic tubes as cheap frozen ground beef)? Lots of danger there. Your local butcher shop, done by hand on equipment that is ...


26

Use a bigger pan...or much less beef in the pan. Stop stirring. If you over crowd the pan, nothing will brown. It will steam, then braise because the water can't evaporate fast enough. Secondly, browning happens when an item remains in contact with the pan. So, stirring (unless you are using very high, wok-type temperature) will only defeat the ...


25

When you buy a burger from a fast food restaurant you are buying a product that has been engineered to provide absolute consistency, be very fast to cook, and be as cheap as possible so it can be offered at a low price for a reasonable profit. The grill marks are engineered in, and they are given coatings which will give the right appearance when cooked. ...


17

Are you asking if it is safe for you to prepare it this way, or whether it is safe to have it at a restaurant? Here's a useful guideline for restaurants, as a complement to other answers: Is this way of cooking common and accepted in that region? Is it how the chef and the waiter would prefer that burger? In France, the answer is yes. In many places you ...


16

It is absolutely worth adding ground pork or veal. I usually use a leaner ground steak and compensate with a fatty ground pork (shoulder is good) - fat = flavour. Another tip is to take your time. Many people try and cook bolognese in half an hour, but considering ground meat is usually made with tougher cuts, you end up with tough meat and under-developed ...


15

There is a common misconception that you should absolutely never cook meat from frozen or near-frozen. This is incorrect. I would also not recommended putting any meat on a low heat to thaw it out - you are asking for tough meat at best and food poisoning at worst. The aim when cooking meat is to bring the internal temperature up to a safe level for a ...


13

It's fine to freeze, no need to cook if you don't want to; just be sure to use it immediately after thawing. Freezing things essentially stops the clock: food will stay just as safe to eat no matter how long it's frozen. It can deteriorate but it's more about drying out (freezer burn), taking on odors, and so on, not safety. So since it's safe right now, it'...


11

Well, all I can say is 'it depends on the dish'. If the dish calls for fat to be added otherwise, you can keep that fat and count it where you would add some later. If the dish is just adding hamburger and no more fat - I agree, discard it. That said - I don't find hamburger fat particularly flavorful and nearly always strain it and add another kind of ...


10

Brown meat tastes good - Anne Burrell Of course you know this, the browning of the meat is a result of the Maillard Reaction, if you are not getting this result you are probably not cooking at a high enough temperature. Temperatures need to be high to bring about the Maillard reaction, but as long as the food is very wet, its temperature won’t climb ...


10

I will disagree with the other answer for one simple reason -- the fewer steps taken en masse, the lower the risk. Now of course, this assumes that you're correctly cleaning your grinder, but because you're only grinding one chunk, or maybe a few chunks of meat, you only have to worry if those chunks of meat had contamination. For a larger operation, every ...


9

I cut the top of a soda can off, use a grease screen over the beef and drain it into the can. Let it sit and it will harden so you can throw it away. Grease in the sink is very bad for your pipes.


8

In the US, hamburgers are usually flat patties weighing somewhere between 3 and 8oz. and typically 100% ground beef. Many variations are possible, including mixing spices and other ingredients into the meat, but binders such as egg and breadcrumbs are not common. The defining characteristics of a proper hamburger for most Americans are the shape (flat), ...


8

From Freezing and Food Safety published by the United States Department of Agriculture: Is Frozen Food Safe? Food stored constantly at 0 °F (-18 °C) will always be safe. Only the quality suffers with lengthy freezer storage. Freezing keeps food safe by slowing the movement of molecules, causing microbes to enter a dormant stage. Freezing preserves food for ...


8

Fry the mince in a saucepan big enough to hold the sauce until it's brown all over, add the sauce and simmer for an hour or two. Mince is usually made from cheap cuts of meat. This means, while it will technically be cooked after a few minutes, it will also be tough and chewy. Browning it in the pan then simmering it slowly in the sauce will result in nice ...


8

If you're at a nicer restaurant - or nowadays even a midlevel restaurant, perhaps - you may be eating food that was cooked sous-vide. Sous-vide is helpful not only for letting the restaurant pre-prepare food without a loss of quality, but it allows substantially more rare preparation with no additional risk of foodborne illness. While a 160°F/71°C ...


8

No, it doesn't matter who makes the ground beef. The previous "outside" contaiminates all exposed surfaces in the grinder. So you get no "free pass" for grinding it yourself. It is also not related to the cut of beef. They are all exposed to the same environment in the butcher shop, sluiced with the same water, etc., and they are all at the same level of ...


7

There are two different issues: safety, and flavor. From a safety point of view, assuming you don't overload your slow cooker, and it comes up to safe temperatures (140 F, 60 C) in less than two hours (preferably much less), it is perfectly safe to begin cooking in a slow cooker with raw ground meat. On the other hand, you will not get the flavor ...


7

You'll have different techniques for different recipes. The most important thing is not to overcook it ... but with ground meat and ground poultry in particulary, you want to make sure you've cooked it long enough to be safe. For amalgameats, like meatloaf and meatballs, the common technique is a panade, breadcrumbs soaked in milk, and adding vegetables ...


7

The main thing that wagyu is supposed to get you is dense marbling. That's especially important for cuts low in fat, like the filet and the sirloin. That is, steaks. The rest of the cow has to go somewhere. The parts that get ground into burgers on conventional cows might as well go into "Kobe sliders". There will be some differences from conventionally-...


6

You answered your own question. Add cold water and break up the clumps with your hands. My Italian grandfather used this method for his meat sauce. I also see hot dog stands use the same technique to make their chili sauce. So long as you don't boil all of the liquid away the meat will not clump.


6

Store them as you would the unground beef. If it will be still be in date after a few days, store it in the fridge, otherwise, freeze them (separating the patties with a sheet of greaseproof paper).


6

"The FSA has now created and published a list of establishments approved to supply minced meat and meat preparations (rare burgers) intended to be eaten less than thoroughly cooked. " From March 2017 The Food Standards Agency has introduced a specific requirement for establishments supplying minced meat (MM) and/or meat preparations (MP) intended to ...


6

There are several phases meat goes through when simmering - a better-educated chef than myself could probably give them all names, but with no formal education, this is what I've noticed over the years. If you're going to cook mince for a long time in a sauce, you'll not be interested in the first one - that's more for a burger. When first fried until a ...


6

If you get a lot of liquid from the meat, whether water or fat, removing some of it helps (spoon or pour). You don't need to add much fat to start with, just enough to stop it sticking. Cooking it in two batches can help (as can a bigger pan but only if you've got one and can deliver enough heat to it). I found that quickly breaking it up as soon as it was ...


5

In the British tv series "In Search of Perfection" with Heston Blumenthal, Heston visits a chef in Italy that makes ragu bolognese with whole pieces of meat that are braised and then shredded. He comes up with a combination of pork and beef cut into larger chunks and cooked for a very long time instead of using ground meat. You might want to try a similar ...


5

Obviously hard to know for sure. The laws and guidelines dictate use of food grade equipment so if a piece falls off and ingested, it does little harm. If you cooked it, then you have even less to worry. As a precaution, I suggest taking it to the store and asking about it so other customers don't trip on the same issue. Harmless or otherwise. If they don'...


5

To help get uniformly broken up ground beef: Choose an at least moderately fatty (say 80-85%) grind, as very lean ground beef will tend to stick to itself more. Don't compress it when you are bringing it home, as by setting other groceries on top. Don't salt the meat before cooking, as salt tends to help it bind to itself. Break it up into chunks with your ...


5

Ground beef does not work well in any traditional stir-fry or soupy dish, though there are probably one or two that actually call for it But it does work well, and is actually used in China for stuffed items. Some deep fried or steamed pastry rolls ("dim sum") or steamed buns have some ground beef in the filling In my experience it was a very coarse grind, ...


5

it will be cooked when it reaches the internal temperature corresponding to the "done" temperature of whatever meat you are using. From the US food Safety Chart: Category................................................Food.........................Temperature (°F) Ground Meat & Meat Mixtures......Beef, Pork, Veal, Lamb.............160 Ground Meat & ...


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