37

You did everything right except you overcooked your burgers. Those are relatively thin patties, they won't take 7 minutes a side on high heat, that is what caused that hard crust. I'd be cooking them 3 minutes a side at most. A small thing but I'd suggest you replace olive oil with corn, sunflower or another high temperature oil. Olive oil will smoke at a ...


26

Use a bigger pan...or much less beef in the pan. Stop stirring. If you over crowd the pan, nothing will brown. It will steam, then braise because the water can't evaporate fast enough. Secondly, browning happens when an item remains in contact with the pan. So, stirring (unless you are using very high, wok-type temperature) will only defeat the ...


6

If you get a lot of liquid from the meat, whether water or fat, removing some of it helps (spoon or pour). You don't need to add much fat to start with, just enough to stop it sticking. Cooking it in two batches can help (as can a bigger pan but only if you've got one and can deliver enough heat to it). I found that quickly breaking it up as soon as it was ...


4

I use only 5% fat beef - which I would assume would be considered 95% lean, though the UK doesn't measure it that way. I cannot abide fatty meat, but that's a topic for another day ;) For me, a burger is 500g beef mince, an onion, either finely diced, or pre-fried [different flavour profile], 1 egg, a good handful of breadcrumbs [somewhere between 1 & 2 ...


3

So if you aren't concerned with cooking the meat until it's well done, you can continue with your current approach and evaporate all the water off, and then at that point turn the heat down to low or med-low and then let the beef sit in contact with the pan for a while to brown, then stir/flip it over. You can do this for as long as you want, eventually the ...


3

They do count that, yes. Food safety regulations are targeted towards the worst case scenario. If the meat in question is old enough that the store is about to throw it away, and the store's refrigerator wasn't quite as cold as it was supposed to be, and it sat in a hot car on the way home, and your refrigerator is not quite cold enough either, then 1-2 days ...


3

When I do ground beef I usually add the ground beef in the shape it arrives where I am (slightly prismatic block). If I got it at the butcher's as a "pile" - I'll manipulate it slightly into something prismatic-like. I make sure to - on an experience basis - not add too much at once - I'll cut it in half and do it twice if I consider the total amount of beef ...


3

Well, traditionally Chinese (I mean ethnic Chinese not Chinese nationality) doesn't eat beef. That why it is uncommon to see beef as ingredients in Chinese recipes. A lot of traditional Chinese recipe that do use beef are because of the influences from the Mongolian.


2

I actually saw a video on this recently. The reason that a lot of times ground beef doesn't get that browned look is because people take it out too early. You're supposed to let it cook until all the water has evaporated, then keep frying.


2

I haven't cooked beef for a while, but a wooden spatula works very well, as it can break up clumps and is safe for non stick. I prefer the straight shape of the one I've got to any of my nylon spatulas, that are more designed for lifting. The second implement matters less, but I may use a slotted nylon spoon so it's ready to lift the meat out of the fat, or ...


2

Don't put them in the oven. There's no baking supposed to be going on. You're pan-frying the meat. Heat the grill pan to moderately hot. You'll want to see grill marks in the finished patties. You're not making meatballs here. Do not put a ball in the grill pan and smash it down into a patty. You'll want to avoid handling the patties as much as ...


1

There was some more of the same minced meat. I did a few trials yesterday to try the comments here. I used both iron grill and granite pan. And in my experiment with a granite pan, I was able to observe the reason better. First of all, I did not apply any olive oil to the patties. When I put the hamburger patty in the pan that I had preheated, a serious oil ...


1

While "ideal" is somewhat subjective, there is a tool designed for this purpose, a "meat masher" or "meat chopper" (names vary). This is a tool resembling a nylon spatula, but with a cross or star of blades aligned with the handle rather than a single blade angled off the end. The tool is used by pressing and twisting it vertically into the ground meat (or ...


1

No, use whatever tool you have on hand that works. If you use a teflon (or other non-stick) pan, maybe try to use something that will not scratch the surface. Anecdotal, I've used everything, wood, silicon, metal, "plastic" , wood thingies (like the epicurean kitchen tools)


1

The texture of beef patties (hamburgers) is greatly influenced by the way they are formed and the ingredients added. It sounds like you are creating a sort of meatball, and then flattening into a patty. This compresses the meat a great deal, and makes the whole lump much stickier. In addition, and perhaps more importantly, the salt you are adding to the ...


1

Increasing the fat content of the ground beef is the easiest way to improve the flavor and texture, but you mention you're on a low-fat diet. In that case, I have a few suggestions: Cook to an internal temperature of at least 135°F. According to https://www.reluctantgourmet.com/meat-doneness-chart/, 135°F is medium-rare; 120°F is rare. Note that the USDA ...


1

Here's my method. First, rub a well-seasoned cast iron pan with a light coat of oil and heat until the oil is just starting to smoke (400+ºF/204+ºC). Outside of the pan, break the ground beef up into large meatball size pieces, around 2 inches (5 cm) in diameter. Cook only a couple of these meatballs in the pan at a time. For instance, in my 10 inch cast ...


1

I'm a carnivore who eats 2 lbs of beef a day. As someone who started consuming wagyu ground beef (sourced here) on daily basis, I can confirm that there is a huge difference in the taste compared to conventional ground beef. Marbling is not the only factor. Remember that much of the meat flavour is in the fat.


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