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15

You don't have to thicken things with a roux, and a roux doesn't have to be made with oil. A French roux is made with butter (this is how I usually make it). Other options for thickening include a slurry (flour well mixed with cold water or milk), corn starch (also mixed with cold water first), a Beurre Manié (a paste of butter and flour), or depending ...


15

I wouldn't recommend it. Dark roux is actually a pretty weak thickener compared to a light roux. As you get darker, it's more of a flavoring. Flour on its own gives an obvious raw flour taste. As an alternate method to make darker rouxes, search for 'oven roux', where you're working with a more easily controlled, even heat, as opposed to something that ...


15

Making a roux has two purposes: Coat the flour granules with fat so they are able to dissolve into the cooking liquid without binding up. Cook the flour to remove the raw cereal flavor. When the cooked, fat-covered, flour is introduced to boiling liquid the starch granules swell and explode tangling up the cooking liquid. The cooking liquid is thus ...


13

Yep, that'll be fine. For other purposes, it might not be your favorite - sometimes it can get a little more of the "slimy" coating that people don't like - but since you're cooking it in gumbo, it's all just going to get taken up into the stew (where it'll provide some thickening, as intended), so no worries. A little more, if you're curious: okra contains ...


11

I was born and raised in the heart of Cajun country. My entire family loves gumbo, especially my moms. This is what I learned: get the roux as dark as possible without burning it (that makes the best gumbo). I think that's what happened to yours; you probably got it just right. Then you add the other ingredients so that it mellows down the bitter taste. ...


8

I'm guessing that you were tasting a deep, concentrated char the first time, just shy of burnt (most likely in the roux itself). The simmering afterwards mellowed it, giving you the perfect (you may never duplicate it) level of caramelization in the final gumbo.


8

Once you've boiled the carcass, most of the juices, fats, etc. have been released. Trying to do a second pass will result in a much weaker stock. There's only so much that can be released, and it's already happened on the first pass. You should just choose one thing to make, or buy a second chicken, I'm afraid.


7

I can think of a couple answers here: The larger volume of soup in the pot stayed hot much longer than in tupperware, and so it continued to cook, or fermented/spoiled overnight. If the pot was aluminum and the gumbo acidic, the two reacted. I've seen this happen with long-simmered, acidic stocks. The color changes, and the flavor sometimes does too.


5

I cook gumbo all the time. I usually cook large gumbo for parties.. 30 quarts or greater at a time. I can tell you from experience exactly what is happening... And one of the answers above is right on. Your roux is not mixing due to a temperature issue. I ALWAYS use 2 pots when making a gumbo... No matter what kind of gumbo it is. I use a cast iron ...


5

Gumbo is a stew/soup, etouffee involves a roux to make it more of a sauce served over rice as a vehicle, and jambalaya is a one-pot meal with rice as an integral part of the dish--sort of like a cajun paella. All three tend to have shellfish where as gumbo and jambalaya tend to also have sausage (etouffee usually doesn't have sausage that I've seen).


4

When you make your roux, the slurry of flour and hot oil (lard tastes better) does not have to done at an extremely hot temperature. Just make sure you have the flour and oil/lard mixed well before adding other liquids -- for a good gumbo you'll want to use about a cup of coffee (black, and preferably with chicory - Café Du Monde, or my favorite Community ...


3

I have made Gumbo with rice flour. Seemed like it took a little longer to get a nice chocolate roux, but otherwise no change in recipe or technique. In my case it was a chicken-and-andouille gumbo, but I would not hesitate to do the same with a seafood gumbo if a similar occasion (party with a known guest with Celiac disease) arose.


3

You might try doing the roux and chicken stock in a separate pan. Make the roux, and when it starts to turn golden (or dark brown - your choice), pour in a cup of stock and whisk continuously while adding. This will make a gravy like substance, to which you can add the rest of the stock to thin out to the correct consistency. There's really no reason to ...


2

I've had my roux separate on more that one occasion and the cause I found was in the technique of adding cold stock to a hot roux, you have to temper your roux with the colder stock a little at a time, or you will end up shocking the oil and flour and the roux will separate from the stock liquid. I found the remedy to this; Oh shet moment on a Cajun cooking ...


2

I usually have this same problem when I make a really big batch of gumbo. I've tried all of the usual stuff: adding cold stock to hot roux, hot stock to cold roux, doing an extra vigorous boil. None of it worked. I've come to believe the adding cold to hot trick is old kitchen lore that has no scientific foundation. To settle this, I read some academic ...


2

Strain out the solids and set them aside. Then, hit the liquid with a stick blender. You may also want to add a bit beurre manie or a bit of light roux if that doesn't work.


2

As for working, they will certainly work. A cook can learn to use pots with irregular heating patterns. The bigger problem is, can you work with large pots? If no, then your plan won't work, independently of the pot thickness you choose. A pot of this size just doesn't behave like a small pot. It will have a heat gradient vertically, and, unless you have a ...


2

My guess is you burned the roux without realizing it. Rouxs should not be cooked on high heat; medium is best. You don't want to rush it. Here is a link about roux. You can also google the Alton Brown episode where he talks about roux. He has a method for cooking it in the oven to whatever shade you desire, with little to no chance of burning. Like ...


1

The origin of the word ‘gumbo’ is okra. I don’t remember the whole story, but Gumbo IS okra soup. Jambalaya is a rice dish. Creole is a tomato based dish. I think the most important thing is that these dishes are rustic and can have almost ANYTHING in them from expensive cuts of protein to straight up vegetables. All are spicy but not necessarily ‘hot’.


1

I like the aluminum cored stainless better than bare aluminum. Lots of ingredients react with aluminum that can distinctly affect color and taste of food.


1

How can I fix the slimey texture. Okra produces slime because the Okra plant and its fruit contain nasty stuff called mucilage. When you apply heat to the Gumbo, the slime comes out. But there are a few techniques for reducing all that sliminess, namely pan frying or grilling prior to adding it to the Gumbo.


1

when you added the trinity to the roux, you probably just overcooked the garlic, or could have gotten some of the garlic's germ in the mix (both leave bitter aftertastes). Simmering anything naturally mellows sharp flavors, as it gives the flavors time to marry and intermingle - that's the reason a lot of tomato based sauces are simmered slowly. trust me, ...


1

For anyone who reads this, it was my first time making a roux today and it tasted great. I set it aside as I began working on the rest of the base for my seafood gumbo, and as I combined the roux I noticed it had thickened on the bottom but the roux itself did not taste torched. As the flavors began to develop, the burned taste was noticable, but as it ...


1

How long did the garlic cook before adding the liquid? Cooking garlic more than a few seconds can result in a bitter taste. About 30 seconds is the max I use.


1

Being raised in a cajun kitchen, roux was the first thing we learned to make from my mommom.I would say it could not have been burned and taste good.Roux that is really burned is awful,bitter to taste.We always cook roux on low heat.It takes longer but is worth it.


1

Although I am not from Louisiana, I have made gumbo dozens of time and live in the New Orleans area, I had my roux separate twice. Tonight was the second time. I found a fix on another web page. I used Xanthan gum which is an emulsifier. It bonded the roux to the stock. However I used too much and now my gumbo is extra thick. Make a slurry with it first ...


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