Hot answers tagged

27

Nope, Jamon Serrano should not smell bad. It can be normal for it to have mold on the very outer surface, which is generally harmless and can just be scrubbed off, but a foul smell means that there is something wrong. I'm afraid your ham is trash.


21

These are two different ways to preserve food. The canned salmon was boiled and then sealed into a can while it was still boiling sealed into a can and boiled under a specified combination of time and temperature that has been empirically proven to kill enough bacteria. All the bacteria in the can are dead, and no more can get in, so it's sterile and won't ...


20

Microbiologist here. That meat is clearly spoiled, please don't eat it. While you could clean the mold off the outside, the discoloration and smell suggests that other microbes are at work too. Save yourself the intestinal pain and just toss it out.


18

As others have said, your jamon is almost certainly spoiled.However, I wouldn't throw it out just yet. I assume you bought this jamon recently, or at least close enough to this moment that it hasn't turned spoiled while in your possession. If this is the case, it was likely already spoiled while in the store, which means the store essentially sold you a ...


13

Canned salmon is sterilized. Sterilization uses heat to render a product safe. Cured hams are preserved with salt, and nitrites in some cases. Some hams are also cooked. Furthermore, some fish is salted and dried for curing purposes. Salt and drying greatly reduce water activity to render a product safe. Two different processes, both create a safe product.


11

I posted this question in a hurry (because as you can imagine), there was a lot of anxiety concerning whether it was safe to have dinner or not. It turns out that this ham is not safe; I will quote the USDA: The plastic bone guard covering the exposed bone is used to keep the bone from breaking the outer wrap. If left on the meat during cooking, a ...


11

I fully endorse the "when in doubt, throw it out" doctrine, although I personally wouldn't consider a sweet taste to be doubt. As rfusca wisely points out, you can't taste or smell several kinds of contamination, and the ones that you can taste or smell, are usually sour, bitter, or generally pungent. I suggest you have a look at the following question: Is ...


10

This is a ham right? Not a bone-in cooked pork butt, but an actual cured ham? This falls into the category I like to call "Things I personally would eat, but wouldn't feed to anyone else." Chances are it's fine. 80 years ago they'd have thought nothing of it, but in our modern bacteria-obsessed culture, a few hours sitting on the counter is certain death. ...


9

Perfectly safe. From the Henning's Market FAQ: The shiny, greenish, rainbow like color on sliced ham is a sign of oxidation that occurs when the meat is exposed to the metal on a knife or slicer. The nitrate-modified iron content of the meat undergoes a chemical change that alters the hams pigmentation. This effect can also be seen in sliced beef, such ...


8

Only for your information. The spanish ham can get moldy every time, because the curing process will not stop. And for sure you can eat after cleaning with oil. All this ham have mould but before it is sold they also clean it with oil or fat. Mostly the customer don't see it, but sometimes because of the humidity or if it is hot it can appear again, but it ...


8

The green from the picture looks.. strange. I'd expect a brand/tattoo, but not a green spot like that. It should also not be dry and flaky. It has been cured with salt, so that may be what you're seeing. Some hams will smell weird right out of the packaging. I don't think I've experienced one as bad as you're describing, though, but it could be the mold. I ...


8

sugar. With all the effects it has in a marinade. caramel coloring. Well, it colors and caramels. acid. Both the (volatile) carbonation and the phosphoric acid (not that much of it - undiluted phosphoric acid is a potent corrosive!). Possible tenderizing effect, taste enhancer, and will influence browning reactions on the surface (probably balancing the ...


7

You need to add bulky things with no salt, so that it'll average out to a saltiness you're okay with. Although cream of mushroom soup sounds like a nice easy way to add some goopiness, it's probably pretty salty. If you can find low- or no-sodium soup, that'd be a much better choice. That kind of thing might be easier to find in fancy/organic/"healthy" ...


6

If the ham picked up anything like botulinus then the toxic waste products are not destroyed by re-cooking... so the ham would remain toxic. So the safe advice would be to throw it away. And from a self-preservation point, I can't possibly advise anything else. However, ham is full of preservatives (that's why it's ham not pork!) and it's probably safe ...


6

If you're looking for something with the glue power of a cream soup, without the same salt level, consider making a white sauce (aka. béchamel). It's a cooked mix of butter, flour and milk (possibly with some seasonings, like nutmeg or black pepper).


5

Have you tried baking pasta, after boiling it in the water? I highly recommend you bake the pasta in the oven on very low heat, for 20 minutes, then you will see that there is no more liquid. Also it gives the macaroni a spongy condition which makes it able to keep the liquid in it. I believe if you bake the pasta before mixing with mayonnaise, you ...


5

If you're going to simmer your chili for a long time, just throw it in there. If you made stock with it, you'd still be just simmering the bone for a long time to extract the same flavors. (I'm not advocating not using stock here, just that I wouldn't make stock for the sole purpose of getting flavor out of the bone. Use the stock you would otherwise.). ...


5

425° F is so hot that it will surely burn over-do the outside of a ham before the inside will get warm. However, you can slice the ham then warm it for about 10 minutes. Slicing it will allow the whole slice to get warm, while not over-cooking the outside.


5

Based on my experiences with sweet-and-sour asian dishes, I'd say good or even okay mango would work just as well, if not be an improvement. (I find canned pineapple or pineapple juice to be cloying or bland compared to fresh, and generally like mango better in savoury foods.) If you're going to puree / juice, and not eat it as-is, you can "fix" it not being ...


5

It depends on your oven and how big the hams are. If you try to cram 2 big hams into your oven and it's not a fan oven then you probably need to add extra time. If they are moderate size then it shouldn't make much difference at all. If they are big but you have a fan oven then you shouldn't need to add time. The best way to make sure something is done is ...


5

How do you know, by taste, if anything is bad? You don't, you can't. The bacteria that grow and make you sick may be odorless and tasteless. "When it doubt, throw it out."


5

Basically, Coca-Cola is flavored sugar water, and serves to create a sweet glaze on the ham. It's similar to a maple glaze, honey glaze, brown sugar glaze -- but using Coke instead of a "plain" sugar base. It's often associated with Southern US cooking; Coca-Cola is based in Atlanta GA and there's a long history of cooking ham in the "local" cola.


4

Differences are mainly a question of origin. Speck comes from Tyrol (it actually means "bacon" in german, which is misleading) and is prepared with a specific blend of spices, usually including juniper, Jamon Serrano from Spain (it means "mountain ham" in spanish) and is a dry-cured ham, and prosciutto just means "ham" in italian. There are plenty of ...


4

In Ireland boiled or glazed ham is a staple. Traditionally it's had with cut up cabbage (ideally you would cook the cabbage in the same water the ham was boiled in as this gives it lovely flavour) but you could just cut it up and pan fry it with a little butter. Normally it would be served with boiled floury potatoes. Traditionally (in Ireland) you wouldn'...


4

When I did this as a kid with my mom, we just put food dye (the same we put in the eggs) on the slices of ham. As someone who has tried this though, I have to strongly recommend you don't. While it's easy to get around the fact that the eggs you're about to eat are green, ham that's green just doesn't look right. It was a struggle to eat it even though I ...


4

The official answer is generally only a few days for meat in the fridge ... Ham can be different, as it's salt cured, so depending on the salt content can last longer without freezing it. As for freezing it, it really depends on how you plan to use it: It's most convenient to cut it up in the same way that you're going to use it, so that you can just pull ...


4

Techincally, ham is the cut of meat (the rear leg of the pig)--so what you prepared was a fresh ham roast, or just a pork roast. You happened to brine it preparation. The term ham has also come to mean the cured pork product--or now, with so-calle turkey ham and whatnot on the market, similar cured meat products. "Fresh ham" emphasizes that you have the ...


4

Pineapple brings a touch of acidity, sweetness, and general fruitiness. I am going to assume you would have been using canned pineapple, so the enzymatic action is not really a factor (and it would be stopped as part of the cooking process). It is also hearty enough in texture to stand up to the baking. For the juice, I would recommend basic orange juice, ...


4

They would be fresh hams, the hindquarter of a pig. The word ham, unmodified, implies a cured product. I would imagine that for a feral hog, if you are willing to risk eating it, that you should cook to the highest temperature reasonable, which in the case of a fresh ham might be at least 180 F, and as high as 200 F. The best application at these ranges ...


4

Jambon de Paris (Paris Ham) is a slow cooked ham. The slow cooking means it retains a large percentage of its moisture and absorbs the flavours of the ingredients with which it is cooked. Jambon de Bayonne is a dry cured or smoked ham that may or may not be further cured in red wine and given its name from the region in which it originates. Both are ...


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