73

Applying USDA standards (which may or may not be the 'same' as elsewhere, but (IMHO) serve as a reasonable standard for "Safe") Hamburger must be cooked to an internal temperature of 160°F [71°C] in order to be 'Guaranteed Safe', which is typically defined as 'well done'. On the other hand hamburger may be perfectly safe at medium rare to rare (120°F - 49°...


29

This scum is made from proteins. Meat contains muscle fibers (the proteins actin and myosin) as well as some loose proteins swimming in the fluids within the meat (the cell plasma). When you cook meat, the protein-rich fluids are expelled (that's why overcooking makes meat dry). Under hot temperature, the proteins in the fluid coagulate, making it firm. It ...


27

Depends on the meat-grinding process. Is it some large production facility where scraps and sub-standard meat portions are thrown into a vat and ground up, with a lot of opportunity for contamination (eventually being sold in large plastic tubes as cheap frozen ground beef)? Lots of danger there. Your local butcher shop, done by hand on equipment that is ...


25

When you buy a burger from a fast food restaurant you are buying a product that has been engineered to provide absolute consistency, be very fast to cook, and be as cheap as possible so it can be offered at a low price for a reasonable profit. The grill marks are engineered in, and they are given coatings which will give the right appearance when cooked. ...


17

Are you asking if it is safe for you to prepare it this way, or whether it is safe to have it at a restaurant? Here's a useful guideline for restaurants, as a complement to other answers: Is this way of cooking common and accepted in that region? Is it how the chef and the waiter would prefer that burger? In France, the answer is yes. In many places you ...


15

The right way is simple and straightforward: preheat the skillet for about 5-10 minutes on medium, add a few table spoons of oil to coat the bottom, and continue cooking at this temperature. Flip regularly, to allow the sides to cook evenly, and wait for the middle to become fully cooked. Now I will tell you all the ways NOT to cook a hamburger with a ...


14

Yes, it can change the taste quite significantly. Here's an easy experiment that you can do: Make a sandwich, but spread mustard on only one of the pieces of bread. Take a bite of the sandwich, mustard-side up. Take a bite of the sandwich, mustard-side down. Mouth feel is affected as well, but not quite as dramatically.


14

Beef has a firm, closed texture, which prevents bacteria penetrating far into the meat. This is why it's relatively safe to eat a rare steak: you kill the surface bacteria by searing it, and the middle is relatively bacteria free. When you grind beef, you of course mix the surface with the middle, which increases the risk. To be safe, you should therefore ...


13

You're right with your assumption that surface bacteria should to be killed and by the process of grinding meat the surfaces bateria mixes into the interior. BUT: There is also steak tartare which is basically minced beef consumed raw. The trick is to get the meat from a trustworthy source, store it at low temperatures, process it in an environment which is ...


12

Have you tried not adding egg? In my experiments, egg is needed when you add breadcrumbs, but if you just form some ground beef into a patty and fry it, it doesn't fall apart. Hm, let me clarify that. If you take a single blob of ground beef straight from the styrofoam and press it in a patty press, it doesn't fall apart. If you take two pieces and put them ...


12

The stretch and fold method is great for making breads, but most buns like this are made using something closer to the Chorleywood Process (or No Time method). Instead of resting time with stretches and folds and bulk fermentation time, this method relies on combinations of dough conditioners and heavy mechanical mixing. This usually means that the dough is ...


11

A bit of corn starch would help if you cannot add egg at all.


11

I often use this technique at home to cook proteins. It shortens cooking time by using steam as a heat transfer medium to cook the top of the item at the same time as the bottom. You can also use this method on frittatas, dumplings, etc. You can also use flavored liquids to impart flavor as well. I particularly like hard cider with chicken and pork.


11

The ingredient list on the commercial product already gives you several pointers to work with in building a recipe: A legume protein is used, with additional binders (tapioca starch). Probably not in plain flour form, since that would result in more of a pancake than a meat like texture. beet juice and paprika are used both for a reddish colour and to get ...


10

Summary or "detailed" instructions: flip frequently, and if it's still cooking too fast on the outside and too slow on the inside, adjust the temperature down a little. Maybe you'll take two or three tries to get it perfect, but such is life. Medium-high probably means somewhere between halfway and maximum on your stove. There's no temperature, don't worry ...


10

The differences are as follows: Quinoa is a pseudocerial coming from goosefoot wikipedia. It is one of the trendy "superfoods" because it has a very high nutritional value ánd is gluten free. I have always used it as a grain substitute and do not know if it's any good as the main ingredient for a burger. Quorn is a meat substitute made of mycoprotein from ...


10

Brown meat tastes good - Anne Burrell Of course you know this, the browning of the meat is a result of the Maillard Reaction, if you are not getting this result you are probably not cooking at a high enough temperature. Temperatures need to be high to bring about the Maillard reaction, but as long as the food is very wet, its temperature won’t climb ...


9

I've never used anything other than beef, dry spices, and sometimes garlic to make my hamburgers. Truthfully, I much prefer the taste of a burger with no binders. We buy our beef by the half cow, and make plenty of burgers. Freezer -> defrost -> Mix beef with spices -> Form burgers while still cold (I make a round ball with the meat, them compress it) -> ...


9

To make a perfect burger in the kitchen, a hot cast-iron skillet is your best friend. To keep from making a mess, use one of these: That's a splatter screen. It allows air to move freely, but keeps grease in the pan and off of your walls. EDIT: In comments, Cindy Askew recommended the above plus using the cheapest available aluminum foil to protect ...


8

Make sure you don't squirt the fluid all over the grill. Keep it on the charcoal. If you have to apply more fluid after you've lit it, you're doing it wrong. Douse the charcoal then wait a few minutes for it to soak in. This is a common mistake. People often pour on the fluid and immediately light it. It then burns away before the charcoal can ignite ...


8

In the US, hamburgers are usually flat patties weighing somewhere between 3 and 8oz. and typically 100% ground beef. Many variations are possible, including mixing spices and other ingredients into the meat, but binders such as egg and breadcrumbs are not common. The defining characteristics of a proper hamburger for most Americans are the shape (flat), ...


8

Your buns are likely sticking to the bottom of the tray. If they stick, they will expand vertically because they can't expand horizontally. They're stuck. Dust the trays with semolina flour, rice flour, and/or fine corn meal. You can even lightly dust them with white or rye flour, but the aforementioned flours are preferable. If you're retarding the buns, ...


8

If you have a pre-cooked burger patty, I'd suggest heating it in a frying pan / skillet over a high heat, add a splash of water and then cover with a small heat-proof bowl (a cloche), or a lid on your pan. The water will steam the burger back into life, adding moisture and trapping the heat to more thoroughly warm it through. I also use this technique when ...


8

If you're at a nicer restaurant - or nowadays even a midlevel restaurant, perhaps - you may be eating food that was cooked sous-vide. Sous-vide is helpful not only for letting the restaurant pre-prepare food without a loss of quality, but it allows substantially more rare preparation with no additional risk of foodborne illness. While a 160°F/71°C ...


7

I second the recommendation for Lukas Volger's Veggie Burgers Every Which Way. I've been working my way through it and have made several of the recipes so far, all of which have been good. However, I would say that not all of the recipes in the book work well for the grill. I've been doing everything vegan from the Volger book with mixed results. Many of ...


7

Here is Kenji Alt's in-depth recreation of the double-double animal-style burger. The core of his technique is: The process is simple: Sear the patty on one side, and squirt some mustard on it as it sizzles. Flip the patty over so that the mustard cooks into the second side. The patties are covered with the cheese, then the caramelized onions ...


7

The trick to eating a large hamburger the size of a McDonald's Big Mac (or even a Double Big Mac with four patties) is to grip the burger firmly while crushing it down a bit. It may take a big of practice to get right, but it's something most eaters of hamburgers seem to do instinctively. So much so I can't really describe the technique in a lot of detail, ...


7

If by "paper tape" you mean "strips of (food safe) paper or parchment" then yes, it's possible. But before we talk about the how, let's have a quick look at the why first: Most cooks want to match the size of the bun to the size of the patty or vice versa. Unfortunately, some recipes can be a bit unpredictable as far as the rising and expansion of the buns ...


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