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29

Coriander leaf/cilantro looks VERY similar to flat leaf parsley. When I have both at the house I sometimes resort to smelling them to know which is which. Cilantro is very strong smelling, and you'd definitely change the flavor of the dish if you left it out. Flat leaf parsley is significantly more subtle and has a much milder flavor and scent. It is not ...


28

I cannot +1 Peter V because of my poor reputation, but he is right: in Italian cooking you don't go for mix, what you look for is a balance between a few ingredients, normally one from different kind of foods: one cereal, one vegetable, one spice for example. The main spice (or fresh herb) is parsley: it is so common that it is used in figurative language ...


13

Refrigerator storage methods Some tender herbs (ex: cilantro/coriander and parsley) can be refrigerated by placing them in a cup of water (like a bouquet of flowers) and covering with a plastic bag. And like a bouquet, you'll want to change the water regularly. Ref: JustRightMenus, Michael Pryor You can also get away with simply wrapping them in a paper ...


12

Oh man. That's a lot of cilantro. Some people are more sensitive than others, but make sure you like it a lot before putting that much in a dish. In a perfect world we would all have ready access to scales and all recipes would list ingredients like these by weight instead of volume. That said, reality tends to lean more in favor of the volume-based ...


12

While it is true that there are a variety of mints, I think your biggest challenge is that it is "late in the season." I find that here (Philly, USA), in August, all of my herbs tend to develop a bitterness that is not there in spring and early summer. While it may be the variety, I don't think it is the age of the plant, as my mint comes back each year as ...


11

Tomato leaves are edible, both the articles agree on that. The Modern Farmer article says you'd have to eat pounds and pounds of them before you'd get appreciable amounts of toxins to make you ill, and even then it's more of an upset stomach issue. Some people might react more to Tomatine, which is the mild toxin in the leaves, and is also in green tomatoes. ...


10

Last summer was a long time ago. The National Center for Food Preservation has this to say about herbs in oil: Oils may be flavored with herbs if they are made up for fresh use, stored in the refrigerator and used within 2 to 3 days. There are no canning recommendations. ... Pesto is an uncooked seasoning mixture of herbs, usually including fresh basil, ...


10

Dry herbs are slower to release their flavors than fresh herbs; they will need extra cooking time to impart their full flavors, so add them to the dish sooner. Since they are less delicate and need the moisture, you may also want to add them along with a liquid, to help extract out the flavors. Crushing the larger-leaf herbs up a bit may also help. Use less ...


10

The green tops of garlic are called 'garlic scapes' (or sometimes, just 'scapes'). They are edible (a kind of garlic/chive mix) and there are plenty of recipes available online that use them.


9

One reason I love to plant garlic (In October in the NE US), is that I can use it 3 times during its life-cycle. After planting garlic sprouts. These sprouts (what you might be calling a leaf) can be cut back to ground level before winter and used in cooking...garlicky chive-like flavor and application. Then in the spring, they sprout again. After a ...


9

I think you might get better, less-grassy results by steeping the mint in the cream (heat the cream first) but not actually including the leaves in the ice cream. You want to get the aromatic oil to provide the mintiness, but leave out the actual greens which are making it grassy and herbal. Another option, as suggested in comments, would be to make a syrup ...


8

Spices can sometimes taste different when their context(other spices and foods) or preparation is altered. Other than trying known recipes, I occasionally taste an unfamiliar spice in several states over a period of time: raw in cheek for a little while Infused (like tea). Try some plain, some with salt, and some with sugar, (an acid like lemon juice or ...


8

I've never seen canned pesto, nor do I know if there is a way to do it safely. I will propose an alternate solution. Have you thought about freezing it? I've had pesto given to me as a gift before, but it was made as normal then frozen in a canning jar. It worked great. Did some more digging and eventually came across this, from the National Center for Home ...


8

Some example of herbs usage here in Italy (I'm 100% italian living near Milan): Basil: (for its fresh taste) Pasta with tomato sauce and a couple of leaves of fresh basil on top. Pizza Margherita: Mozzarella Cheese, tomatoes, basil. Pesto: basil, parmigiano cheese, pine nuts & olive oil. Oregano: (a little salty, chosen for its strong parfume) On ...


8

I believe your mystery plant is....parsley. This question was asked and answered here. It appears that the best explanation is a leaf variant on the common cultivar "Italian Giant". Having grown this cultivar in my home garden, I can attest to having personal experience with this leaf shape. Chop it up and use it as you would the rest of the parsley.


7

Cilantro The leaf on the left is Coriander - it's a slightly lighter green, and has rounder leaves. Botanical Classification Coriandrum sativum is an annual herb in the family Apiaceae. Uses All parts: leaves, roots, stems and seeds are used in cooking either as a garnish, a key ingredient or as a powder. Regions used/found Native to Southern ...


7

Adding herbs directly to baked goods usually results in very strong flavours. Infusing the sugar with the herbs gives a more subtle overtone rather than a full-on explosion. In some cases, of course, you might want a strong herb flavour, but where you just want a hint, infusing the sugar is great. The classic example is using stripped vanilla pods to make ...


7

By grinding it, you are also increasing the surface are of the herb when it reaches the tongue, and you are exposing the raw/inner (bitter) flavors of the herb to the mouth. When cooking with it "un-ground", the cooking process extracts just the oils from the herb, and leaves the leaf in tact which does not taste unpleasant to the senses. I would certainly ...


7

When we have had garlic in our garden I have used the garlic leaves. They do have a garlicky flavor but are milder than garlic cloves. I tend to use them more as I would chives or garlic chives as in addition to having the milder flavor than the cloves they make for a quite nice presentation. Regarding drying them, I have never tried it. Off the top of my ...


7

Apparently marigold is quite common in Georgian cooking. I found the following excerpt on this page : Marigold is the "saffron" of Georgia, and although only a little is used, it does make a difference to the colour and flavour. Now, you might think it might be hard to get the spice marigold in Japan, but you would be wrong! I know of at least 3 sources (...


7

Dousing your herbs with fertilizer is not going to preserve your herbs, and could make you sick as many fertilizers are toxic. If you want really fresh herbs you can keep them in pots on a windowsill, otherwise your spraying water method is about as good as you are likely to get.


7

You bought thai basil. It's used a lot in south east Asia, and an anise-like taste is one of its qualities. I don't use it often, but I always have some in stock in the freezer, for some thai or Vietnamese curries or soups.


7

Rocket has an inherent bitterness and not much sweetness, so any pesto you make from it will have that quality. You can try and balance it with sweetness, acidity, etc but that will only go so far. Basically, if it's going to be too bitter for someone's taste you're better off making something else, or using the rocket's strong flavors in conjunction with ...


7

From fooducate.com The difference between the two is where they are obtained from a plant. Herbs come from the leafy and green part of the plant. Spices are parts of the plant other than the leafy bit such as the root, stem, bulb, bark or seeds. Examples of herbs include basil, oregano, thyme, rosemary, parsley and mint. From spice-racks....


6

it has to do with moisture. The ti leaves are to help with the internal steaming. You can use dried corn husks you can get in a Mexican super market. Soak them for 10 minutes and then wrap your item with it. It works well. I've done this for lau lau before and should work with your turkey.


6

Grow them! It's easy, cheap and they'll always be available. NOthing you'll ever grow will give so much back for so little input. Many herbs - especially rosemary, sage and thyme - are woody perennials and once established in a sunny corner of your garden, they will grow and spread and you'll have them all year round, if your winters aren't too harsh. ...


6

Kaffir Lime Leaves are using in Thai and Indian cooking in two ways: They may be added whole to a recipe (such as a soup) and behave like bay leaves; diners take them out and don't eat them. They can be ground fine as part of a spice paste and make the flavoring base for the recipe. There are a few recipes which use slivered kaffir lime leaves, but they ...


6

While the amount of flavor can be a factor, often a bigger factor can be texture, or liquid released from the herbs when adding them directly. For example, when you infuse mint directly into cream, the mint will release enough liquid that the cream will no longer whip properly. Or with a meringue, you would rather have a smooth texture and even coloring ...


6

Turmeric is a rhizome that contains some starches. Those starches will hydrate and gelatinize like any other starch and thicken liquid. I don't know how its thickening power compares to other starches like flour or corn starch. This paper has a chart of vegetable starch sources that would imply that turmeric's starch content is fairly high at 76% In many ...


6

I know that link-only answers are discouraged here, but I don't know that there's another efficient way of answering this question. Here's a link to a document that gives basically most of the information you want, if you match it up to McGee's tables and description of chemical flavor components (e.g., pp. 389-395 in the revised edition of On Food and ...


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