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26

You probably don't need to remove the stalks from the leaves, especially for young plants. However, the older and stronger the stalk becomes, the less appetizing it will be, in my opinion. To rip the leaves off easily, especially with thicker/sturdier stalks, just start at the top of the stalk and firmly pinch it. Then, run your fingers down the stalk, ...


24

I don’t know what you dug up, but rosemary doesn’t have bulbs so do not eat this! For plant id questions (which is outside the scope of this site), I recommend our sister site Gardening SE.


12

It depends on your mint, and even the time of year. I grow mint in a pot in the garden, and the early growth of the year can be chopped (finely) stems and all for things like potato salad or falafel. At this point the leaves are small and you need quite a lot of them, and the stems are soft at least near the tips. Later on, you might get away with ...


12

In addition to the great answer by M.K: Most industrially dried and fresh herbs are not even of the same exact kind. Taking basil as an example: Most basil species don't preserve their aroma well during the drying process. So while you can use any kind of basil for fresh use, you can maybe only use certain kinds for drying, because they preserve the aroma ...


10

Dry herbs in general last longer and have the "advantage" of better conservation. But they take more time to release their flavours, so you want to cook them earlier and for longer time (for example, adding dry oregano when you are cooking onions, later on adding the tomato sauce, as liquids will also help to release flavour). With fresh herbs, you want to ...


8

I suspect that the word intended was "capsicum". 2 ounces of chili pepper would be reasonable given the amounts of other spices. 2 ounces of capsaicin would be difficult to source and would make the beer essentially inedible.


6

It depends on the herbs. Something like thyme or rosemary or oregano can withstand cooking for a long time and should be removed before eating or blending (IMO) Other herbs like basil will not withstand long cooking time and should be added raw at the end, or at serving time to have their full flavor shine.


6

I would vote for a spelling error, and that capaicine is actually capsaicin. I can't find any reference for the original spelling. I have never consumed horehound beer, but it seems to me that, in looking at the ingredients, a little spice-heat would make sense. Think of the spiciness you get in the back of your throat when drinking ginger ale. I would ...


5

The dark underside is normal for some varieties, but the white on top is another matter. It could well be powdery mildew which while seemingly not toxic will spoil the eating qualities, or it could be mould from damp storage. I'd look for better leaves elsewhere on the plant. Here's a little more detail


5

If ⁠— by "measurable" ⁠— you are referring to a quantified chemical analysis, then sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L) consists of 26 different compounds, of which terpenoids linalool and 1,8-cineole make up the majority of them1. I haven't seen any research data that specifically quantifies the impact of dehydration process on aroma profile, but this paper ...


4

If you mean quantifiable difference, the salient difference between fresh and dry basil is the amount (parts per million) of fragile, aromatic organic compounds (including some volatile organics; these are what you smell.) In basil (in the mint family), I distantly recall reading that those tasty chemicals are mainly terpenes. A chemist could quantify which ...


4

Sage, Laurel and Rosemary can all be dried and retain a lot of their flavor. In fact, for laurel, the flavor is enhanced by drying. There is little to be gained from freezing these, and I suspect that chopping beforehand would decrease their flavor components significantly. For Rosemary and (Bay) Laurel - washed sprigs (twigs with leaves attached) can be ...


4

You need fresh rosemary and give it a quick char and not allow it to burn. That's sort of the same technique of using a blowtorch for crème brulée and the same "doneness" of charred vegetables - caramelized but not burnt If you're smelling smoke, it is already too burnt to use.


3

Where did you get it? Looks like it could be epazote.


3

Fresh oregano is a wonderful herb, there's no reason you can't use it, just wash the leaves with clean water beforehand to make sure they are free of soil or other contaminants. In the case of the leaves shown in the picture some look like they have fungus growing on them, they are probably safe if cooked but I wouldn't expect them to taste very good. Use ...


3

I think the medeberry is goji, so that's edible. You can eat lotus seed and Longan pulp. I am familiar with those "packs of dried things" and usually you can eat all of the stuff, but I usually leave the twig-looking stuff.


2

Depending on how thick the stems are, they might get quite hard and taste "wooden". They also get more bitter the more you travel down the stem. So, don't be super picky when discarding stems, but don't be too generous either. I usually discard stems when they start to get somewhat rigid when you try to bend them. Here's an article I quickly found on the ...


2

The answer is the same for herbs as you got for chili - you lose vitamins (not that you will get much from the amount of herbs usually used in cooking anyway) and some volatile compounds, which are the bits that make the flavors. In general you can expect to use about 2-3 times as much fresh herb as you would dried to get the same level of flavoring in a ...


2

I doubt you could even do this for different brands of hot chilli powder (for example). Never mind trying to come up with an equivalent between things that aren't equivalent. Fresh chillies are even more variable. Strong flavours like herbs and spices interact with the other flavours in a dish, so something you find equivalent in one dish won't be right in ...


1

Your post suggests that you just picked these leaves. Please check your plant to see if any other leaves are coated with this mysterious white substance. If so, your plant may be affected by an insect, insecticide dusting, or fungi. All things that you should address. If you have a County Arboretum nearby, you could consult with them. Take a sprig of the ...


1

When processing leaves into tea, there are three important steps: Withering: this happens in the shadow or in the sun depending on what tea you want to make. In your case, I think sun-drying is proper. The goal is to allow the leaves to dry and soften a bit. Rolling: after withering, you can roll the leaves, to squeesh the flavor from the inside to the ...


1

It's good to keep in all vegetables and non vegetables. We gring it with other spices including salt and make powder to put in salads etc. Its so tasty. We use it in potato vegetables too.


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