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67

It's not honey that's changed since ancient times, it's wine! Wine makers in ancient Rome lacked the knowledge and equipment to prevent oxidation and unwanted bacterial colonies, so their product was pretty awful by modern standards, being both sour and bitter with all sorts of off flavors. Honey and spices were added to try and make it palatable. So you ...


34

A candy thermometer is pretty much always the answer when it comes to candymaking, which includes caramelizing sugar. Assuming the soft ball stage is indeed the best for brewing, all you have to do is keep track of the temperature: the soft ball stage is at 112-116C/234-241F. While you can certainly buy specialized candy thermometers (they often have clips ...


33

Honey is entirely useable after crystallization. This is a natural and spontaneous process and doesn't affect the honey negatively in terms of flavor or quality. It's dependent upon the sugar content of the particular honey, and in particular the crystallization speed is determined by: the nectar source collected by bees (the sugar composition of honey), ...


29

Honey is not vegan. In short, the core tenet of veganism is living without exploiting anything in the animal kingdom, and most (if not all) vegans consider taking honey from bees a form of exploitation.


21

I'm just a humble beekeeper. I went about my business doing what I do, ignorant of other ways or ideas. I sell my honey at a local food co-op, being the only local beekeeper who can meet their demand. I did a taste-tasting event one day where I got to interact with those who buy honey. WOW! What an eye opening experience. There were folks who would not ...


20

There is apparently evidence that some of the flavour compounds in honey deteriorate during heating: http://www.ibrabee.org.uk/component/k2/item/1837-effect-of-heat-on-honey The text suggests that honey should not be heated to more than 50 degrees Celsius (122 degrees Fahrenheit). So it might be wise to let the tea cool down a bit before adding the honey. ...


20

It's ALL different from year to year - from season to season, from area to area. Honey is nectar that has been converted to an invert sugar by the bees. Then moisture removed to < 18%, then sealed with wax over the comb. The flavors and quality depend 100% on where the bees are collecting the nectar. I have found no difference in the type of bee, however....


19

It is honeydew honey. It is not made from nectar, but from tree parasite secretions. It has a quite different taste from regular flower/nectar honey, and it is much darker. Sometimes it is also called forest honey. Wikipedia has a paragraph on it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honey#Honeydew_honey There is a slim possibility that it is not a real honey at ...


17

Here are a few options: Make a salt barrier around the jar. Keep jar in a bowl full of water. Use air-tight container (doesn't need to be a jar). Any of the above should keep ants away from your honey.


16

If the honey has always had a water content below ~18% and is continuously stored in a sealed container (for instance a glass jar), it is perfectly safe to eat as long as you are over 1 year old. In fact, pasteurized honey is inferior in quality. The pollen and spores will remain in there either way, even if they're dead and can only be removed by (expensive)...


15

Honey should be stored at 50-70 Degrees Fahrenheit Honey is similar in to olive oil and should be storaged between 50-70 Degrees Fahrenheit according to Max Shrem from Slashfood: Similar to olive oil, honey should be stored at a cool temperature between 50 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit. So, it's best to store it away from your oven or stove. Also, it ...


12

Honey is very stable for a number of reasons. The main ones though are the low amount of water (most honey is under 18% water) and the high amount of sugar (which is a preservative). Both of these things keep things like mold and bacteria from being able to grow. Over a long period of time (and if left unsealed) the honey could absorb moisture and then ...


12

Clover is generic in the US, there are other very cool varieties but they might not be as easy to find. Grocery store clover honey is pretty much a commodity, I buy 5 pound bottles of Sue Bee Clover Honey, made in Iowa, for less than $15. Watch for phonies: How to tell if it is honey, super filtered honey, or corn syrup? Wildflower and Orange Blossom are ...


12

In the event that you aren't keen on buying/using a candy thermometer, I thought I'd add some additional information. The 'soft ball' stage in candy-making is the stage where the sugar has thoroughly melted - meaning it's no longer granulated. The non-thermometer testing method is to drop a small amount of the mixture into cool water, and see if it forms a ...


11

Crystals breed crystals, so once a sugary substance starts to crystallize, it will seem to crystallize very rapidly. Gently warm it in a water bath or the microwave and the crystals will dissolve. This is very common with "raw" honey, but it happens with processed honey as well. It's normal.


10

The answer, quite simply, is no. Even advanced laboratories have difficulty making the determination for certain. This is also a complex problem that gets more difficult as various standards are used and then fail. Before 2000, a common solution was to simply use microscopic analysis to look for pollen and and other vegetable matter. Since then, many ...


9

The comb, which is beeswax, holds the honey. Honeycomb is used for decorative desserts, placed on or along side nicely arranged fruit, is used as a spread on toast or bread or crackers and is served with cheese platters. As a child I loved honeycomb, would pop a hunk in my mouth and chew like gum until all that was left was the wax, and either spit the wax ...


9

There is no single well-defined idea of "degradation" of honey. I guess there will be some temperature above which it stops being honey, but that be a charring temperature somewhere above 200 celsius. This doesn't mean that honey stays the same all the time. It is very complex, and some compounds can certainly get destroyed when heated. Some are even ...


9

This is most likely referring to honey processed without any heating, often simply called raw honey, or possibly cold-extracted or cold-processed. It likely has more flavor and color preserved than commercially-processed honey (which uses plenty of heat), but it may not be much different from gently heated honey. It's not actually cold (honey flows really ...


9

Honey will caramelize and burn before the chicken is fully cooked. It would be better to bake or roast the chicken in the oven at an even temperature, if you've marinated it prior to. Covered in foil at first and then finished off uncovered to add a little colour. If you prefer to cook it in the pan, then adding the honey should be your last step. Turn off ...


9

Different types of honey come from bees gathering nectar (and some incidental pollen) from different types of flowers. Acacia honey comes from acacia flowers, clover honey from clover. Wildflower honey comes from bees gathering from an unknown mix of flowers, when the supplier doesn't have control over or knowledge of what flowers contributed to the honey -- ...


9

The raw honey at your farmer's market is likely unfiltered. Usually raw, unfiltered raw honey can only be purchased directly from the bee farm. Characterised by fine textured crystals, it looks cloudier and contains particles and flecks made of bee pollen, honeycomb bits, propolis, and even broken bee wing fragments. Raw and unfiltered honey and ...


9

It is probably a best-before date (possibly regarding crystallization of the honey or other cosmetic changes), and should still be edible afterwards. Most honey has historically been stored raw, it is still sold in the comb in places, and has still been known for having a long shelf life if left in a closed container. Honey has mild antiseptic qualities, ...


8

It depends on what the bees had for lunch :) . Acacia honey is extremely sweet, with no bitter aftertaste. Chestnut honey (easy to find in Italy, don't know about elsewhere) is dark and has a strong bitter note. I personally love how the bittersweet goes with butter and bread, but some people hate it. Generic polyflower honey usually does not have a bitter ...


8

If you're trying to avoid char, then switching to honey or any sugar is probably in the wrong direction. Sugar burns...quick. I'd recommend three things overall specific to this crust: Use less oil. If your oil is dripping off in buckets and causing significant fires - you've got too much. Just try a light brushing on the meat. Use a different oil. ...


8

You can neutralize the acidity of your drink by adding a half teaspoon of baking soda, but don't do this. Apart from fizzing up like a volcano, your lemon drink, or what is left of it, will taste pretty awful. What you want to do is reduce the perceived acidity. This can be done simply by adding more honey. I suggest adding a teaspoon at a time until it ...


8

Botulism is spot on - not only can botulism spores survive in honey (hence the "no honey for babies under 1 year" rule), the truffles have grown in soil, which is a typical source of Clostridium botulinum spores. There are well- known reports of botulism caused by garlic in oil and truffles in oil (albeit rarer due to the way smaller total amount of ...


8

Based on the description given in the manga (specifically "I rubbed it on the meat before boiling" [emphasis mine]) I would guess that this is not actually an effect of tenderization at all. Instead, the effect is possibly closer to that of velveting. The velveting technique is typically done with a thin coating of corn starch, and my working theory is ...


8

The reason honey shouldn't be kept in the fridge is that it crystallises easily at low temperatures (even that's just a change in texture, not a spoilage problem). Once mixed with plenty of water so the sugars are dissolved, that won't be an issue. I would expect the addition of what's essentially sugar to have no negative effect on the keeping properties ...


7

The crystallising of honey depends on the amount of glucose (sugar) you have in the honey. Crystallisation occurs in solutions that are (like honey) oversaturated with sugars. Less saturation means less likelihood for crystallisation while water presence affects the distribution and size of crystals. In terms of moisture you have two types of ...


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