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5

You can substitute sugar straight over for glucose but you need to increase the wet ingredients or decrease the dry ingredients as glucose absorbs more liquids than regular sugar. Take a look at this article and this one! But mixing sugar and glucose is done in baking for the texture! In pretty much every other regard when it comes to cooking/baking, ...


4

Here is a quick answer: Fructose: Sweetness of Fructose depends on temperature: at lower temperatures (i.e. ice-cream) is sweeter. at higher temperatures (i.e. hot coffee or tee) is less sweet Fructose is always sweeter than glucose Amount of calories doesn't change: cal of 1g of fructose equals cal of 1g of glucose Here's a table: SUGAR | ...


3

I'm no chemist or anything, but the sugar is probably at fault. Honey is a saturated sugar solution. So saturated, in fact, that it tends to crystalize over time. Mustard is a mix of solids (mustard seeds) with liquids (water, vinegar and others). Its consistency is determined by how much liquid the solids can absorb. By mixing both together, you add lots ...


3

The reason your ice-cream was sweeter is simply that honey is sweeter than straight up glucose. Ref. BBC Good Food This is because fructose is sweeter than the same quantity of glucous. Ref. from healthline BBC has a good guide to swapping sugar for healthier substitutes (I assume this is your aim!) Link but nothing about ice-cream. I would recommend ...


2

Something I think most people are unaware of: Runny and set honey are made from different types of nectar. For example, rape (which is grown a lot where I live) will result in very hard setting honey. We had to be careful to extract the honey as soon as the comb was full or it would set in the cells and is then impossible to extract. This is often not ...


1

What you are describing is most likely creamed honey, which is also known by a variety of other local names including whipped honey (for those in the USA I think). This is honey that has been induced to produce micro-crystals by a couple of different methods. Basically these boil down to addition of seed crystals to the honey that then initiate a chain ...


1

As far as I can tell, with lots of googling, recipes for honey-fermented garlic have the process happening at room temperature, with fermentation occurring for up to a month. I have found some questions on the internet about safety, though this seems to be a fairly common ferment. The process of fermentation itself creates an inhospitable environment for ...


1

I found this article online: Heating up to 37°C (98.6 F) causes loss of nearly 200 components, part of which are antibacterial. Heating up to 40°C (104 F) destroys invertase, an important enzyme. Heating up to 50°C (122 F) for more than 48 hrs. -John Skinner, University of Tennessee Personally I like my tea really hot, so this wouldn't work for me. You ...


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