39

Do NOT eat this. You figured out right that the stuff on top is mold. The thing that makes mold dangerous is the mycotoxins produced by it and these will likely remain in the sauce even if you scrape off the furry stuff. So eating this comes with high risk of affecting your health. Move it to the trash bin right away. I would recommend to try again with a ...


23

The seeds of all peppers are bitter, you won't notice this when you are using a single pepper in a large dish of food, but if you make hot sauce without removing the seeds you will have a noticeable, and possibly unpleasant bitterness. Grinding the seeds will add more off flavors, so it is worth the effort to get rid of them.


22

What you're describing isn't all that different from how they make various products like Liquid Smoke (make smoke along with steam, then condense that steam). You will need to make sure that some actual condensation occurs (for example, by having a lid for the smokey vapor to condense onto). However, it may be simpler to add a liquid smoke-type product ...


12

I just made a batch of hot sauce that was very cayenne-heavy myself. Keep the seeds. You want to get every last bit of heat out of those babies, especially if you are diluting with a significant amount of vinegar. The only use case I can think of for chopping the tops off as described in your recipe is if you aren't already planning to strain out the ...


12

First, the most capsaicin (heat) is in the pith of the peppers. You'll find it to a lesser extent in the seeds. Keeping the seeds will definitely change the texture of the sauce, but if you like that texture then by all means, use them. You can also purée the sauce to make it smoother. I would start with the flesh of the pepper and then use the pith to alter ...


11

The heat isn't in the seeds, it's in the ribs which hold the seeds. Also, there is no right answer when it comes to wasting time vs wasting food, everybody has a personal preference on whether to use a technique which saves the one or the other. You can surely remove the seeds and/or ribs any way you like, by cutting away whatever part you like, or cooking ...


11

I mostly agree with GdD's answer, but I'll add a couple more comments. This may be an obvious answer, but I'd generally follow the recommendation on the specific bottle. Some sauces will clearly state "refrigerate after opening," and others won't. The Frank's FAQ linked in the question is an example of these sorts of instructions: two specific products ...


11

Most hot sauces are pretty inhospitable to foodborne illnesses, and can safely stay in the cupboard rather than the refrigerator. Nevertheless, the flavors in the sauces will break down over time, storing them in the fridge as opposed to room temperature will slow deterioration and keep the sauces fresher longer. If you use your sauces quickly enough then ...


8

Low acid products must be pressure canned. Products intended for sale must be canned in FDA registered facilities and typically inspected by a state regulator. Many areas still have community canneries with some being FDA registered and state inspected where you can prepare your product with equipment that is well suited to the task. These community ...


7

Know that the traditional Frank's Buffalo Wings Sauce is just Frank's RedHot and melted butter. I'd definitely start there, and tweak with the substitution. The old standard is 1/2 cup (118ml) Frank's RedHot to 1/3 cup (79ml) melted butter. Vinegar is a distinct possibility, to me neither buttermilk nor ketchup make sense. You might find this recipe for ...


7

I am Adrienne Fay, Merchandise Manager for Hot Licks, Maker of Suicide and XXX. I just discovered this post. Unfortunately even I can not give you the Scoville rating because we have never had our sauce rated on the Scoville scale for two reasons: The rating system is intended for peppers and even two peppers on the same vine will have two different ratings....


7

This is the same question, in essence as why any of these combinations are dissonant or unexpected: Marina sauce on soba noodles Cheese on Chinese stir fry Haggis jambalaya Every cuisine is a part of a culture, and there are cultural expectations for what is normal or not normal. A deeper question would be how and why such cultural expectations develop. ...


7

There's no point in getting pure capsaicin and diluting it yourself when you can buy capsaicin in just about any strength you want with all the work done for you. If you want something truly, painfully hot then get capsaicin 1 mil and then measure it into your dishes with an eye dropper. Be real careful with it, use gloves and don't sniff it, even at 1M it ...


7

If capsaicin is soluble in alcohol, and you want a sauce with heat but no taste, there's a very simple way to do it if you do get a hold of pure capsaicin. Keep in mind that pepper sprays used for personal protection or law enforcement are in the range of 10% to 30% capsaicin. Bear spray (commonly seen here in Alaska) is required by law to be at or under 2% ...


7

You could just add water instead of extra sauce. The water will cook off just as much as the sauce would have, leaving you with essentially just sauce by the end. If that's not spicy/saucy enough for you, then it means you did actually need some of that extra sauce you've been adding. Alternatively, you could try lower temperature. If it's all cooking down ...


6

I've definitely done this with ketchup before, with a couple key tweaks: Spreading the sauce onto a rimmed baking sheet. This is to maximize surface area for smoking. I used a Traeger pellet-smoker, so I'm not sure how a Weber might work. I'm not sure how effective this'll be in your case, but the general principle is sound (and delicious). Example recipe ...


6

The mayonnaise itself is only a stable emulsion in certain temperature ranges. If you are talking about standard mayonnaise (made with egg yolk), it will split when heated, and won't help your new sauce at all. If you are planning to use one of those vinegar-oil emulsions sold in supermarkets under the name mayonnaise, I cannot predict how they will handle....


5

As Max points out, emulsifiers work by allowing two normally incompatible ingredients to mix. There are different ways that emulsifiers do this. Lecithin, probably the most common emulsifier, can do this because its molecule has a water-binding end and an oil-binding end. Hydrocolloids, like xanthan gum, can also have emulsification properties, but they work ...


5

In Italy we usually mix béchamel and tomato sauce for "Pasta al forno" (or "pasta pasticciata") and lasagna, in order to not have a full distinction in the final dish between the two sauces and their tastes. However this is not mandatory, but my grandma, my mum and me are used to do it (and I see some other people doing the same). P.s. I live in Italy and ...


5

While you can add things to your product to make it shelf stable, most of them are either going to be prohibitive to use at a small level or they will significantly change your sauce. For instance, industrial preservatives like calcium proprionate can be used as a preservative in some meat preparations, but the usage level is usually around .1-.4%, which ...


5

It's normal for some separation to occur, especially based on the makeup/composition of the sauce is. If it's a regular long-cooked vinegar and water hot sauce, then there would be very little separation that would occur. If it's a vinegar and oil based hot sauce, then there would be quite a lot of separation. If it's a vinegar based hot sauce, but made ...


5

This will definitely work, but I would recommend stirring it every once in a while as it will mostly be affecting only the surface. A shallow vessel with a larger surface area will also impart more smokiness faster.


5

Better or worse is a judgement call. Smoking the peppers then making the sauce v. smoking the sauce will produce different results, but both will impart smokiness. So, you can, in fact, impart smoke flavor in a liquid by using a smoker. For example, I've smoked water, then used it to cook eggs.


5

You cannot calculate it, you can only measure it. Scoville is a subjective scale. Wikipedia tells you how it is measured - by testing with human panelists, using a certain protocol. As all subjective scales, Scoville is ordinal. Even though it is expressed in numbers, these numbers are best understood as ranks - you cannot assert that "1000 SHU is twice ...


5

The only difference between something that would be called "hot sauce" and a "chili paste" is the consistency, and perhaps how finely ground the chilis are (though harissas are usually pretty finely ground.) They can both be used to cook with, and they can both be used as condiments. If there's a specific type of hot sauce you're looking to replicate (e.g. ...


4

The more basic the recipe the greater the shelf life. I create and sell hot sauces here in Chicago for VK Urban Farms. We have a pure Ghost Pepper sauce that is literally Ghost peppers sautéed in vegetable oil and then processed with equal part vinegar. The 50/50 ratio ensures that nothing will ever compromise the integrity of this sauce. (within reason) ...


4

Although I am uncertain about Italian cookery, this operation would seem fairly unorthodox in the French repertoire. That being said, it is customary to add cream, salt pork or bacon, and flour to sauce tomate, which essentially replicates the addition of Bechamel, although it seems Escoffier deigned not to include cream in his recipe for this mother sauce. ...


4

Emulsifier will make two or more element blend together, for example the egg in the mayonnaise recipe will act as an emulsifier. A thickener will simply make something thick, as you wrote, cornstarch is a thickener. Personally, I would use neither cornstarch or xanthan gum in a chill sauce; seems to me that it is a shortcut instead of letting it cook down ...


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