23

The seeds of all peppers are bitter, you won't notice this when you are using a single pepper in a large dish of food, but if you make hot sauce without removing the seeds you will have a noticeable, and possibly unpleasant bitterness. Grinding the seeds will add more off flavors, so it is worth the effort to get rid of them.


12

First, the most capsaicin (heat) is in the pith of the peppers. You'll find it to a lesser extent in the seeds. Keeping the seeds will definitely change the texture of the sauce, but if you like that texture then by all means, use them. You can also purée the sauce to make it smoother. I would start with the flesh of the pepper and then use the pith to alter ...


3

It's been a long time since I had seen my mother make her own chilli sause. I had forgotten this step. She would remove the stems and put the rest in a blender. Add some water and blend. Once blended very finely, she would drain it all through a strainer, into a pot. It did not seem that she waisted much in pulp, whole fairly getting rid of the seeds quick ...


3

Basically you can't prevent this from happening as it is a physiological (part of your body's natural function) reaction to an irritant - in this case the chemical capsaicin in the chili fruit stimulating the trigeminal nerve. There is such a thing as building tolerance, but I don't know if this will reduce the physiological effects, or just that you have ...


2

None of the flavors were overpowering (it didn't taste mostly like onions or jalapenos or garlic) That statement provides the key you can work with: prepare a bowl of each ingredient. make a reasonable guess as to the proportions and mix a sample from a small amount of each. taste the sample: if one ingredient is very overpowering, discard the sample and ...


2

First, ask if they cook any of the ingredients. It's likely that they are all raw. Next, I would probably start with a mix with an approximate base that has the same color as the original sauce ( e.g. 1:1:1 with one clove of garlic). Save some of it on the side to use again, then add some of each ingredient to your base. 2:1:1:1 / 1:2:1:1 / 1:1:2:1 etc....


2

You can roll your own XO sauce by stir frying (of couse, everything chopped) shallots, chili peppers, garlic, Jinhua ham, dried shrimps, dried scallops (conpoy), and cooking Shaoxing wine, approximately in this order. A good alternative to Jinhua ham would be Spanish jamón serrano (or ibérico), or essentially any dry cured ham. If you don't have dried ...


2

Pasteurization to make it shelf stable is simple. Just heat the mixture stirring constantly at 180F for 10 minutes, then immediately bottle in sterilized containers. This stops the fermentation and minimizes any chance that your sauce could ever make anyone sick, assuming you fermented it long enough to get down to something like 4.0 acidity on your ph ...


1

I leave seeds in while either cooking my peppers or fermenting them. Once I'm ready to process it into sauce, I run the peppers thru a masticating juicer. I end up with the most amount of pulp in the sauce that way. And zero seeds.


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