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14

Yes. Make it again and don't add horseradish. I'm totally serious - no traditional hummus recipe in the known universe has horseradish in it. There is nothing you are going to be able to do to your existing batch to remove that flavor, other than diluting it, but I don't think you'd be able to dilute it enough to be worth the effort.


10

While you can make a decent hummus with a blender, it will be thinner than the hummus you would make in a food processor (at least thinner than my recipe). If you have a potato masher or ricer, either would do the job nicely, giving you a texture that is less smooth than you might get with a food processor, but definitely good. I like the texture when done ...


9

Interesting question. While I realize that dictionaries are descriptive, they're what we have to go by for common usage, so let's consult three: Wikipedia: A condiment is a spice, sauce, or preparation that is added to food to impart a particular flavor, to enhance its flavor,1 or in some cultures, to complement the dish. The term originally described ...


9

There are three considerations for deciding whether to skin them or not. Do you like the texture/flavour with the skins on Do you, or those eating the hummus have dietary reasons to avoid the skins How much do you want to make a culturally/regionally 'accurate' dish. I, for example, like the texture that the skins add to hummus, but I only mash my ...


9

In Israel I have often seen hummus/falafel/thina served with a hot sauce called skhug, I have mostly seen the green variety (skhug yarok), which is a sauce made of fresh herbs, garlic, chili, lemon juice, garlic, olive oil, and some spices. Hummus is often just served with thina on the side and with olive oil, but there is a lot of variety ... I have seen ...


7

Roasted, salted dry chickpeas are a snack food. I would not expect for you to be able to make humus out of them; for one thing, they would have way too much salt, and the texture would be wrong. It might be possible with a lot of experimentation, but you'd need to go through several failed batches before you got one which worked. Personally, I'd just go ...


6

Plastic wrap works for storage. Some folks brush olive oil to the top of the hummus to create a barrier from the air drying it out when it sits out on a table waiting to be eaten.


6

Capsaicin dissolves easily in oils (and alcohol). Steeping or gently heating chili peppers in oil will easily produce a spicy oil. You could use crushed red peppers but you might get more interesting flavors by using a fresh pepper. A single habanero would give you an interesting fruitiness and all the heat you could ever want. As for the lemon- Lemon ...


5

I soaked the roasted chickpeas for 24 hours or so, with a few changes of water, and they seemed to rehydrate just fine. I cooked them in a pressure cooker until tender (overall, about 50 minutes, in 15 minute stretches), and they ended up with about the right texture, but with a washed-out taste, and the water looked like a thin, white, chickpea broth. I ...


5

mortar and pestle works perfectly. Watch out for your fingers, though. When the pestle gets all slippery it is pretty easy to hurt yourself. In a pinch, I have also used a heavy glass (think mojito) with a thick bottom as a pestle, and a plastic bowl as a mortar. Messy, but when you must have hummus messiness is just a detail.


4

I've always made my hummus in the blender. Just make sure to put the oil, yogurt and any other liquid ingredients at the bottom (in first) so that they're blended in first, before it gets too dry from the chickpeas. It'll get pretty thick, but a quick scrape with a spatula will get things moving again. A recent trick I learned was to use warm chickpeas ...


4

I loved hummus but then found out that I am allergic to sesame seeds. To substitute, I have used sunflower seed butter, almond butter or cashew butter. I have also tried combining a few of the nut butters for a more complex taste with good results. I have heard peanut butter works, but I am also allergic to peanuts so I cannot say much about it. Whatever ...


3

No, it is not safe to can hummus, even with a pressure canner. The problem is that it has a paste consistency, and the temperature has trouble penetrating through the middle of the jar. No safe home canning process has been established which can consistently reach the required temperatures. You can buy canned hummus, but that's no contradiction. Home ...


3

Plastic wrap, and press it to the surface of the hummus rather than over the edges of the container.


3

(yes, I know, I cheat by posting a non-answer) I don't think that there can be a real answer to that question. There must be dozens of "authentic" recipes for Falafel and hummus; and I am not talking about westernized variation of the recipe. In the case of the hummus, maybe the chickpeas are fresh or dry, maybe the olive oil is different (generic vs. ...


3

I'm allergic to sesame (it sucks), so I use sunflower seed butter. I really like it, but I don't really know what I'm missing.


3

Another idea: push the chick peas through a strainer with wooden spoon. You can probably get your hummus as smooth as you would with a blender. Worked for me.


3

Slow cooking your own chick peas make them come out very soft and easy to blend, it also makes for much better hummus than the canned variety, before I got an immersion blender, I used a potato masher.


3

I've used lentils with good results. My kid is allergic to sesame, so I've tried different things and the best results where with some plain lentils. It doesn't have the same tanginess but it definitely changes the flavor from chickpeas to hummus. Most of people don't seem to notice the difference, but I haven't tried with people that had been raised on ...


3

I'm sensitive to sesame seeds and usually use hemp hearts instead. They're several times the price, though. Neat thoughts on just using a nut butter, y'all. I can't have peanuts, but I can have other nuts… I was about to make some cashew butter anyway, so that works!


2

I mix one part flax seeds and one part Olive Oil. It's pretty good, and you get more fiber. ;)


2

One way you could reduce the potency of the taste is by adding more chickpeas, but that assumes you like the taste of horseradish and just want it to be more subtle. (It also assumes you have a more reasonably sized batch that doesn't already have a whole jar of horseradish in it.) Once you're using more than one or two cans of chickpeas, you should ...


2

Fresh-made hummus, without any preservatives added, will usually start to spoil after a couple of hours. This is actually perfectly normal behaviour, as the warm protein and fat rich environment is perfect for some microscopic friends to breed in. This is actually why restaurant hummus is always so much better than supermarket hummus, which needs to be ...


2

Beside the dictionary answers, I think is quite reasonable to think of condiments as those products that impart tastes to food as well as nutritional values but are not easily or pleasant to consume alone; impart taste but are of negligible nutritional relevance. Among the first examples are oil and butter, among the second ones mustard and salt.* This ...


1

My advice if you want long shelf life hummus, would be to make a dehydrated product which comes to life when a little water is stirred in. I wouldn't add any other preservatives unless your food scientist thought it was necessary.


1

Grinding the chickpeas before cooking kind of defeats the purpose. To use a food mill to its best, you shouldn't do any grinding before you cook the chickpeas. After you cook them, they will be more accepting of grinding or other techniques. Cook them low and slow just as you would any other bean. When they are tender (and cool enough to handle), put them ...


1

Maybe just not enough salt? Perhaps you forgot to add salt, or you switched from tahini with salt to without. Lack of salt, to most people, will make something otherwise well-seasoned taste bland. Beyond that, since you're saying it also smells less garlicky, perhaps you used garlic that wasn't as strong as usual, or less of it. The fact that it partially ...


1

I've used both the strainer method and the potato masher method. It was a bit labor intensive to get the chick peas through the strainer, but worked OK. I like the texture I get with the potato masher better. It's an easy cleanup too; the masher is much easier to wash than the strainer with chickpea remnants is.


1

To help reduce the fat content, I have used the concentrated flavor of roasted sesame oil. It tastes pretty good. Use about one tbs. of oil to a can of processed chick peas. I also have flavored with garlic, harrisa, diced tomato (meat only, no juice) or concentrated tomato paste, parsley.


1

Not all hummus needs tahini. For example at a tunsian restaurant down the street they are tahini free.


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